Casting difference 8 wt. vs 9 wt.

Bonedaddy

Member
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Location
Kentucky
Needing to add a second saltwater outfit. Currently have an 8 wt., considering getting a 9 wt. My question, will there be much of a casting difference? I don't want a broom handle. All things being equal, if both were the same brand and model is there a noticeable casting difference.

New to the site, and appreciate everyone's thoughts.
 

bigjim5589

Well-known member
Messages
3,416
Reaction score
57
Location
Manning, S. C. (formerly MD)
Every person notices different things while casting a fly rod, so whether or not you will notice a difference, only you can determine.

I have an 8 wt & 10 wt in the same model, and yes, there's a noticeable difference, but IMO, only because there are weight differences. My 10 wt outfit is heavier than the 8 wt outfit.

I also have a couple of 9 wt's, although not the same brand/model, and do notice differences from casting those other rods. Again, mostly due to weight of the lines, and of the rod & reels themselves.

Otherwise, I can't say I pay much attention to how each rod casts, compared to the others, when I'm out fishing. Each stands alone, for the use that I give them, and is not even something I think about. They each do what I need from them. For me, it's like picking up a 16 oz hammer or a 20 oz hammer, I feel the weight difference, but each pounds a nail in similar manner without having to think about it.

You do have to always consider the flies that you'll use with each weight rod. Given the same fly, because of line mass, a 9 wt should cast easier than the 8 wt, in theory, but whether or not it does would still be up to your interpretation. The 9 wt should allow you to cast larger/heavier flies than the 8 wt.

You can certainly use a 9 wt line on the 8 wt, and whether it would cast the same or differently than on a 9 wt. rod, that might be a better comparison.

My reason for adding a 10 wt rod to my collection, was because it allowed me to cast larger or heavier flies than either the 8 or 9 wt rods that I had. Generally, I used the 8 & 9 wt's interchangeably. I added the 9 wt. rods, primarily because I got them at good prices and they were intended for my son's to use. They just got added to what I use as another option, and really were not a "need".

If I only had the 8 wt., and was needing to add a heavier rod, I would go to the 10 wt, and skip the 9. But, that's just me.
 

karstopo

Well-known member
Messages
2,793
Reaction score
29
Location
Brazoria County, SE Texas
I have the G.Loomis 7/8 and 8/9 weight Short Stix Rods. Fished both this morning. Started off with the 8/9 just because it had the right fly on. Would have stayed with that rod, but unfortunately, I broke it. That’s another story, though.

Switched over to the 7/8 weight. Put the fly I had on the 8/9 on the 7/8. Fly line was identical, but true to each weight so that the 8/9 had 9 weight line and the 7/8 had 8 weight line.

Could I tell the difference on the cast? Not really. It was almost dead calm. I was waist deep in water. As the situation was, it didn’t make a lot of difference. It might of been different with a heavier fly or in heavy wind or casting from a boat deck.
 

flafly14

Well-known member
Messages
222
Reaction score
7
Location
FL
Hi Bone. Welcome to the site.

I think whether you get a #9 or a #10 would depend on what you want to do with it....

If you want a second rod to serve as a backup for your #8, then get the #9. It'll probably be a lot nicer than a #10 for blind casting all day.

But if you want a rod specifically for some purpose (like maybe for tarpon on the flats, or whatever), then get the #10 or #11 or whichever rod that purpose calls for.
 

Bonedaddy

Member
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Location
Kentucky
Hi Bone. Welcome to the site.

I think whether you get a #9 or a #10 would depend on what you want to do with it....

If you want a second rod to serve as a backup for your #8, then get the #9. It'll probably be a lot nicer than a #10 for blind casting all day.

But if you want a rod specifically for some purpose (like maybe for tarpon on the flats, or whatever), then get the #10 or #11 or whichever rod that purpose calls for.
Thank you all for your responses. I don't have a fly shop close where I could go cast, so I have to order online. I did order a 9 wt. Good prices on Scott Meridian now that it's being discontinued. Looking forward to spending time on this forum.
 

osseous

Well-known member
Messages
1,340
Reaction score
61
That's a GREAT choice! In general terms, 10wt is the transition to more of a big game, fighting tool. 9wt is the top of the casting/presentation scale. This is a generalization of course- but I think you will really enjoy what you can do with your 9wt

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Location
Tampa Bay
I too purchased the Scott 9 wt. I casts very well, but like someone above said each rod has it's own feel. I have two of several top end rods and even then they feel slightly different.
 

Bonedaddy

Member
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Location
Kentucky
Thank you. I am anxiously awaiting it's arrival. Don't have a fly shop close by, so I have to order online without an opportunity to cast first. I did a lot of research on the Meridian and it got lots of high marks. I do more trout fishing than I get to do salt, just based on where I live. What led to my question was that I just didn't want to feel like I had a broom handle in my hand. I appreciate the input that I've gotten.
 

Flyrod Buddy

Well-known member
Messages
234
Reaction score
7
Location
San Antonio, TX
I have an Orvis H2 8wt and a recon 10wt, I bought a Echo BAG Quickshot in a 7wt and 9wt cuz of money refund on paypal. I would have bought an 8wt Superfine Glass Rod but didn’t realize they had one till it was too late. Too me the Echos are excellent rods but so is the Superfine Glass 8wt, the difference between the Echo and the ORvis Superfine is the Echos are slightly over engineered and a little heavier. But they cast great and can cast the 9wt all day and the 7wt longer, if you want a second rod outfit consider these I have mentioned. They will cast small salt flies effortlessly a pretty good distance. I like doing wind cast better with glass rods they load up real nice.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

brokeoff

Well-known member
Messages
461
Reaction score
3
Thank you. I am anxiously awaiting it's arrival. Don't have a fly shop close by, so I have to order online without an opportunity to cast first. I did a lot of research on the Meridian and it got lots of high marks. I do more trout fishing than I get to do salt, just based on where I live. What led to my question was that I just didn't want to feel like I had a broom handle in my hand. I appreciate the input that I've gotten.
Where did you order from? I know of at least three shops with good online presence that will ship rods to you and let you try them out. If you don’t like them send them back. With one shop they sent me two rods I was thinking about and let me keep the one I liked better.
 

sweetandsalt

Well-known member
Messages
11,264
Reaction score
143
Location
-
OP, Welcome to the Forum. Might I surmise from your name you are using these rods to pursue bonefish? It is my preference on the tropical flats to have a #7, 2 8-weights and a #9 rigged, usually rods from differing designer/makers as I seek diverse rod "personalities". The 7-weigfht will be rigged with a sparse, smaller shrimp fly for really skinny water, the 8's, one fast the other very fast will have two different lines and flies to match to depth and wind conditions and the #9 will be the most aggressive for a larger, heavier crab fly for deep flats or if a permit materializes. Each has its place and each gets used most every angling day.

For your new Meridian I suggest RIO's Direct Core Bonefish line and if you also intend to score a great 8-weight on close out, G-Loomis's NRX is also at discount.
 

hatidua

Well-known member
Messages
303
Reaction score
33
Location
colorado
if both were the same brand and model is there a noticeable casting difference.
Depends if they are rolled off the same mandrel. As an example, the difference between a Sage RPLXi 7/8/9/10 was a very gradual increase but the difference between the 10/11 was huge. The 11/12/13 were close but the 14 was a pool cue.

If it's just a case of insurance in the event of breakage, I'd get the same rod you have in duplicate. Back when I did 3-4 trips a year to Belize I took three identical 8wt rods, there aren't many fish in Belize that can't be handled with an 8wt (sadly) and I liked a specific rod so I just took spares of the same.

if it's to have access to a heavier stick, go have your local shop string up a bunch of different rods and see which your arm likes. I would not succumb to brand loyalty in this pursuit if you are picking a different rod than what you already have. Let your casting arm decide.
 

Bonedaddy

Member
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Location
Kentucky
Quick update: I ended up purchasing a 9' 9wt. Meridian and paired it with a Tibor Everglades. Also added a new 8 wt. to the quiver, Winston B3 Plus. Thank goodness both rods were being discontinued and significantly discounted.
 
Top