Glue for wading shoe soles

itchmesir

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I have an old pair of korkers wading shoes... How old? Like the original style of interchangeable soles... But the base of the sole is separating from my shoes... Being probably 5+ years old they're well broken in and by far the most comfortable wading shoes/boots I've owned and I have plenty of replacement soles for them... So I have no interest in replacing them... I want to fix them. What would be a good glue? I have some Loctite Marine Epoxy lying around... Would that work? What's a better option?
 

fq13

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Shoe Goo is a classic for a reason. It will run you around ten to fifteen bucks at Wally World. You just need a couple of vices and some patience as it takes awhile to set, but it works wonders on resoling everything from dock siders to hiking boots.
Or, if you are lucky enough to have a good shoe repair shop locally let them do it for you. It won't cost much more than the tube of glue you will never use again and they will do the job right.
PS Call Korkers. They might have a repair policy. You will probably pay for it and be bootless for a few weeks, but it will a factory approved guy doing the job.
Good luck.
 

Rip Tide

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Shoo Goo is just one of many varieties of GOOP!. and any one of them would work
You don't need vices either, duct tape works better, but first you need to shove as much newpaper into the boots as will fit and then shove in some more.
Cover the boot with more paper and wrap the tape on tight

Barge cement is the traditional glue that you'd get if buying replacement soles, but I'm not sure that it's any better than GOOP!
 

Ard

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Hi Itch,

Regardless of your choice of cement preparation is the key. What Rip has said about packing the boots prior to taping is right on advice. I used to do my own boots and used a wire brush to rough up both sides before applying the glue. Make them clean and be sure none of the original cement is on the boot side before you apply the new soles.
 

fq13

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Rip, I think I just got my man card pulled. What was I thinking? Using tools when duct tape will suffice? Hell, its like reading the instruction manual or asking for directions, a major infraction of the man code.:DROFL. Seriously, the stuffing the boots with newspaper is a great idea and one I will use in the future. But when the soles on my hiking boots got seperated I just took them to a local shoe shop and two days and twenty dollars later they were good as new. No need for DIY if a trained proffesional will do it at about the same cost as buying the materrials. Its kind of like tieing your own flies. I can tie a five dollar fly for thirty cents, but the first one cost me five hundred bucks.
 

JoJer

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I just replaced the felt (and studs) on my son's Lakestream wading shoes with this:
[ame="http://www.amazon.com/Caddis-Felt-Sole-Repair-Glue/dp/B003OAVRMI"]Amazon.com : Caddis Felt Sole Repair Kit with Glue : Fishing Wader Boots : Sports & [email protected]@[email protected]@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/[email protected]@[email protected]@418-z-hXGvL[/ame]
I got in Sportsman's warehouse.
These shoes:
Hodgman Lakestream Felt Sole Wading Boots Shoes Fly Fishing Mens Size 7 19204 | eBay

It says "one size fits all" but the replacement felt is a little too small for these size 13 shoes. I tried to follow the instructions pretty close, but ran out of the (black) glue that came with it about 3/4 through the job. I finished the job with Shoo Goo brand adhesive in the silver tube. So far, the Shoo Goo is holding together better than the glue that came with the kit. Good thing I stud these with 3/4" hex screws: It helps hold them together.
The soles under the felt on these shoes is some sort of very firm but flexible foam. I cleaned off the old glue and roughed the surface with a steel brush and drill. And I clamped the shoes with 4" C clamps for a couple of days after gluing. I used a piece of wood, cut to shape, on the felt to even the pressure of the clamp across the job.
I've worn the shoes several times and they seem to be holding up OK so far.
 

siege

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Think Trout is spot on. Barge Cement is what shoe and boot repair shops use every day. It works like contact cement in that you apply to both surfaces, allow to dry a few minutes, and press both both sides together. Your boots will be ready to use immediately. I build custom holsters and sheaths, and glue my seams before stitching and finishing. Great stuff. I glued some felt soles to an old pair of tennis shoes with Barge Cement, and wet waded with them for years.
 

fredaevans

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Barge cement.
TT's nailed it. Barge Cement is what the shoe maker's use to repair wading boots (and what ever else). Properly applied (READ-FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS!!) the stuff just works. And has for Lord knows how many decades.

Actually replacing felt bottoms is a pain in the butt. Two solutions: 'A' get a set of 'Korker's' with the replaceable bottoms. 'B,' if not Korker's, take your boots into a shoe repair shop and have 'Da Man' do the job. Yes-Yes I know you're handy .... here you will FAIL! :wiggle:

fae
 

silver creek

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Another vote for Barge Cement. It is what Weinbrenner Boot Company used to manufacture the Borger Wading Boot.

Barge® Glue Cement (DA081) - Household Glues/Cements - Ace Hardware

You need to grind the boot bottom to prep it. Fill the boot toe area with newspapers so it keeps its shape.

Coat the boot bottom and felt with barge cement and place on newspapers to allow it to partially dry per the instructions.

Then carefully and precisely line up the sole to the boot and apply but do not press hard to set the sole. You should be able move it just a bit for adjustment. Then use a rubber mallet to pound the sole to "set" the felt sole onto the boot bottom.

I then use strips cut from an old semi truck tire inner tube and warp it around the boot and sole to keep some pressure on.

These rubber inner tube strips are also great for keeping garbage bags from slipping off the edge of large trash cans. So go to a commercial tire shop and ask for the discarded semi truck tire inner tubes.
 

cmcdhuibh

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On another issue I have a pair a simms/keen boots with felt. Have any of you had these, and had them re-soled? The felt is inset into the boot with rubber around the outside I guess this was for better traction. Not sure if the kits will work with the thickness Thanks Chris
 

pheasanttail

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I agree with those who say Shoe Goo. My Uncle ( a fly fisherman of 20+ years) swears by it. He had the same pair of boots for 10 years and he just replaced the felt soles when they needed it. His attachment method was always Shoe Goo.


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Jackster

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I ordinarily use Shoe GOO but just re-glued felt soles on an old pair of Simms Guide boots. This time I went with Shoe GOO for Boots and Gloves. I almost opted for their E6000 adhesive (same company, Eclectic) but the Boots and Gloves was recommended by the Shoe GOO tech desk. It doesn't seem all that different than the standard Shoe GOO but then only time and use will tell.
Besides roughing up the mating surfaces clean them real good. I did the final cleaning with alcohol pads hoping to get any residue off. The duct tape technique works best for me also. You can put pressure on a lot of surface area while the adhesive kicks. It takes 24 to 72 hours for that stuff to set up properly. I err on the side of leaving the duct tape on for at least two full days.
Good luck with your project.
 

lorenzostyle

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For a year now ... due to problems with worn out soles, I decided to use shoes with interchangeable soles, like those of ACBC, the famous brand. Let's say that I'm very happy for now :)
 

VaFisherman

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I suggest throwing the boots away and purchasing a new pair. I have used Barge Cement, Shoe-Goo and one other I cannot think of and none lasted more than a few trips. Now maybe I am just a poor craftsman when it comes to using these products but life is too short and fishing time to valuable to keep having equipment failures.
 

flytie09

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I’d be curious after 5 years if the shoe re-gluing was attempted and worked or if they were retired. As much as it pains me to say..... I had 3x pairs of early model Korker boots blow apart on me. A shame as I loved how comfortable they were.
 
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