Cork Fly Rod Handles...

ed from bama

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good afternoon to all-

My father's hammer is in my tool box. It, along with all of his hand tools, I inherited when he died. He's been gone now for a long time, but the old hammer- I use it quite often- still carries the marks and stains where his hand gripped it. He used that hammer for as long as I knew him, and that was a long time. My hand holds the hammer differently, and I can see his hand on the hammer every time I use it. He left his mark on that hammer.
So what does this have to do with the topic?
My favorite fly rod- it's an eight foot long 3 weight rod I made some time ago- has a very nice light colored cork handle. Very comfortable, fits my hand well, and I can use that rod all day long with no need to flex my hand to relieve cramps. And that cork fly rod handle carries my hand print as surely as my dad's hammer carries his.
Through many fishing trips, that cork handle has been gripped by my hand with suntan oil, outboard motor lubricants, some on the water meal leavings, and yes, occasionally a little fish slime and blood. That fly rod handle is MY hand tool, and my handprint marks it as mine for ever.
At least until one of my sons gets it.

good day to all- Ed
 

bumble54

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I have my late fathers spade, bought when he really couldn't afford it. Made in the old way by forging two thin steel sheets back to back so that it is a double layer of steel. Makes the spade lightweight but tough. the cutting edge is a funny shape after all these years but it's the only spade I use. I've bought others over the years but gave them away as they just aren't as nice to use. Still got the wood dowel repair my father did to the handle. I bears every mark he put on it.
Odd the things we become attached to, the only Christmas present from the past I still own is a pin cushion ( for my sewing box ) my niece made when she was 6 years old, over "cough, cough" years ago. ( too much of a gentleman to reveal a ladies true age don't you know ).
 

ed from bama

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Good morning to all-

bumble54- Perhaps we may call kin in some sort of backhand way. My wife's ancestor came over here from Sheffield- her grandfather was a racing horse groom and his horse won a big race and with the money he earned, he immigrated to the US. She is two generations removed from Sheffield. Her family name was "Harvey".
Interesting the connections the world gives us, now isn't it?

good day to all- Ed
 

Rip Tide

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In this picture, the top and middle rods belonged to my grandfather
If you look closely at the thumb indentation on the top rod, you can see a few fish scales.
The last time that he used that rod was probably 1964/65

IMGP0024.JPG
 

bumble54

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Good morning to all-

bumble54- Perhaps we may call kin in some sort of backhand way. My wife's ancestor came over here from Sheffield- her grandfather was a racing horse groom and his horse won a big race and with the money he earned, he immigrated to the US. She is two generations removed from Sheffield. Her family name was "Harvey".
Interesting the connections the world gives us, now isn't it?

good day to all- Ed
Strangely enough our family also has ancestors who emigrated to The United States and Canada, my grandfathers Scottish cousins all went to Canada and grandma's Irish relatives ended up in California, one went into motion pictures I believe, the silent movies or so I am told, never found out their stage name or if they were ever a success but their family name was Broderick.
 
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alredygon
If you are familiar with the concept of Entropy, you probably recognize that the day you die, all that gear will dissipate like Cottonwood fluff in a spring wind. Regrettably, all the stories and memories will disappear as well. The great trips, the big fish, the humor and beauty of an anglers life.
Someone will gain several thousands of dollars in fly tying gear, and associated tackle when I am gone. And not another dedicated angler in my family!
I really need an acolyte!
 

ed from bama

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Good evening to all-
ItsJust fishing- Oh, I don't know. I like to think a little bit of my fishing life will live on.

This idea is one of the main reasons I enjoy writing my articles for different magazines in which I share what I see and do and have learned through my time on the water. I will agree that not much of what I've learned will live on, but maybe, some of my experiences will inspire some other angler to try to see what I've seen.
I think this concept of shared knowledge and continued experience is basic to who I am. I was a public school teacher for nearly 40 years,and if a person professing to be a teacher doesn't believe in the concept of continued knowledge and learning from others,then that person just might not belong in front of a class.
And as far as my fishing gear goes, I really expect that someone- either my sons or someone else, will get that stuff and will use it- maybe better than I have done.
The older I get, the more I believe that things will work out the way they are supposed to- even if we don't understand it all at the time.

Good night to all- Ed
 
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alredygon
In all honesty? I have no idea! It seems the older I get, the less I actually know and understand. So I try to focus on the things I do know, and fishing is high on that list. The rest I just try and not let it bother me. I share your perception of continued knowledge and learning, as I am still trying to acquire new skills. For my own benefit, if nothing else.
Best wishes!
 
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