Connecting The Backing To Your Reel Spool;

thomasw

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Well reading through this thread has me laughing about my good friend and his hooking a large spring salmon on a 6 wt rod about 21 years ago. We were casting flies for sockeye salmon -- generally in the 3 to 6 lb range -- and he managed to connect with a very large spring -- likely ~30lbs. The third run brought this to end; Kurt's arbour knot broke and his entire backing and fly line went down the river. Since witnessing my friend's loss, I have been using this very uni-knot that Ard recommends --- and, not surprisingly, so has my friend :)
 

Ard

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Oh I don't think for a second that the knot would have changed the results for your friend. There are only two ways I've found that can curtair a bitter end like that are: 1. you run like the devil to keep up or 2. you face reality and point the rod at the fish and put the clamps to the reel before it's too late. Mind you that your backing strength must be more than that of the leader ;)
 

sweetandsalt

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This method is all fine and good, however, being S&S, I am "compelled" to add a detail or two.

This was done with rope for visibility and Dacron backing is thin stuff. I form a double line by making a 12 to 18" long (even longer for a large arbor reel) surgeons loop in the backing. Then tie another micro surgeons loop at the tip of the loop (1/8" no more). Then, as in the video, go around the arbor twice, take the tag with the micro loop knot around the doubled standing line not six but two or three times. Slowly tightening, I allow the micro "lock" knot to slide down and lock against the doubled assembly insuring that, even if Leviathan spools you, the knot can not slip open and, being doubled, is stronger that the standing backing so it won't bust at the reel. In the extreme, something has to give...may it not be the full rigging's attachment to the reel!

My version of the video's standard fly shop method is conceptually stronger due to the line doubling and lock knot and I wish I could tell you it has stood the test of time against the wrath of many a giant specimen. NEVER have I been completely spooled. There have been a handful of close calls, each with a grandiose story connected to it, but never have I come tight to this knot with an angry fish on the other end. I like a lot of backing, even on my trout reels 100+ yards is normal for me and twice that in the salt. By the time any fish gets that far away from you in some unusual environment, something else is likely to give before you get to the end of your string. Still, I go for the extra strength just in case it ever happens. In a way, I look forward to it.
My post from page 1 in this thread still stands for me. The doubling of the backing prior to Arbor Knotting is an insurance policy I employ even on a light line outfit. Still, I have never gotten to test it and, when circumstances have suggested I was going to, I did as Ard proposed and pointed the rod and clamped down.
 

JoJer

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Any tips on how to transfer line and backing from an existing reel to a new one? I did it with my 4wt a couple months ago and have brand new 6wt reel sitting in the box because the other was such a pain. Or maybe I'm just lazy.
Lots of folks here recommend a commercial line winder. They're cheap-$15.- and are made for this task. I use some variations on a drill motor and spool holder.
For transferring the line to a new reel, I put a bolt,washer, old line spool, washer, and nut in the drill chuck. Set the spool with the line on it in a small box fixed so it can't move. Fire up the drill and move the line to the old spool-something big enough to hold the flyline and backing.
Do you know if the old line and backing will properly fill the new reel spool? If so, you're golden. If not, you'll want to reverse the old line on another spool so you can put the line on the new reel spool flyline first, the add the propper amount of backing, reverse it again and load the line backing first.
I did build a jig once that used a drill motor with a rubber covered bolt set to turn the reel spool while it's on the reel. Mostly cause I didn't want to crank a 9 wt spey line by hand.

Another easy variation: Take all the moving parts to your favorite shop (fly shop or big box) and ask them to do it for you. Generally they're happy to do it.
 
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jpielock1992

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Am I missing something? You basically need 2 knots a slip knot and a surgeons knot,nothing more nor less. We are not sailing around the globe in a schooner,we're trying to catch some fish! Wishin to be fishin, actally just was and there was a mayfly/caddis hatch...FUN, Chet
 

JoJer

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When it's time for the final loading on the reel, I tension the line/backing by running it between the pages of a fat HB book and guide it level by hand. My McCLanes's Standard Fishing Encyclopedia works well.
 
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