Fishing Vehicle

gpwhitejr

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Well, in the fall I got rid of my ancient minivan, fulling intending to buy another one in the spring. Then, winter struck. I have a nasty driveway and a broken snowblower (my task for my day off today is to try to fix the damn thing), and we just had a significant snowfall with more on the way; I said to my wife, "The next vehicle I buy will be one I can put a plow on." So I am looking at pickups, probably the F-150 or Tundra; in either case I need the crew cab with real back seats, so I am limited to the 6.5 foot box (and most of the ones I see for sale around here have the 5.5). I realize I will have to sacrifice total cargo volume, and I think I am OK with that, but how do you all deal with long items? For example, I have some one-piece surfcasting rods that are 7 and 8 feet long. In the van it was no problem transporting those (in fact, in the van it was no problem carrying a bundle of 10 foot 2x4s). I suppose I will have to obtain or make some kind of box to put on a roof rack; is that the standard procedure? Any advice from truck guys would be appreciated.

The other thought I had is to get a van and an ATV with a plow, but that gets too expensive and complicated. Another issue is that I go to work very early in the morning, and my neighborhood seems to be the last one the town plows reach. I would like knowing that I will be able to get out regardless of conditions (within reason).

By the way, maybe a little off topic, but I am faced with this choice: I can buy a reasonably good used one (around 2016 or thereabouts) or lease a shiny new toy. Several friends of mine lease their cars and swear by it, but I don't know what a good idea that is for a truck that is probably going to get banged around a bit (especially if you want to mount stuff on it that might even involve drilling holes). Anyone lease their fishing vehicle?
 

dennyk

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By the way, maybe a little off topic, but I am faced with this choice: I can buy a reasonably good used one (around 2016 or thereabouts) or lease a shiny new toy. Several friends of mine lease their cars and swear by it, but I don't know what a good idea that is for a truck that is probably going to get banged around a bit (especially if you want to mount stuff on it that might even involve drilling holes). Anyone lease their fishing vehicle?
If you will be drilling holes or actually using as a truck I'd consider used first. However, I was looking into leasing and Chevy they had a damage insurance policy that could be added to your payment if leasing is your choice, if you are not planning on buying it out of the lease.

Chevrolet XS Wear Lease Protection | Chevrolet Protection

I've changed my mind as far as getting a new ride at this time. I'm getting ready to take my '99 Silverado Z71 in for annual bumper to bumper maintenance and put the 5th set of tires on it. Just turned 315,000 miles. If I could find another '99 with low miles just like mine I'd buy it.

Denny
 

strmanglr scott

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Well, in the fall I got rid of my ancient minivan, fulling intending to buy another one in the spring. Then, winter struck. I have a nasty driveway and a broken snowblower (my task for my day off today is to try to fix the damn thing), and we just had a significant snowfall with more on the way; I said to my wife, "The next vehicle I buy will be one I can put a plow on." So I am looking at pickups, probably the F-150 or Tundra; in either case I need the crew cab with real back seats, so I am limited to the 6.5 foot box (and most of the ones I see for sale around here have the 5.5). I realize I will have to sacrifice total cargo volume, and I think I am OK with that, but how do you all deal with long items? For example, I have some one-piece surfcasting rods that are 7 and 8 feet long. In the van it was no problem transporting those (in fact, in the van it was no problem carrying a bundle of 10 foot 2x4s). I suppose I will have to obtain or make some kind of box to put on a roof rack; is that the standard procedure? Any advice from truck guys would be appreciated.

The other thought I had is to get a van and an ATV with a plow, but that gets too expensive and complicated. Another issue is that I go to work very early in the morning, and my neighborhood seems to be the last one the town plows reach. I would like knowing that I will be able to get out regardless of conditions (within reason).

By the way, maybe a little off topic, but I am faced with this choice: I can buy a reasonably good used one (around 2016 or thereabouts) or lease a shiny new toy. Several friends of mine lease their cars and swear by it, but I don't know what a good idea that is for a truck that is probably going to get banged around a bit (especially if you want to mount stuff on it that might even involve drilling holes). Anyone lease their fishing vehicle?
There are rod tubes out there that go on roof racks and lock up. I have never shopped them and not sure about 10 footers.

I could never lease, I drive way too many miles. Aside from that, brush scratches and the like, I prefer to own. I drive a lot and I keep my vehicles a long time. Got over 190,000 on my Jeep and still have no plans to replace. A well maintained vehicle will drive a lot of miles.

Personally I'd go with a Toyota.
 

jeep.ster

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I also looked at the lease option. Less monthly payment but I think too much abuse and arizona pinstriping. Too many miles per trip to lease. On the other hand my truck actualy looks very nice after all these years. I'm going to have to get a newer truck with less miles or keep my F150 for a fishing vehicle. At 192k my tranny is starting to slip and has to be rebuilt. Have to decide soon. No major component has ever failed on this truck so it has the oem water pump, power steering pump, etc. Other than that and good ball joints this old truck has everything I need. It's also a heritage model, the old body style badged an '04 the new body style and the last of its kind.

 

gpwhitejr

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Yeah, I have had a number of Toyotas and really like them. But I am actually leaning toward the Ford for several reasons. It seems that the Ford is less expensive for a similar truck, and gets better mileage. But mostly I am intrigued by the aluminum. You see, the main reason I had to get rid of my van is because of rust. It wouldn't pass inspection, and would have have cost too much to fix it adequately (Vermont has draconian inspection requirements, please don't get me started on that rant). So a vehicle that won't develop body rust is attractive.
 

csangler

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I have a 2013 Chevy Tahoe. It has been very reliable and other than changing tires, batteries and doing routine maintenance I have not had to put much money into it.

I would really like to buy that new Land Rover Defender that just came out. You can equip it with a built in air compressor, it has a portable rinse system and rubberized mats in the cargo area you can hose out. Would be great to rinse off my wading boots and waders and then put those in the lockable outside compartment that drains. It would be long enough to put in some rod holders in the inside so I can travel with rigged rods and the 4 wheel drive and wading capability would be fun but I have concerns about the maintenance and cost of ownership so I will wait and see how this new model fares during its first year. They have an off road version of the Yukon and Tahoe I was looking at as well.
 

Ard

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Well, in the fall I got rid of my ancient minivan, fulling intending to buy another one in the spring. Then, winter struck. I have a nasty driveway and a broken snowblower (my task for my day off today is to try to fix the damn thing), and we just had a significant snowfall with more on the way; I said to my wife, "The next vehicle I buy will be one I can put a plow on.

The other thought I had is to get a van and an ATV with a plow, but that gets too expensive and complicated.
I cherry picked your post leaving the lines above to reinforce what I am going to say. We have a fairly long drive here with what resembles a cul de sac or turn around that I put in when I graded the drive. The large circular area is for turning my truck with various trailers hitched to it with no backing up, you just drive around the circle and you are ready to leave next trip.

What caught my eye was 'snow plow' and ATV with plow.

Like you sometimes we get a lot of snow and sometimes we are left untouched while surrounding areas get 3 foot of it. I kept this cleared using a Suzuki King Quad with a standard 4 foot plow for years. It will do the job and finding a used 4 wheeler that hasn't been beat by kids is possible. Markets vary state to state but safe to say that if you shop smart $3000 can produce a good machine. Stick to the 500cc and over because you need the weight if you're gonna plow with it.

I have a Silverado and when pricing plow units I found that you can buy a 4 wheeler for much less that a plow for a truck. It's not just the plow, you generally have to beef up the front suspension to accommodate the weight of the unit and all the accessory needed to make a plow work. Cheep seems to be 5 - 6 thousand unless you find a used unit but the suspension still needs to be addressed.

I hauled that 4 wheeler to the cabin years ago for use there and since then have had people plow for us. Currently I have a reliable outfit that cleans the place up per my specifications for $45.00 a push. If we need them 10 times a year that's $450.00 annually and in ten years I still may not have spent what a good plow unit would cost me.

If you have a large enough property that a 4 wheeler could be utilized for other tasks that may be a good option. I used ours for skidding logs here and that is the primary use at the cabin also. I can tell you that clearing a foot of powder using a 4 wheeler takes a while. The blade can only handle so much before the overflow is not helping with the project. You need a good strategy when using one of them but it can be done. The plow guy gets me done in roughly 10 minutes and I find that a good thing.

Perhaps get that snow blower fixed if it's been getting the job done for you in the past and buy whatever vehicle will best serve overall needs but remember, plows aren't cheep. The only way I could justify one would be to have contracts with neighbors for clearing them at at least 35 a push and even then I'd have to do a lot of plow work to pay for one. I'd rather have a small excavator than a snow plow :)
 

gpwhitejr

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I cherry picked your post leaving the lines above to reinforce what I am going to say. We have a fairly long drive here with what resembles a cul de sac or turn around that I put in when I graded the drive. The large circular area is for turning my truck with various trailers hitched to it with no backing up, you just drive around the circle and you are ready to leave next trip.

What caught my eye was 'snow plow' and ATV with plow.

Like you sometimes we get a lot of snow and sometimes we are left untouched while surrounding areas get 3 foot of it. I kept this cleared using a Suzuki King Quad with a standard 4 foot plow for years. It will do the job and finding a used 4 wheeler that hasn't been beat by kids is possible. Markets vary state to state but safe to say that if you shop smart $3000 can produce a good machine. Stick to the 500cc and over because you need the weight if you're gonna plow with it.

I have a Silverado and when pricing plow units I found that you can buy a 4 wheeler for much less that a plow for a truck. It's not just the plow, you generally have to beef up the front suspension to accommodate the weight of the unit and all the accessory needed to make a plow work. Cheep seems to be 5 - 6 thousand unless you find a used unit but the suspension still needs to be addressed.

I hauled that 4 wheeler to the cabin years ago for use there and since then have had people plow for us. Currently I have a reliable outfit that cleans the place up per my specifications for $45.00 a push. If we need them 10 times a year that's $450.00 annually and in ten years I still may not have spent what a good plow unit would cost me.

If you have a large enough property that a 4 wheeler could be utilized for other tasks that may be a good option. I used ours for skidding logs here and that is the primary use at the cabin also. I can tell you that clearing a foot of powder using a 4 wheeler takes a while. The blade can only handle so much before the overflow is not helping with the project. You need a good strategy when using one of them but it can be done. The plow guy gets me done in roughly 10 minutes and I find that a good thing.

Perhaps get that snow blower fixed if it's been getting the job done for you in the past and buy whatever vehicle will best serve overall needs but remember, plows aren't cheep. The only way I could justify one would be to have contracts with neighbors for clearing them at at least 35 a push and even then I'd have to do a lot of plow work to pay for one. I'd rather have a small excavator than a snow plow :)
I don't really have another use for an ATV, though it would be a fun toy and I could always find a use! Since I do need another vehicle by spring I am leaning toward a pickup. Whether I will really use it to plow I don't know, that may have been just acute pique due to my snowblower issues (I tried cleaning the carb and that didn't help, so I am going to let a professional look at it). On the other hand, I have looked at "homeowner" grade plows for around $1000 new, and some on craigslist for around $500. We'll see next winter.

Oh, I certainly could hire someone to do it but I am kind of a DIY guy, and I go to work so early some mornings I couldn't be sure it would be done in time.
 

gpwhitejr

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Did you do any fishing there ? Where in Vt are you. Im in the Mad River Valley
I did fish, though it wasn't really a "fishing trip." You see, my wife and I spent our honeymoon there 36.5 years ago, and hadn't been back since, so we finally decided to go this year. I just did a little bit of DIY beach fishing each day; I didn't hire a guide (and I didn't catch anything). Nevertheless, we had a great time and will probably go back next year, finances permitting. I would be happy to post a full report, but since fishing was a minor part of the vacation I didn't think people on the forum would be all that interested.

Oh, I live in Chittenden County.
 

Ard

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$1000 seems awfully low considering the hydraulics, lighting and blade but then I don't know what homeowner grade means. What I know from my own experience (used to manage properties) doing plowing and earth moving work is that the blade needs to be sufficiently heavy so that it will scrape the ground level and not ride over the snow. When I used the 4 wheeler here I had to place 2 large lead weights on the plow carriage so it would scrape the base layer off the drive. Just saying to beware of the see through plastic type plows because I can't see them going through tough conditions without problems.

Hijack Ended :)
 

CaptRedbeard

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The 2008 Honda Ridgeline 4x4 has served me well for 90K. Just breaking it in some say. The in-bed drainable trunk fits multiple rod/reel cases and everything else I need. It also keeps it secure and very available for when I see a place on the Truckee River East of Reno I haven't tried yet. During the winter I have to use the storage under the rear seat to keep a minimal amount of fishing gear as the in-bed trunk gets other items. I mostly bank fish, due to a slight balance issue, so I just use a pair of Wellingtons or hip waders to keep my feet dry. Both are easily carried in either place.
 

morrisericd

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I have a 2001 Landcruiser. Holds tons of gear and will never get you stuck. Gas milage isn't all that great though. Thinking about a tube rod rack for it although that may scream fly fisherman too loudly!
 

87North

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I have a 2001 Landcruiser. Holds tons of gear and will never get you stuck. Gas milage isn't all that great though. Thinking about a tube rod rack for it although that may scream fly fisherman too loudly!
I'm super jealous of this! When you occasionally see the older Landcruisers drive by, I get all giddy like a child haha.
 
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