Goodwin-Granger- Champion. Reel?

FlyGuy1954

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I have a refurbished Goodwin- Granger “Champion” rod , and I was wondering what make and model reel I could put with it , that would be “era” specific to the rod. I’ve researched the rod and it appears to have been made between 1936 and 1941. So I’m looking for a single action 5/6 weight reel to complete the combo. Also should I use DT or weight forward line , when I finally take to the water .

FlyGuy1954Goodwin_ Granger Ocean City #77 01042020.jpg
 
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flytie09

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A Pflueger Medalist, Shakespeare Russel or Heddon Imperial 125 are all good US made period reels.

Can’t go wrong with a Hardy Perfect or St George either though. A period Hardy is going to be pricey though. The design for both was without change for the most part for almost 100 years.

I’m also partial to English reels in this period like Farlow, Allcock, J W Young, etc. You just have to make sure you verify the length of the reel foot (and US made reels in this era) can fit the rod’s reel seat.

As far as lines...... I would use a DT line if it was me. Cortland Peach or Sylk are close in feel to silk lines.
 

FlyGuy1954

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I have a refurbished Goodwin- Granger “Champion” rod , and I was wondering what make and model reel I could put with it , that would be “era” specific to the rod. I’ve researched the rod and it appears to have been made between 1936 and 1941. So I’m looking for a single action 5/6 weight reel to complete the combo. Also should I use DT or weight forward line , when I finally take to the water .

FlyGuy1954
Thanks flytie09.
I was thinking the Pflugger Medalist looked correct,and would probably work just fine. I’ve got a couple of Ocean City #77, and I like them a lot , but they are not the same era,and I believe they may be a bit heavy for the rod.Goodwin- Granger & Sears reel l.jpg
 
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joe_strummer

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A US-made Pflueger Medalist, a 1494 would be perfect iirc. I had one of those, a Goodwin Granger Champion 8'-6" -- 8642 in Granger size designations iirc, 8'-6" blank weighing 4.2 oz, no reel seat. I liked the SA Ultra lines on my rods when I fished a lot of bamboo.
 

Rip Tide

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I use a medalist on my 1938 South Bend #25 and it's barely heavy enough, even on a 7.5" rod
I'm sure your OC 77 would be fine

IMGP0010.jpg
 

flytie09

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The problem is most reels made in the US for that are period.....will seem light for that rod. The Pflueger, Shakespeare and Heddon are all die cast aluminum and I agree with Rip are very light. Very much unlike their English brothers. Heavy bamboo rods were simply what was available in the 1930s...so from a period perspective......those I suggest are accurate.

Some will argue you want the lightest reel possible, while others will argue you want to focus on where the balance point is on the cork, while others want a slightly tip heavy rod. Some like me....don't worry about it too much. 8 hours a couple times a year isn't going to kill me. I'd say....use what is comfortable to you.

If a reel is too light...there are ways around this. Some wrap leadcore under the backing to add extra weight to change the "balance" point on the cork. Play around until you get it where you're happy.

Good luck on your search either way. I could blabber on about reels for pages and pages...but will stop at these few I suggest. Some food for thought at the very least.
 

trev

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Any reel made before WW2 was intended for cane or wood rods, fiberglass as used for rods and antennas was a war time invention.
1496 (~7'5 oz) and DT line seem right to me, I think the smaller Pflueger reels won't hold a large modern DT. (1596 for left wind)
I had read some place that the Medalist were stamped aircraft grade aluminum. I recall the writer said that the Asian made versions were inferior in that they were cast rather than stamped. It surprises me that they were die cast.
 

Rip Tide

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In my photo of medalists above there's ;

a 1492,... DT4 line
two 1494s, ...one WF6, one DT6
a 1494 1/2.... 7wt
a 1495... also good for a 7wt
two 1495 1/2.... 8wt lines
a GEM **95.... 8wt line
a 1598....I think that's an 11wt

Imported medalists are not as "solid" as the US made but still very good
 

flytie09

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I had read some place that the Medalist were stamped aircraft grade aluminum. I recall the writer said that the Asian made versions were inferior in that they were cast rather than stamped. It surprises me that they were die cast.
I was mistaken trev. You are correct.

To clarify the made in Asia (Japan and eventually China) were considered lesser quality than the US made from Pflueger aficianados...but still workhorses. I've read some forum posts here and there from various members that claim the original Medalists were stamped from "aircraft grade aluminum" and later versions (post 1982) were die cast aluminum. Both of lesser quality and significantly less weight as compared to reels machined from bar stock aluminum as many of the UK reels were.

This from "An Angler's Guide to the Pflueger Medalist" - An Angler's Guide to the Pflueger Medalist, Part 2 of an in-depth exploration by Fly Fish Ohio!

As an aside, it's been surmised elsewhere that changes took place to the aluminum used in the back plate and spool after (some say during) this manufacturing series (1980s). There are at least eight variations in aluminum alloy used in manufacturing today, ranging from series 1xxx to 8xxx, with much ado about T6061 or T6062 "aircraft grade" aluminum being bandied about by various fly reel manufacturers. A quick Internet search will demonstrate that 2xxx and 7xxx are also used in various parts of aircraft construction, and that 2xxx is the most common alloy used in manufacturing. Shakespeare doesn't publish any particular claims about metal quality for the Medalist series. It's almost certain that as the world economy grew and placed new demands upon raw materials that the quality of aluminum alloy used in production of the Pflueger Medalist, and most other fishing reels, slowly descended the ladder of price. We'll revisit my subjective reaction to parts quality as we discuss later manufacturing versions.

I am partial to the 1938 - 1952 models with the round line guide myself. A classic American blue collar reel.
 

FlyGuy1954

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Thank you all for your input . I do think that a single action , reel Like a Pflueger Medalist , or a Bronson 360 Royal would both be age appropriate and functional . I have some time to get it straightened out , because it's still cold and winter hasn't even started yet here in Michigan
 

trev

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Thanks for that reference link flytie09, I often forget where I have read stuff and when.
I thought the U.S. Medalists were all pretty costly to be considered Blue collar, there were lots of cheaper reels even when I bought my first one in the mid '70s. But I guess that is a matter of perspective.
I happen to like the ones made from '59-'79 in both Akron and Fayetteville, simply for the left wind conversion, I have a couple made in China that function just fine but the back plates are noticeably heavier in the same model. But if I were a collector I'd be looking for the older models with sculpted pillars and also the even earlier click pawl versions.
 

flytie09

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If you really want to spice things up.....the red agate line guide reels made in the UK from the 30s can't be beat. They are found in a wide array of makes and prices.

WSHX1739.JPG
 

JokerTBQ

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Ok, but if we talk about best spinning reel, I would consider about Penn Battle II. Did you try it? It's way better than any other spinning reel, because it's light weight paired with superior durability of mechanism in equal measure. I've tried some other models, but they were not so great like this one.
 

flytie09

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I actually own the penn battle II reel and bought one for my Dad. But this is a fly fishing forum...... so we stick to those topics.
 

springcreek

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I own a similar Granger rod and use both Hardy St George and Uniqua reels on it. If you looking for period correct versions, you want a leaded finish and not one with enamel which came later. The Uniqua reels are going to be less expensive if that is a factor in you decision making.
 
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