Help identifying a mayfly

dcfoster

Well-known member
Messages
103
Reaction score
3
Location
Owen Sound, Ontario
Hi there, I have this mayfly land on my hand a couple of weeks ago here in southern Ontario. Could someone help identify what type of mayfly this is. The generic and/or Latin name?

When I compared it to the flies I had, it seemed like it could be a Dark Hendrickson?




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Gotribe

Well-known member
Messages
106
Reaction score
51
Location
Ohio
Looks like Isonychia of some sort, yes Hendrickson. There’s a great app called iNaturalist. You open it up, take a photo of what you want to ID and it tells you what it is - plants, animals, insects. If you save it, it will save location and time, adding it to your list and also so others can search and see it.
 

flytie09

Well-known member
Messages
3,292
Reaction score
562
Location
VA
I’d guess a Dark Hendrickson if I had a gun to my head.
 

Rip Tide

Well-known member
Messages
9,929
Reaction score
250
Location
quiet corner, ct
Isonychia
or for those of us that don't speak Latin.... the slate drake

 

dcfoster

Well-known member
Messages
103
Reaction score
3
Location
Owen Sound, Ontario
Thanks everyone for all your help. As substitutes, would a dark Hendrickson or an Adams be good options?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Ard

Administrator
Messages
19,867
Reaction score
1,276
Location
Wasilla / Skwentna, Alaska
If you are good at tying take a look in the video gallery for a recent post from me. I tried to demo a technique for making slate mallard wings and did so on a size 14 hook. The resulting fly if tied on a 14 or 16 will suffice for what you are showing us. Tie them down to an 18 and they catch during almost any hatch condition even sulfur hatches. BTW, the video gallery is a sub forum of General Discussion, I don't know if people know it's here or not.
 

dcfoster

Well-known member
Messages
103
Reaction score
3
Location
Owen Sound, Ontario
If you are good at tying take a look in the video gallery for a recent post from me. I tried to demo a technique for making slate mallard wings and did so on a size 14 hook. The resulting fly if tied on a 14 or 16 will suffice for what you are showing us. Tie them down to an 18 and they catch during almost any hatch condition even sulfur hatches. BTW, the video gallery is a sub forum of General Discussion, I don't know if people know it's here or not.
Thanks so much Ard. Although I do Thai I don’t have a lot of materials needed for a dry fly patterns. However when I went online to look at different sites for the two names given above all of them seem to have multicolored floor access and almost none of them were completely grey. Do you know what else I could look for that would match this gray color? Or is this only a specific stage of say a juvenile may fly? Also the reelflies.ca website doesn’t list anything for slate drakes... do you know why that would be? Are they not very common?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

dcfoster

Well-known member
Messages
103
Reaction score
3
Location
Owen Sound, Ontario
Another problem I've come across is that it seems this this flies has many different names (Mahogany Dun, some call it the Dun Variant, or Slate Drake) yet not the patterns I've come across are grey (like the original picture I posted). Why is it so difficult to find a grey coloured slate drake? Can I simply use the same tying instructions and use grey dubbing instead?
 

Rip Tide

Well-known member
Messages
9,929
Reaction score
250
Location
quiet corner, ct
Just so you know
That's a traditional winged wet fly. Not a dry fly
If you want to tie dry flies, substitute how ever you like
Just get the size right.
 

redietz

Well-known member
Messages
436
Reaction score
92
Location
Central Maryland
Just so you know
That's a traditional winged wet fly. Not a dry fly
If you want to tie dry flies, substitute how ever you like
Just get the size right.
Or use a dry Leadwing Coachman.

One of the best pieces of advice I got about fly fishing back in the 70's was about the iso hatch: "Near dark, they turn into Royal Coachmen".

During the day, however, I stick with a Leadwing Coachman wet. In many rivers, iso nymphs crawl out of the water to emerge like stone flies. There's not a lot of dry action until the spinner fall.
 
Top