Help identifying a wet fly pattern

dcfoster

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Hi there I was given this flyer last year by a gentleman from Scotland… We were on a river fishing for fall steelhead. Could anyone let me what material the hackle might be? It’s olive... Also if anyone knows the name of the fly and the type of hook used that would be really helpful. I have a bunch of Golden pheasant tippets that I would like to use to toe up a bunch.




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flytie09

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I would guess he was a left handed fly tier. The hackle fibers are rather stiff and looks like an olive rooster saddle hackle. Hook looks likes a caddis/egg/scud hook. I would assume a 2X heavy version.
 

Caliborn

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It might be an olive version of a black pennell. which is a Scottish fly according to mike dawes in his book "the flytier's manual.
 

trev

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I would guess he was a left handed fly tier.
why?

I would be guessing at the name but you can get close to duplicating it with GP tippet tail, black thread or floss body, silver rib, and olive saddle hackle as suggested above. I'd use a standard wet fly or all purpose hook. The suggested Black Pennell is remarkably similar to your fly.
 

flytie09

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The way the ribbing is wound is the reverse that of the way a right handed fly tyer would wind it. Good find on the name btw.... pretty close..... Olive Pennell. I might have to twist up a few myself. Right handed style though.
 
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Ard

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I'd call that a Sea Trout fly and doubt that aside from a regional name there will be much to know. Pretty simple and could be effective.
 

trev

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The way the ribbing is wound is the reverse that of the way a right handed fly tyer would wind it. Good find on the name btw.... pretty close..... Olive Pennell. I might have to twist up a few myself. Right handed style though.
I learned to always counter wind the ribbing and my right hand tied flies always are ribbed like that. I thought that was what you referred to.
But in my experience winding the ribbing in the same direction as the material/thread lets the rib sink into the body and provides less protection, it always looks wrong to me.

oh, the name was @Caliborn suggestion.
 
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flytie09

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Depends on several factors.....but in this case for the body material with it being floss (I think).......it's not necessary to counter wrap the ribbing. At least I don't and most fly patterns I see it's not done whether I'm using silk or synthetic floss.

Perhaps someone likes doing it this way and does it backwards. But for most leftys....that's how they do it so I'm making an educated guess based on the statistical odds someone follows standard convention. All my tying as a righty (unless I'm locking in a hackle or using herl fibers like peacock, ostrich or pheasant/turkey tail) then I wrap wire or tinsels in the same direction every time (clockwise as looking from hook eye to the bend)....I'm not counter wrapping.


Am I wrong?......perhaps because the second posting says to counter rib floss.

Google ribbing floss bodies on flies and tell me of the first 100 images you see...how many has the ribbing going counterclockwise?
 

bumble54

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The way the ribbing is wound is the reverse that of the way a right handed fly tyer would wind it. Good find on the name btw.... pretty close..... Olive Pennell. I might have to twist up a few myself. Right handed style though.
Actually that is the way I rib a fly and I'm right handed, I wind rib in the opposite direction to that which the body is wound, it makes more sense to me and results in a more secure body.

I would say the fly is an attempt at some version of a Pennel but with the wrong proportions and incorrect use of the materials used.
 

trev

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I don't guess there is a right or wrong, what ever source book I started with or some magazine article forty years ago convinced me that counter wrapping was a better way and I have had bodies come unwound when ribbed in the same direction.
Lots of good/famous tyers do rib in the same direction though and so it is acceptable. I don't think I ever bought a store fly that was counter wrapped.
Even a thread rib I counter wrap, habit perhaps.
 

flytie09

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I'm not saying there is a right or wrong manner in this process. I'm saying simply what is commonly seen. If you do things that are not conventional...and like to do it another way for whatever reason...then great. Even Charlie Craven winds his ribbing opposite as a natural right hander for another reason. He has the jaws facing the opposite direction and ties left handed. I'm not crazy enough to tell Charlie he's doing it all wrong.


"Do you remember your first vise and the first fly you tied?

The first vise I had came in that little kit and was a cheap little thumb screw version… I’m sure I still have it somewhere. A student in one of my classes had the same vise a couple years ago and gave it to me when he upgraded so I do have a brand new version of that same vise on display at the shop..incidentally, the thumb screw on that first vise is what influenced me to tie left handed. As I said, I had no instruction, so I just assumed that the thumb screw should be on my near side so I ended up being right handed and tying left handed which has was pretty fortuitous."


Looks like a ringer to me.......


 

redietz

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... a Scottish fly according to mike dawes in his book "the flytier's manual.
West country (i.e. the part of England near the Welsh border) I believe. At least Henry Cholmondeley-Pennel, it's inventor was from the West country. The fly is widely used throughout Great Britain.
 

FlyFisher23

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This is a tricky fly to identify, overall it looks pretty simple and is a decent quality. That may be a caddis pattern but it could also be a variation of a rio grande king
 
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