first fish on the swing with the two hander

flafly14

Well-known member
Messages
330
Reaction score
121
Location
FL
I bought a two hander awhile back and I've been trying to learn how to cast it. I started off flailing around with it and having absolutely zero success. Nothing felt good. Nothing really worked. So I made a tactical retreat and bought an OPST head and some tips for my 9' #5 to see if that might work a little better. I immediately had success from the first day. I got the feel for the double spey cast. It was so easy! I was really slinging it out there! And I was catching fish!

So the other day I used what I learned with the single hand spey casting and applied it to my two hander. And now I was actually sending some line out there with it! I really had learned a lot from doing that single hand spey casting. Not sure if learning this way works for others, but it sure helped me. So now the two hander started to be fun! Some casts good, some casts terrible, and a few awesome one that would go out nice and far and lay down straight. And behold...I actual caught a fish! A cuttie maybe 14 or 15". Totally fun.

So now my next mission is to work on my next cast other than the double spey. Maybe a snapT. I don't know.
 

fatbillybob

Well-known member
Messages
737
Reaction score
476
Yes snap t and you can do about everything with those 2. I’m a newbie too and landed my 1st two fall run steelhead. It’s pretty exciting. I also went opst on one of my 5wt singlehanders. I had/have similar sounding problems with 2 hand. For me it was getting the right amount of anchor. That means consistent end of strip, consistent line length in water, consistent stroke, consistent anchor makes for right cast setup. Then I could still screw that up with bad lower hand too much upper or poor rod position like dipping the rod tip back too far opening the d loop. Speycasts are easy yet hard like a golf swing. When you get the swing right the ball flys effortlessly. Then the next swing your ball is in the woods.
 

huronfly

Well-known member
Messages
922
Reaction score
251
Location
Ontario, Canada
Congrats! Snap T and double speys can get you pretty far so definitely learn the snap T. If the wind is blowing directly across the river into your face, it is really handy to learn the downstream and upstream perry poke as well. Don't overlook the single spey as well as it is the fastest way to get your fly back in the water, but timing your splash and go can be a bit trickier... And if you want to impress some cute ladies by the river a snake roll is also a must.
 

flav

Well-known member
Messages
1,270
Reaction score
562
Location
oregon
Congrats on that first fish on the two hander, although it could send you down the rabbit hole.

The double Spey is a cast for when the wind is blowing downstream. Next you need a cast for when the wind is blowing upstream , so you're covered in either situation, and the snap-T is a good one. You might also try the Perry poke, I prefer it over the snap-T, finding it more powerful and it doesn't twist your line like the snap does.

I'd only try the single spey or snake roll if you're using a longer head. Those are touch and go casts, and they're not easily performed with a Skagit type line.
 

flafly14

Well-known member
Messages
330
Reaction score
121
Location
FL
Well, I had an upstream wind today, so it was the perfect chance to try out the snapT. SnapT is officially much more difficult that doublespey. At least for me. Too aggressive on the anchor placement and your line lands way too far upstream. Not aggressive enough and it lands on your rod. It's just gonna take some time.

And while learning, I got fish #2 with the two hander! woohoo!
 

huronfly

Well-known member
Messages
922
Reaction score
251
Location
Ontario, Canada
Nice going, Keep at it, many people including myself find the Snap T a much easier cast to nail than a double spey. Once you have a consistent anchor I'm betting you'll come to find the snap t very easy.
 

Unknownflyman

Well-known member
Messages
3,819
Reaction score
1,677
Location
L'Étoile du Nord
Congratulations! I really like the OPST heads, I think they are great small river tools and they do help with casting. Once you get short heads down, long rods, long lines and different styles I think are easier to adjust to its just variations on a theme.

It is for me harder to dial in longer lines and heavier rigs but once its right they fly far and true all the same, I generally don't like heavy rigs and lines anyway I always look for the lightest fly, sink and line I can get away with for my casting style.

I am grateful that unless the rivers are really high, there's really no reason to use really heavy bulky flies, small tube flies and classics work just fine.
 

dillon

Well-known member
Messages
2,333
Reaction score
779
Location
Portland and Maupin, Oregon
Wind aside, I cast over my left shoulder when fishing on river right with a single Spey. When on river left it’s over my right shoulder, with you guessed, it a single Spey. Sometimes I switch it up and If the wind is blowing then I go to plan b.
 
Top