Cut Throat Trout Pics

LePetomane

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Little Yellowstone Cutt on a Klinkhammer
Very nice. You didn’t catch that one in Ohio. It in nice to see another fan of the Klinkhamer. The thing that I have found is that the hooks run large so it’s best to buy then in person rather than order online.
 

dolomieu

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Very nice. You didn’t catch that one in Ohio. It in nice to see another fan of the Klinkhamer. The thing that I have found is that the hooks run large so it’s best to buy then in person rather than order online.
You are right LePetomane! That one was way up in the Northeast section of the Park. I think it was a size 14 bought at a local outfitter in Montana where we stayed.
 

Chris_in_Louisiana

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No trips west this summer, but here are a few Cutties from CO last year.

A big Trico sipping Snake River Cutt from Eleven Mile Canyon


A little Colorado Cutt from the IPWA


And a Greenback from RMNP


Hoping I can get on a few more Cutts next summer assuming life returns to "normal."

Chris
 

justahack

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Two Cutthroats from this summer. I think they are Greenback Cutthroats, but I’m not positive. Can anyone confirm?View attachment 30242
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Generally speaking it's not possible to say without counting scales or looking at DNA. Even then it's tough. Lots of bucket brigades over the past 100+ years. For Colorado, I usually default to classification based on geography. Anything in the Colorado drainage (west slope) is probably a Colorado River Cutthroat. Anything from the upper Arkansas and Platte drainages is probably a greenback, and anything from the Rio Grande drainage (south slope) is probably a Rio Grande cutthroat. Talking mostly montane, subalpine and alpine lakes and streams for all that. Over the years, the state has contributed to mixing stocks and also stocks Snake River cutthroat into more heavily pressured waters, especially drive up reservoirs and tail waters. Many years back, I worked on electrofishing crews where the goal was to locate "pure strain" populations. We'd first look at spotting patterns to identify which ones merited more confirmatory follow up. If the spots were nearly circular, we'd say Colorado River or Rio Grande depending on size of spots. RG spots were larger and more sparse than CR. If the spots were more globular and scattered across the flanks, like those in your photos, we'd say greenback. Spots on Snake River cutthroat are much finer - looks like someone shook pepper on their tails. The state recognizes a couple different strains of CR and GB. What we call "pure" greenbacks were probably originally only in the upper south platte drainage, even though the last remnant population (Bear Creek) was in the Arkansas drainage. The extinct yellowfin cutthroat was thought to be the native variety in the upper Arkansas drainage where it was last seen in Twin Lakes. It got big, like 10#. Some think it was just as likely a variant of either CR or GB because lots of other trout and char were also stocked there well before record keeping. These days, the state stocks a few different strains of greenback cutthroat in the high elevation lakes and streams of the Arkansas, South Platte, and North Platte drainages, various Colorado River cutthroat on the west slope, and the only known strain of Rio Grande in the Rio Grande drainage. So using geography to say which type we caught is probably good enough.

I suppose none of this is relevant if you caught those trout outside of Colorado. Nice fish by the way. Couple of real beauties.
 

pcalitre

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Generally speaking it's not possible to say without counting scales or looking at DNA. Even then it's tough. Lots of bucket brigades over the past 100+ years. For Colorado, I usually default to classification based on geography. Anything in the Colorado drainage (west slope) is probably a Colorado River Cutthroat. Anything from the upper Arkansas and Platte drainages is probably a greenback, and anything from the Rio Grande drainage (south slope) is probably a Rio Grande cutthroat. Talking mostly montane, subalpine and alpine lakes and streams for all that. Over the years, the state has contributed to mixing stocks and also stocks Snake River cutthroat into more heavily pressured waters, especially drive up reservoirs and tail waters. Many years back, I worked on electrofishing crews where the goal was to locate "pure strain" populations. We'd first look at spotting patterns to identify which ones merited more confirmatory follow up. If the spots were nearly circular, we'd say Colorado River or Rio Grande depending on size of spots. RG spots were larger and more sparse than CR. If the spots were more globular and scattered across the flanks, like those in your photos, we'd say greenback. Spots on Snake River cutthroat are much finer - looks like someone shook pepper on their tails. The state recognizes a couple different strains of CR and GB. What we call "pure" greenbacks were probably originally only in the upper south platte drainage, even though the last remnant population (Bear Creek) was in the Arkansas drainage. The extinct yellowfin cutthroat was thought to be the native variety in the upper Arkansas drainage where it was last seen in Twin Lakes. It got big, like 10#. Some think it was just as likely a variant of either CR or GB because lots of other trout and char were also stocked there well before record keeping. These days, the state stocks a few different strains of greenback cutthroat in the high elevation lakes and streams of the Arkansas, South Platte, and North Platte drainages, various Colorado River cutthroat on the west slope, and the only known strain of Rio Grande in the Rio Grande drainage. So using geography to say which type we caught is probably good enough.

I suppose none of this is relevant if you caught those trout outside of Colorado. Nice fish by the way. Couple of real beauties.
Wow, thank you so much for the incredibly detailed response! I knew there was some confusion about identifying Greenbacks, but didn’t realize it went to that extent. Those are some great tips to help identify cutthroats in CO and I’ll definitely be using them in the future.

Were those electrofishing crews you worked for through CPW? That sounds like it would be an amazing job!

Thanks again, those are probably my favorite fish I caught in 2020 just because I’d never seen anything like them. They were both caught at a high alpine lake outside of Leadville so I assume it must be part of the Arkansas drainage basin.
 

justahack

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Were those electrofishing crews you worked for through CPW? That sounds like it would be an amazing job!
Yes the work was for CPW, BLM, and CSU at different times.

They were both caught at a high alpine lake outside of Leadville so I assume it must be part of the Arkansas drainage basin.
The lakes in the Sawatch Range are all pretty fantastic. If you were on the eastern flanks of that range, then yeah, it's the Ark. A few of my favorite lakes in Colorado are high in the Sawatch near Leadville. You live in a great place.
 
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