Changing Rods

LOC

Well-known member
Messages
294
Reaction score
149
Location
S. CA
LOC, I am a retired engineer. Please don’t hold that against me but by nature and education I over think and analyze everything. I consider almost every cast, what went wrong and what went right trying to determine the best course for the best result. I fished single-handed and long-handled bait casters 5-7’ long for many years and could adapt between them in a single outing so I’m sure I can figure this out, especially with all the great help and advice I’m getting on this forum.

Thanks to all.

One of my favorite guys to fish with is a electrical engineer.
Heading down a river doing recon he's telling me to write down odometer readings and milage markers and I'm telling him just remember the big tree. lol
 

osseous

Well-known member
Messages
1,587
Reaction score
258
Mr Engineer- See if this makes sense: if you have a curve in your backcast, you cannot load the rod on the forward cast until your stroke has straightened that curve... only when your rod is pulling against a straight flyline can its weight be acted upon.

Our joints and opposing musculature lead to curved backcasts. You must recognize and correct for this with your backcast stroke until you are throwing straight backcasts. At that point, you will feel load in any flyrod, with any line

Sent from my SM-N986U1 using Tapatalk
 

tcorfey

Well-known member
Messages
1,746
Reaction score
245
Location
SF Bay area California
Rest assured that Recon in 6wt is a very good rod. I have one and I can cast anything from a 4wt to an 8wt line with it. What I use it for is mostly unweighted streamers so I use a Salmon Steelhead line taper in 6wt. My line is from Rio but several manufacturers make a line for this purpose.

If you put in some time on your timing and technique and let the rod do the work, don't try to force it, you will be fine.

You could try this exercise. Let out about 15 of of line and perform a side armed cast for your forward and back cast. make sure the rod and especially the tip has a flat trajectory. Now you can see the rod and the line during the cast. Vary your speed and timing to see how it affects the rod, then slowly increase the amount of line you have out. Notice any changes? After you understand the speed and timing you need to make the rod work for you, switch back to an overhead cast and try to repeat what you just learned. Remember the rod tip must always follow a straight path and don't allow your line to become slack during the stroke or when in transition from backward to forward cast but, you must allow the fly to finish it's backward trajectory before you start your forward cast. You need to time it so the forward cast begins just at the point where they fly reaches it's maximum distance behind you and do not creep forward in anticipation, you need to make decisive movements. Start slow, accelerate, stop, wait, accelerate the opposite direction, stop, wait, etc...

Hope that helps...
 

boisker

Well-known member
Messages
631
Reaction score
62
Location
Devon, UK
I should just stick with it. You’ve been fishing / casting 10 months and appear to have made good headway with your 5w. The 6w will feel different and take a little while to tune into (especially when you are not used to trying different weight rods, models, makes).... the 6w is obviously a different weight and the characteristics of the model will make a huge difference... it won’t feel the same as your 5w, principally because it isn’t... and it never will feel the same. But stick with practicing with it and you’ll get more familiar with its characteristics and more confident with it.
in time and with more experience you’ll decide whether the characteristics of that 6w are for you or not...
 

half fast

Well-known member
Messages
241
Reaction score
57
Location
Central Florida
LOC, I am a retired engineer. Please don’t hold that against me but by nature and education I over think and analyze everything. I consider almost every cast, what went wrong and what went right trying to determine the best course for the best result. I fished single-handed and long-handled bait casters 5-7’ long for many years and could adapt between them in a single outing so I’m sure I can figure this out, especially with all the great help and advice I’m getting on this forum.

Thanks to all.

I'll be joining you in a few weeks! I'm about to become a retired engineer after 36 years practicing in the defense industry.

Want a suggestion from another over-analytic geek? Get off the lawn and go fishing. With the added elements of actual fishing distracting you, you'll possibly stop overthinking the cast and it will begin to come to you naturally. At the very least it will put some fun back into it.
 

Txbart

Well-known member
Messages
81
Reaction score
33
Location
Texas
I know changing lines won’t shorten my learning curve but it seems logical that Clearwater and Recon rods are so different that they should require different lines. I talked to my latest instructor, who is also an Orvis Fly Fishing manager, he suggested I try Bank Shot, 23.5’ head. Chatted with Orvis Outfitter this morning, he suggested Pro Power Taper, 50’ compound head. I said a 50’ head will not change things for me if part of my issue with the Hydros Trout is the 49.5’ head. He said the double taper in the Power Taper behaves completely different than the taper on the Hydros. I think Bank Shot may not be as versatile as I want. Sounds Power Taper will do what a want and be a discriminator for my rods, 5wt for smaller fish/flies and 6wt for bigger flies/fish and longer casts.

I looked at Rio Creek that was recommenced on this thread. Sounds like the same type line as Orvis Bank Shot.
 

jayr

Well-known member
Messages
1,693
Reaction score
204
Location
Knoxville, TN
I know changing lines won’t shorten my learning curve but it seems logical that Clearwater and Recon rods are so different that they should require different lines. I talked to my latest instructor, who is also an Orvis Fly Fishing manager, he suggested I try Bank Shot, 23.5’ head. Chatted with Orvis Outfitter this morning, he suggested Pro Power Taper, 50’ compound head. I said a 50’ head will not change things for me if part of my issue with the Hydros Trout is the 49.5’ head. He said the double taper in the Power Taper behaves completely different than the taper on the Hydros. I think Bank Shot may not be as versatile as I want. Sounds Power Taper will do what a want and be a discriminator for my rods, 5wt for smaller fish/flies and 6wt for bigger flies/fish and longer casts.

I looked at Rio Creek that was recommenced on this thread. Sounds like the same type line as Orvis Bank Shot.
Before you go buy another line see below:

My question would be, and maybe you have already answered it so forgive my asking again, what is your intended target species?

Size of stream or river you intend to spend the most time?

What rig are you primarily going to throw with it? Dry, dry dropper, streamer, double indicator, etc. ?
 

Txbart

Well-known member
Messages
81
Reaction score
33
Location
Texas
I plan to fish trout in the fall, winter and spring. Stockers while in Texas variety when I travel to the northwest. Most of summer is spent in Texas so that will be bass time. I like a dries, dry/dropper or stimulator/dropper. The only streamer type fly I have thrown is woolly buggers and clowsers but I want to expand. My sons like indicators, I have some in my vest but have yet to use them.

I plan to use my Clearwater 5wt for most of my trout fishing and my Recon 6wt for “bigger” fishing which includes bass, bigger trout and bigger water.
 
Last edited:

jayr

Well-known member
Messages
1,693
Reaction score
204
Location
Knoxville, TN
I have the discontinued Recon 906. For dries and dry dropper I have SA Mastery MPX and it does well. For throwing double nymph indicator rigs I have the AirFlo nymph line designed by Kelly Galloup and it absolutely hammers them. I get a lot of distance and those AirFlo lines are super slick. I would also think for dries and dry droppers the AirFlo lines Super Dri Elite and River and Stream would do very well.

I have gotten away from Rio lines due to issues I, and others I have talked to have had. My two go to line companies are AirFlo and SA.
 

Unknownflyman

Well-known member
Messages
3,143
Reaction score
428
Location
L'Étoile du Nord
LOC, I am a retired engineer. Please don’t hold that against me but by nature and education I over think and analyze everything. I consider almost every cast, what went wrong and what went right trying to determine the best course for the best result. I fished single-handed and long-handled bait casters 5-7’ long for many years and could adapt between them in a single outing so I’m sure I can figure this out, especially with all the great help and advice I’m getting on this forum.

Thanks to all.
If you do that, you will get really good fairly quickly, you will be keeping an eye on not ingraining bad habits into your casting stroke. Its easy to do, even over time Ive picked up some bad habits being lazy, and when my casting starts coming apart a bit, I have to re group and focus, get everything working again.
 

rangerrich99

Well-known member
Messages
1,532
Reaction score
114
Location
Anthem, AZ
Most likely the problem is that you're inexperienced. You just need to keep practicing.

Many years ago when I was still new to ff, I bought a 3 wt., and then the following week I tried to go fishing with it. Well, the day was mostly a disaster. Lots of tailing loops, I couldn't cast farther than about 2o feet, and half the time the leader wouldn't lay out straight, etc.

It wasn't until the very end of the day, about a half hour before sunset, after what was probably several hundred if not a thousand casts, that I finally got some good casts in. The reason? I was tired. I was so tired that I was pretty much just going through the motions, literally. But that's what I was doing wrong all day. I was trying to muscle the rod, and what it needed was a very light touch instead. Once I got tired, and I was just using enough muscle to lift the line on the back cast, then pausing for a second or two before gently pushing forward into the front cast, the rod did what it was made to do and it cast the line beautifully.

After that it still took several weeks of practice before I could consistently cast my 3 wt. adequately. But I did figure it out.

Right now you're trying to cast the 6 wt. as if it were a 5 wt., and it's not working. Keep practicing, learn just how firm you have to be with each rod and you'll cast both rods equally well. It's just going to take some time and effort.

Good luck.
 

rob bishline

Member
Messages
21
Reaction score
20
Location
Tulsa, Oklahoma
All good advice above . One thing I’ll mention is the importance of the leader . You might have already taken it in account but I didn’t see it mentioned.
I remember taking a friend fishing once who had done a little fly fishing but had never thrown any streamers.

We spent part of the morning throwing smaller flies and I noticed his casting looked really good from downstream.. nice tight loops and good distance.

We switched to streamers and it became obvious he was really struggling.
I looked at his set up and his leader and tippet were way too light for the streamers we were throwing.

I set his Clearwater 9’ 6wt. With the appropriate streamer leader and he couldn’t believe the difference.
his casting and distance improved dramatically.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Top