Canoe/Kayak caddy

photoguy

Well-known member
Messages
718
Reaction score
121
Location
New England
Looked around for ideas but didn't see anything on the site so I broadened my search to the web. I didn't want to spend a lot so decided to build my own. I found a few different design ideas for making one out of 1- 10' length of 1" PVC pipe and a few fittings, 5/8" threaded rod for the axle and 2- 10" wheels from Harbor Freight. I changed some dimensions from what I'd seen to better accommodate my Sportspal 13' canoe. This will carry it rightside up or flipped over on the cross brace (which I supported with a wooden dowel). I'll use the 'flipped over' for outside storage. As light as my canoe is there are times when it's a hike to the launch site. This should make transporting it a little easier by supporting the back end for me to roll it around. Total cost was about $35.00 and would have been a little less if I'd had a Harbor Freight discount card for the wheels. As it was they were $6 each instead of the discounted $4. It was actually a fun little project, looking forward to putting it to use-



IMG_2247.JPG
 

photoguy

Well-known member
Messages
718
Reaction score
121
Location
New England
It's 11.5 lbs. I'd guess that the wheels are half of that weight.I thought about lighter plastic hub wheels but didn't see anything in the timeframe that I was making this and I liked the idea of the air tires. I made the 'wings' 34" wide to fit the gunwale of the canoe and this has an overall height of 17" so the the canoe is basically level whenI lift the other end. One other idea I saw was to make the axle out of copper pipe and use a clevis pin to hold the wheels so it would more easily break down a little. I didn't go that route and used a threaded steel rod with nylon lock nuts. This will easily fit in my canoe but I'm thinking I'll probably put it back in the truck when I go to grab the motor and then reverse that procedure on the way out.
 

trev

Well-known member
Messages
3,136
Reaction score
1,780
Location
south of Joplin
I was thinking more in terms of one way floats, using shuttle or two vehicles. It looks pretty functional, but for outside storage I wonder if the sun will damage it.
 
Last edited:

photoguy

Well-known member
Messages
718
Reaction score
121
Location
New England
I was thinking more in terms of one floats, using shuttle or two vehicles. It looks pretty functional, but for outside storage I wonder if the sun will damage it.
I suppose sun damage is a possibility. It’s PVC and I painted it so I guess I’ll just have to try it to know. Also when the canoe is flipped it’s pretty well covered...but for short money it just might do the trick. I had looked around and there are some neat folding ones available commercially. (And look light weight) but they are hundred$ and I did t want to spend quite that much.
 

JoJer

Well-known member
Messages
3,082
Reaction score
415
Location
Boise, Idaho
I built one for my 16' Coleman. I aimed at heavier-duty because it was going to be carrying the canoe full of guns, decoys, etc. Mine was made of wood, used HF wheels in brackets, weighs about 40 lbs. I generally returned mine to the truck when the boat came off, though I sometimes considered just dropping it in the water, aways off the beach, with a float to mark it. I have kept it in the canoe when I was by myself to help trim the boat. The boat sat just forward of midship on the carrier, and was held on with a lever tie-down across the boat to eye-bolts at the outside edges of the carrier. I'd arrange the weight so the bow would stay up. Some of the material it is made of was plywood and outside storage has taken it's toll. I have a couple of pieces of composite decking I got at the reuseit store to build the next one.

 
Last edited:

dakotakid

Well-known member
Messages
604
Reaction score
13
Location
FL and MI
Photoguy,

Nice job on the canoe/kayak caddy. I do have a fairly inexpensive suggestion.

When you are pushing or pulling the kayak or canoe on the caddy, if you hit a rut or hole, you the caddy is likely to get stuck and you'll then pull the vessel off of it. One way to avoid this problem is to strap the vessel to the caddy. You can do that a number of ways, but if you are looking for a premade product, consider the replacement strap sold for C-Tug caddies. It's only $12 plus tax and shipping.

I have a C-Tug. Like it a lot, but it is expensive. It's great for me because there are no metal parts to rust, as I use it on fresh and saltwater fishing excursions. Without a good strap system, I would be totally frustrated trying to keep a kayak on the cart.

Good luck!
 

photoguy

Well-known member
Messages
718
Reaction score
121
Location
New England
^thats a great suggestion. I was planning on using a tie down or bungee but I like that idea. Thx-

I went back and forth on the C tug- I really liked the features. Was going to buy one but then had the idea of trying to build something. I may get one if this homemade thing doesn’t work out and if I find that a caddy makes my canoe life better ;)
 

photoguy

Well-known member
Messages
718
Reaction score
121
Location
New England
I built one for my 16' Coleman. I aimed at heavier-duty because it was going to be carrying the canoe full of guns, decoys, etc. Mine was made of wood, used HF wheels in brackets, weighs about 40 lbs. I generally returned mine to the truck when the boat came off, though I sometimes considered just dropping it in the water, aways off the beach, with a float to mark it. I have kept it in the canoe when I was by myself to help trim the boat. The boat sat just forward of midship on the carrier, and was held on with a lever tie-down across the boat to eye-bolts at the outside edges of the carrier. I'd arrange the weight so the bow would stay up. Some of the material it is made of was plywood and outside storage has taken it's toll. I have a couple of pieces of composite decking I got at the reuseit store to build the next one.

That’s a pretty heavy duty rig! My canoe weighs about the same as your caddy-about 50lbs :)
 

JoJer

Well-known member
Messages
3,082
Reaction score
415
Location
Boise, Idaho
Google tells me the Coleman (made of HDPE) weighs 81 lbs. It's the red-headed step child of the canoe world. You don't have to look far to find a site that has lots of fun at the expense of the black/red/green boats. I'm OK with that. It's a barge, it takes a week to turn it, etc. OTH, they are (practically ) indestructable. I discovered a weakness by dragging mine across paved and graveled parking lots. (Only) 20 years of that and I wore hole through both ends. Easy, but time consuming to fix. This boat was almost that old when I bought it used from a coworker for $180. It has a big chunk of foam in each end and an a tublular aluminum frame. It will swamp but it won't sink. My son and his friend used to swamp it and use it for a diving platform. I saw a picture of a Coleman canoe destroyed by being bent around bridge piling by current, I saw one bent in half at the outside bottom (someone jumped up and down on it) my friend bought it, replaced the frame and swapped for a table saw. So, really, a lot of fun for the price.
It does not slide off the carrier, I can ratchet it down pretty tight. I used to use a pair of friction straps, one per side to the eye bolts, but a single ratchet works pretty good.
 

falconer57

Well-known member
Messages
193
Reaction score
81
Location
Sheridan, WY
I have a commercial model, forget the brand. Very handy to load right-side-up and fill with gear. Tires big enough to handle sand is a good idea. Yeah, strap it to the tug or you'll be pulling it off all the time.
 

photoguy

Well-known member
Messages
718
Reaction score
121
Location
New England
Just a quick update (since the caddy was built while the canoe was stillhanging in the garage rafters for winter storage). It works like a charm! And as a bonus I can keep it attached while the canoe is loaded in the truck. Still working out the means to tie the canoe down on it and just using a nylon rope in the meantime. And the 'wings' you see on the side are to allow me to flip the canoe over and store it upside down.

 

JoJer

Well-known member
Messages
3,082
Reaction score
415
Location
Boise, Idaho
Just a quick update (since the caddy was built while the canoe was stillhanging in the garage rafters for winter storage). It works like a charm! And as a bonus I can keep it attached while the canoe is loaded in the truck. Still working out the means to tie the canoe down on it and just using a nylon rope in the meantime. And the 'wings' you see on the side are to allow me to flip the canoe over and store it upside down.

My carrier was too heavy to let dangle that way: It'd bend the boat. I hauled mine in the back of an 8' bed and the new(er) truck is only 6', so, about 9' of canoe hanging out the back. I had 2 2x6x8's joined about a foot apart by steel angle. Between the steel and the boat 1/4 plastic cut from an old cutting board. This contraption was centered under the boat for support and the rack and boat were both tied with ratchet straps to the truck. I always expected to get pulled over, but never was. I built a set of seats from 2x4's that let me lay in the bottom of the boat (above the bilge), then push with my feet to sit up (and shoot ducks). OK prototype, #02 should have been made with lighter materials. I tossed the boat in with those seats without supporting it correctly and bent the center thwart. Got lucky and found the right extruded tubing at the recycler.
 

photoguy

Well-known member
Messages
718
Reaction score
121
Location
New England
My carrier was too heavy to let dangle that way: It'd bend the boat. I hauled mine in the back of an 8' bed and the new(er) truck is only 6', so, about 9' of canoe hanging out the back. I had 2 2x6x8's joined about a foot apart by steel angle. Between the steel and the boat 1/4 plastic cut from an old cutting board. This contraption was centered under the boat for support and the rack and boat were both tied with ratchet straps to the truck. I always expected to get pulled over, but never was. I built a set of seats from 2x4's that let me lay in the bottom of the boat (above the bilge), then push with my feet to sit up (and shoot ducks). OK prototype, #02 should have been made with lighter materials. I tossed the boat in with those seats without supporting it correctly and bent the center thwart. Got lucky and found the right extruded tubing at the recycler.
I think I have a 5 of so foot overhang. According to the dmv website, as long as I hang a red flag I'm good to go on the road. I always wonder f I'm going to get puled over, but never have (yet!).
 

JoJer

Well-known member
Messages
3,082
Reaction score
415
Location
Boise, Idaho
I think I have a 5 of so foot overhang. According to the dmv website, as long as I hang a red flag I'm good to go on the road. I always wonder f I'm going to get puled over, but never have (yet!).
I bought a one of those lights that fit into the hitch receiver and plug into the trailer light harness. Added some wire and a clamp(? duct tape?) to put on the end of the boat since to and fro for ducks is in the dark. It made two trips, quit working and I never tried to fix or use it again. Just a red flag-actually, an orange vest I kept in the truck for my youth hunters.
 
Top