Help IDing these

LimerickShaw

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Hey all, trying to really start to identify bugs a bit more so I can be more familiar. Any help with identifying these would be great. I was in the white mountains of New Hampshire fwiw. Sorry they’re not the best quality! The one on the rock did appear to have some legs that you can really make out from the pic
 

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Rip Tide

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Green and in a (rocky) mountain stream.
Could they be Green Rock Worms (caddis larva) ?
I don't speak Latin, but when you see those, they are very important.
The adult is a stonefly
 
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LimerickShaw

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Green and in a (rocky) mountain stream.
Could they be Green Rock Worms (caddis larva) ?
I don't speak Latin, but when you see those, they are very important.
The adult is a stonefly
I thought the adult looked like a stone but wasn’t sure. I’ll keep looking for the green one, it was definitely one of the more interesting ones I’ve seen. What makes them particularly special, just simply being a caddis larva? Definitely in a rocky freestone mountain stream
 
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flav

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All those, except the last one, are stoneflies. The nymphs have two wing pads (stones have 2 pairs of wings as an adult), two short tails, flat head with eyes on the sides; probably yellow sallies or something similar.
 

Lamarsh

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1, 2 and 4 look like stonefly nymphs (see wing casings), and 3 looks like same stonefly but in adult phase (flat laying wings). 5 looks like caddis larva.
 

flytie09

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I use Troutnut. Very good insect ID website.


This coupled with an area hatch chart will get you the Latin name and zoomed in pics to compare. Make sure you pack a microscope next time. I’m sure there a kit with one somewhere for those that like to know 100%. I’m kidding….. but some get that geeky about the exact species.

For me, insect type, size, color, and shape are enough for me. Match best I can or tie some for next time. Repeat until I get it right.

I can say this……successful skilled anglers matching hatches…..aren’t guessing. Good luck to you.
 

trev

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I agree with Lamarsh, fwiw, but it's been a long time since I was studious about insects, having become a believer in approximation of shape and color. Four "green" stoneflies and a caddis worm, although most of the caddis I've seen were housed in a stone cocoon and smaller.
I always thought the "rock worm" title came from the rock houses they build?
 

flytie09

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Caddis are the most diverse insect on trout streams and the most misunderstood. I’m far from an expert. Books on them have been written …… most noteably, Gary LaFontaine and Thomas Ames.


Rock worms actually are Caddis that live freely during their juvenile stage and build a rock case cocoon to pupate.

“Telling Green Rock Worms from Net-spinning Caddis?

Given the similar size, shape, color, and even habitat used by net-spinning caddis and green rock worms, what is the best way to tell the two apart? For the larval and pupal stages the answer is simple - gills. Net-spinning caddis have them and most green rock worms don’t. Let’s look at the larvae first.”

Look for the gills…..I can’t tell in the fuzzy pic.
 
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TroutFodder2

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Lamarsh has the first 4 correct and flav gets credit for the last one. The first 4 photos are all stoneflies in the family Chloroperlidae. 1, 2, and 4 are nymphs and 3 is an adult. The last photo is a black fly larva in the family Simuliidae.
 
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