Dry Flies August Northeast

Cookster

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I will definitely check the regs. I know that the Margaree is a big river for a 4wt. guy like me but I had heard that some of the feeder streams were good for trout. That's what I am searching out. I'd still get to enjoy the Margaree area. We are blessed around here. And thanks again for the input.
 

mnigro

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Way late to this thread but I assume Cookster is under winter conditions so some reading advice is probably acceptable.

Not being familiar with your area the first piece of advice I can offer is to start with a Google search for a hatch chart on one of the larger rivers in your area, “hatch chart + river name”. That will at least give you an idea of the types of bugs in your general vicinity.

Once you understand the basic hatches in your area you can start reading up on each family of insects to learn their emergence / egg laying habits. Looking at mayflies as an example, hendricksons hatch mid afternoon while tricos are a morning hatch, most drakes start just before dark and go well into the night. If it’s drake season and you’re on the water at 1pm you won’t see anything hatching but you’d be good fishing large nymphs and ending your drift with a rise/dangle.

Hope this helps!
 

dennyk

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In August I'm fishing terrestrial patterns for surface trout fishing more then anything. As well as hoppers, ants, crickets don't overlook a few different sizes of parachute Adams as we as the October Caddis.

I'm going by Michigan streams that I fish. In the early morning give some streamers a try that replicate the minnows of your area. Sculpin patterns are pretty popular.

Denny
 
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