Flies that make you go hummmm

wjl

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What makes the royal wulff and the renegade work so well?
Twice this past summer I have eaten crow for "are you kidding me" two cats later fish on with these flies.
What makes them work so well, they seem to not represent anything :icon_redf
 

planettrout

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Renegade...read:

Renegade Trout Fly Fly Tying Video

If you tie, try some of these...I have a whole box of them in #12 - #18 with different colored tags:

http://www.flytierspage.com/agbeatty/bh_renegade_wet.htm

The Royal is only one of a number of Wulff patterns, all of which have their applications. It is one of the best all around attractor dries ever designed. Fran Better's Ausable Wulff is one of my favorites.They float like corks...

Wulff Flies

Rowan Nyman's Royal Wulff Cripple, a variant, is an absolute killer:

Royal Wulff Cripple


PT/TB
 
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lil_ol_angler_me

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when I had the pleasure to fish beside Lee

he told me when there isn't a hatch happening and your don't want to fish a nymph

the Wulff patterns are as good a fly to get started with and move on from there
if the fish aren't co-operating
 

fq13

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What makes the royal wulff and the renegade work so well?
Twice this past summer I have eaten crow for "are you kidding me" two cats later fish on with these flies.
What makes them work so well, they seem to not represent anything :icon_redf
I have no clue. But I do know that when I was in college and fishing for brookies in plunge pools and pocket water while backpacking in West Va.. and the Blue Ridge, the royal wullf was the go to fly. It was like the blue ridge equivelent of a parachute adams out west. I think it is just because the fish only see the fly for a second in those waters that something shiny works.
 

huntschool

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I dont think I have any better answers but I can tell you they work

Back in the day I caught a ton of fish on Catskill waters, including the Delaware with those flys.

I have since used them on the Snake and the Yellowstone as well as the Current, 11 Point and White in MO and the White and Norfork in AR. I have had guides tell me I am nuts but they worked. Oh, yea.... I had a guy tie me some with a bunch of yellow and fished them in the low elevations of the GSMNP water (Littler River, etc) and they worked there also. I tried them because of the "Yellow Sally" fly the locals throw.

The other fly that seems to do the same is the Humpy and Royal Humpy. I think sometimes it just pisses the fish off like you can some times do with a Madam X.
 

Rip Tide

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I think that humpys and Royal Wulffs are passable as most any kinda surface bug especially beetles but other terrestrials and most any other fish bug as well

The dry fly that gets me is the bi-visible. The first time that I caught a trout on one, I couldn't believe that the fish was that stupid.
The thing is, in an old book that I have on making your own drawn silkworm gut leaders and fly tying, the author assumes that if you're fishing a dry fly, then it has to be a bi-visible
They were that common.
 

cab

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New York Strip? Filet Minon? T-Bone? Porterhouse? It's all steak, and each can be delicious.

Is it a Caddis? Mayfly? Whatever, it sure looks buggy.

The Royal Wulff, one of those flies that matches nothing, yet resembles everything. A favorite.

CAB

P.S. Can you tell I'm hungry as I write this? :p
 

dean_mt

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Gary LaFontaine's research and creative thinking about flies and attraction theorizes why the Royal Wulff is so successful. It's his Theory of Attraction, chapter 10 in The Dry Fly, New Angles. I found this blog post that sums it up: Gary LaFontaine Wisdom... - Headhunters Fly Shop

The Renegade, with it's peacock body fits into the theory also. But again, in the same book, LaFontaine talks about the impression that the front and rear hackle tips of this pattern put on the water. Viewed from below he swore it was a great duplication of the impression a mayfly makes on the water. He was very focused on the view from below the water's surface, which makes sense right, the fish's view of the fly.
 

Rip Tide

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IMO, LaFontaine's Theory of Attraction is one of the most insightful views on fly fishing ever written
It's been my experience that when fishing the salt, choosing what fly to use based on the color of the sky works surprisingly well.
 

markfrid

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Peacock herl is a common denominator in the Royal and the Renegade - I think it's one of those magic tying materials that fish often can't resist. How many other patterns can you think of that have stood the test of time that use peacock herl? Prince, Zug Bug, Coachman, Red (and Grey) Hackle, Griffith Gnat .. I'm sure you can come up with plenty of others. It just seems to have fish-appeal. I don't know if it's "why" the Royal and Renegade catch fish so well, but it sure doesn't hurt!

Hey, on the subject of flies that make you go "hmmmm" - I was reading a fishing report for the Big T in Colorado and they suggested a size 14 Amy's Ant. A size14. Hmmmmmm. Have you ever seen one of those? On Charlie Cravens web site he gives tying instructions. The materials list is 10 items long (including TWO pieces of foam) and the instructions list 26 steps! I would have a very very difficult time cramming all that stuff on a size 14. If I did it somehow, it would just look like a blob. Size 14 - hmmmmm.

Mark
 

j1973s

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I fish mostly in southern Wy and northern Colorado.usually small to smaller streams. When I can not see a Parachute Adams because of age or water, my go to flies are the Royal Wulff or Royal Humpy. This summer, I have caught multiple larger fish on these two patterns. Usually a 14 but could be a 16 or even a 12.
These also work very well in local lakes. A 16 usually the go to size. Once upon a time, Bud Lilly's fly shop would sell their seconds on this fly and I would buy several dozen. At that time my Royal Wulff ties were not pretty but still caught fish.
Though I do not use a dropper often, these flies float so well that you can use a small dropper nymph and still it will float all day. Only drawback is it seems these flies whirl twirl when cast and cause leader problems but one cannot have everything.
 

jonbo

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I've discovered that the Palsa Indicator makes a pretty good "attractor pattern". I've been threatening to put a hook in one for quite awhile now.
 

roadkill1948

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Peacock herl is a common denominator in the Royal and the Renegade - I think it's one of those magic tying materials that fish often can't resist. How many other patterns can you think of that have stood the test of time that use peacock herl? Prince, Zug Bug, Coachman, Red (and Grey) Hackle, Griffith Gnat .. I'm sure you can come up with plenty of others. It just seems to have fish-appeal. I don't know if it's "why" the Royal and Renegade catch fish so well, but it sure doesn't hurt!

Hey, on the subject of flies that make you go "hmmmm" - I was reading a fishing report for the Big T in Colorado and they suggested a size 14 Amy's Ant. A size14. Hmmmmmm. Have you ever seen one of those? On Charlie Cravens web site he gives tying instructions. The materials list is 10 items long (including TWO pieces of foam) and the instructions list 26 steps! I would have a very very difficult time cramming all that stuff on a size 14. If I did it somehow, it would just look like a blob. Size 14 - hmmmmm.

Mark
Hmmmm, somewhere in the dusty recesses of my brain box - I remember a theory and/or tests done on natural vs. synthetic materials. I believe that some of the synthetics that appear to be the same actually looked different when viewed with UV light. There's a whole bunch of questions raised with that one. Like, the fish are viewing the material through water - what does water do the light? The bottom line at my age is just use what works! Thanks.
 

diamond rush

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The Royal Wulff works because it does. It's the emergent product of hundreds of years of iterative fly-tying. My own personal belief is that anything you tie with a peacock herl body and grizzly hackles will fish well. The natural shimmer of peacock herl closely matches the shimmery nature of chitinous insects. And it floats high so the trout doesn't get a real good look at it. The royal wulff fishes best on fast moving mountain freestone streams where the trout only get a split second to decide if something is food or not.

The other big benefit is psychological. We know it works. We're not sure about a new fly unless we have personal experience with it. Also, the royal wulff is easy to see, floats high, and lands upright most of the time.
 
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