Help identifying a strange bug

dcfoster

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I turned over Stone the other day on a small Spring Creek and found quite a few of these under the rocks here in southern Ontario. When I think back to the matching the hatch books I’ve read I don’t remember ever seeing a nymph or pupa that looks like this. When I watched closely though it’s sort of moved like a shrimp or crustacean… Could this be something in the shrimp and or Scud family?




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Bent Undergrowth

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I turned over Stone the other day on a small Spring Creek and found quite a few of these under the rocks here in southern Ontario. When I think back to the matching the hatch books I’ve read I don’t remember ever seeing a nymph or pupa that looks like this. When I watched closely though it’s sort of moved like a shrimp or crustacean… Could this be something in the shrimp and or Scud family?




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Appears to be a mayfly nymph of the swimming variety.

Possibly isonynchia bicolor.

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dcfoster

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Thanks everyone for your replies. I had also posted another picture of a mayfly that people said was an Isonychia (or the slate Drake)… Would this be the nymphal form then?

Here’s a picture of the dun I posted:




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Ard

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Thanks everyone for your replies. I had also posted another picture of a mayfly that people said was an Isonychia (or the slate Drake)… Would this be the nymphal form then?

Here’s a picture of the dun I posted:




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HI,

How large would you say that mayfly was? Could it possibly have been as small as a #18 imitation? I ask this because it looks very much like what I called Little Blue Quill. It's hard for me to discern the color of the abdomen on my screen it appears to be very dark gray or possibly rusty gray, can't tell. If they are quite small I just posted a video in the Video Gallery of how to tie something very similar.
 

dcfoster

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HI,

How large would you say that mayfly was? Could it possibly have been as small as a #18 imitation? I ask this because it looks very much like what I called Little Blue Quill. It's hard for me to discern the color of the abdomen on my screen it appears to be very dark gray or possibly rusty gray, can't tell. If they are quite small I just posted a video in the Video Gallery of how to tie something very similar.
I’m not very good at this but I think maybe a size 14? I don’t think it’s as small as an 18… I have attached a picture of the mayfly near my thumb nail so you can get a better idea. Also, everything is grey- the thorax, tail, eyes and wings.




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Bent Undergrowth

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Truth is most of our common names can refer to multiple species (some of which may look quite different depending on who you ask, and in what region).

I think you got some good answers on this dun in your other thread.

Personally, I mainly just try to get the size and shade right when tying, and don't often concern myself much with the exact species. I'm colorblind, so it would be pretty futile anyway... what I can tell you is I catch a lot of fish. So if you're thinking you need to have the perfect pattern for every species, don't sweat it. You'd go nuts trying. I'd postulate that <5% of fish bother to look beyond the basic profile of your fly - presentation (e.g. drag, placement) and size are much more important than exact color and detail. In fact, there can be significant differences in these attributes even within the same species.

If you are really into the entomology, I'd suggest finding some literature and maybe a few hatch charts specific to your region. Also, check out troutnut, a great repository of information and photos on aquatic insects.

Cheers.
 

dcfoster

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Truth is most of our common names can refer to multiple species (some of which may look quite different depending on who you ask, and in what region).

I think you got some good answers on this dun in your other thread.

Personally, I mainly just try to get the size and shade right when tying, and don't often concern myself much with the exact species. I'm colorblind, so it would be pretty futile anyway... what I can tell you is I catch a lot of fish. So if you're thinking you need to have the perfect pattern for every species, don't sweat it. You'd go nuts trying
Thanks for the encouragement! It’s a good reminder!


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dcfoster

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I was just thinking about what you said about trying to get the size and shape correct… So if I had some dark Hendrickson’s and Adams that matched the size and shape of that may fly with those be good options?


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Bent Undergrowth

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I wouldn't hesitate to fish those patterns to this hatch. Don't be afraid to trim a little hackle, or fish emergers either if you have them. Sometimes (often) getting a bit lower in the surface film makes all the difference.

Fish will key in on the most vulnerable stage in the insect life cycle. Emergers allow them to grab food with less energy.

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philly

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Definitely an isonychia nymph. It has that white stripe down the middle of it's back. The mayfly is probably a Slate Drake. The Slate Drake is a larger mayfly usually tied on size 12 2 XL hook. Also another name for the Slate Drake is the White Glove Howdy. The second and third pair of legs are usually a lighter color or white. It looks like the back legs on the mayfly in the picture are lighter than the front pair.
 
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