General purpose spey

joshgamble

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How does spey crossover into saltwater? I want to get into saltwater fly but spey casting just looks so neat. I am in CT so will be fishing mostly for stripers, but would like to go up state NY in the season for steelhead etc. What properties should a decent rid have in terms of where it flexes and how much?
 

MoscaPescador

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Saltwater Spey casting is something that I don't do, but I know a few guys who chase Striped Bass off the California coast. They use 8 or 9 weight rods with heavy shooting heads (550 grains or more). They cast overhand style. If I recall correctly, the preferred rods have a tip flex.

As for costs, Spey rods can start under $400.

MP
 

Ard

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Overhand happens a lot when surf fishing. I have taken a 13' 8wt to Resurrection Bay and fished the surf three times. With the right coastal drift you can actually swing flies and catch fish. (I hate stripping a bunch before a recast) The best method for getting the fly out there is the two hand overhand cast. Like MP said an 8 or 9 weight should be fine 13 or 14 feet will be a good choice.
 

MoscaPescador

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So it is a viable option. Any reason it would me more inpractical than single handed.
Can't think of any reason not to use it for surf fishing.

For freshwater fishing, a Spey rod is not the right tool for fishing in close. It is possible to flick a few casts in close, but the splash of the heavy line will spook fish.

MP
 

joshgamble

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I kinda figured spey fishing was intended for big rivers where you need to make big casts to get to fish?
 

Ard

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Not necessarily Josh,

I have already caught more fish than I can quote a number for and none were farther than 60 feet away. I have been fishing streamers and wet flies for a long time and the longer rod proved to be the perfect tool for easier and better presentation and control of the flies. I have already written a great deal about what I think is a misconception about two hand rod fishing and have adopted the use of the big rod into a most effective method for catching fish. I plan (when the time comes) to use these rods for fishing in the lower 48 at such time that we move there. I could rattle off the names of many rivers and streams where the rod will be very effective. Just like a single hand rod casting with a two hander is not all about how far you can cast but more about what the result of your casting is.

Ard
 

Ard

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This is a problem with fly fishing gear and especially with Spey casting. Do not get confused by too much jargon, find someone who can help you and don't stress over these things.
 

randyflycaster

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Rio has an Outbound line designed for overhead spey casting. I would think you could also use a traditional fly line, or a scandi line.

It's very difficult to set up an anchor on a windy surf.

Randy
 

BigCliff

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Any reason it would me more inpractical than single handed?

...

I kinda figured spey fishing was intended for big rivers where you need to make big casts to get to fish?
Landing a fish by yourself with a longer rod is generally trickier. Given the increase in difficulty when going from landing a fish on a 8' rod to landing one on a 10' rod, think about what happens when the rod is 14' long. And then what if its a 15lb striper?

Spey casting was originally developed not so much for big rivers, as for situations where you need to make fairly long casts, but have tall stuff on the banks that interfere with your back cast. Spey techniques are used now both to get around this problem, but also to cover water efficiently. If you're needing to cover a stretch of water that's 70' across, and the fly needs to be 3' deep, you're best off with a spey rod and a skagit rig. You could do it with a single handed rod, but you'd have to be REALLY good at mending, and you'd be doing a lot of work casting all day.
 

Rifleman1776

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General purpose spey - What???

As a total beginner, I came to this forum to learn basics.
Unfortunately, much of what is posted uses terminology meaningful only to an experienced fly fisherman. I know this is a common failing on many topical forums. That does not mean it should continue.
This thread is useless and meaningless to me.
I do not know what "spey' means.
Nor do I now what "switch fishing" is.
Yes, I do try to look up meanings but oftentimes slang terms are not to be found.
I just ask that when introducing a subject you tell us what you are talking about.
 

MoscaPescador

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Re: General purpose spey - What???

Rifleman,
Spey fishing is a method to fish using longer two handed rods (12' and up) to make directional changes using roll casts. Traditionally the Atlantic Salmon was the species targeted by fly fisheres on the River Spey, Scotland, using this technique. Steelhead and other species have become common fish to catch using Spey techniques.

Over the years, cast styles have evolved. There are overhead casts as well as underhand casts (roll casts). Newer styles of underhanded casting have evolved: Skagit and Scandinavian. Within these styles, new casts were discovered: Snap-T, Snake Roll, Wombat... Also many Spey type casts are now being applied to single handed rods.

Switch is fishing using a shortened Spey rod using either Spey techniques or single handed rod techniques. These rods range from 10'6 to 11'9 (11' being the average). Switch rods make great long nymphing rods. Having the extra length makes for some great line control for long drifts. It also makes a great surf rod to help make casts clear the waves.

Here is a video of a young lady making a Snap-T cast. It shows the change in direction and the underhand (roll) cast.

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swr8ZB1Sps0"]YouTube- Snap T Spey Cast[/ame]

MP
 
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Rip Tide

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How does spey crossover into saltwater? I want to get into saltwater fly but spey casting just looks so neat. I am in CT so will be fishing mostly for stripers,
More guys each year fish spey rods in the Cape Cod Canal for stripers. The reason being those high rip rap banks make for difficult backcasts. I could think of a few other local areas that would benefit from spey casting too. The Thames from Norwich to New London would be one for the same reason.

Single handed rods from 10 to 10.5 feet are useful in the heavy surf for mending over breakers but the extra length really isn't need for distance as the fish are most often close to shore in the second or third wave
 
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joshgamble

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Re: General purpose spey - What???

As a total beginner, I came to this forum to learn basics.
Unfortunately, much of what is posted uses terminology meaningful only to an experienced fly fisherman. I know this is a common failing on many topical forums. That does not mean it should continue.
This thread is useless and meaningless to me.
I do not know what "spey' means.
Nor do I now what "switch fishing" is.
Yes, I do try to look up meanings but oftentimes slang terms are not to be found.
I just ask that when introducing a subject you tell us what you are talking about.
I have only been flyfishing for about 6mnths now and even I know what spey fishing is. There is a great resource for info out there,its called the internet. You should try it sometime.I really didnt like your tone.This is the spey section after all.:starwars:
 

fredaevans

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Can't think of any reason not to use it for surf fishing.

For freshwater fishing, a Spey rod is not the right tool for fishing in close. It is possible to flick a few casts in close, but the splash of the heavy line will spook fish.

MP
Too true. For 'fishing' I break rods into three general catigories: Single handers up to 10', 'switch rods that will typically be 11 to 12.5 foot long, and full on 2-handers there on up in length. Choose the tool that proper for the task.

As an example, if your casts are (generally) going to be under 40' to properly fish the water, here a full on 2-hander is total over-kill (as might a 'switch'). You'll spook more fish than you'll ever hook. There the 1 hander still 'rules the waves.'

At 30 to 50/60 feet the 'switch rod' shines as this is its element. 50' out ... now we're in 2-hander country.:thmbup:

fae

edit: A minor thought here (" ....Atlantic Salmon was the species targeted by fly fisheres on the River Spey, Scotland"). Spey rods/casting actually started out in Wales, not Scotland. That said, as long rods became more the norm, the word 'Spey' caught on and 'stuck.'
Fred
 
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