Help with recreating my lucky fly

Aspen11036

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First, can someone identify this fly for me. Guessing it would be considered a wooly bugger. Not even sure where I got it but I’ve caught a ton of trout on it. But this afternoon I snagged and lost it. Can someone break it down for me and also point me to someone who may be able to tie more for me?? Thanks in advance.
 

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moucheur2003

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The general design looks like a Woolly Bugger, but the colors are unusual. A Woolly Bugger tied like that would have a yellow or orange marabou (can't quite tell your original color or material because the fly is wet in the photo) tail, an orange chenille body (which I think is what your fly has, but it might be wool), and a white palmered saddle hackle. If that isn't an exact match it still ought to be close enough to the original to fool the fish. If that particular color combination has a particular name, though, I don't know it.
 

Aspen11036

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Yes the body had more of an orange to it and the tail was yellow. The tail also wasn’t as full as a normal bugger. I’m guessing it was just something tied up by a local near where I was steelhead fishing bc I know I didn’t tie it.
 

Ard

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I figure it's time you start tying flies..... and welcome to the forum.

If you could describe what material the tailing was made from it would be simple for someone to make some. From the photo I can't really tell if the tail was marabou or Arctic Fox hair, I would imagine either would give the same effect when wet.
 

flytie09

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My vote would be a wooly bugger. Not a traditional color scheme. Tough to say with the tail wet....but it's longer than a standard wooly worm. If you're saying steelhead........the wooly bugger would definitely be my choice.

Material list:

Hook - #2 - #6 streamer 2X Heavy and 2X Long
Weight - Medium lead free wire
Tail - Yellow or orange marabou (this version is pretty sparse)
Body - Standard orange ultra chenille
Hackle - White rooster saddle
Rib - Small silver or gold wire
Head - Black thread

Here's a good tutorial from one of the best - Wooly Bugger - Charlie's Fly Box

Someone to tie them for you?.....check out member on here, Jerry - Hairwing530. You won't be disappointed and is for a great cause.

Do You Buy Your Flies?
 

silver creek

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Post a photo of the fly when it is dry.

The hackle looks oversized, ie, longer than standard for a bugger of that length. So I'd like to see if that is real once the hackle is not wet and distorted.
 

Ard

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I should have said that in a PM, I did not mean to throw a gottcha your way buddy. By the time I thought about it I was cooking dinner..........

I have another thought about the fly though. He calls it a lucky fly, I honestly stopped believing in luck with regard to fishing a long time ago. I'd suggest that the color hue of the fly may be in part responsible for success and perhaps the technique with which it has been used. The unknown factor would be whether he was catching stocked trout or wild with the fly.

The stocked or wild thing may be a moot point because I have fished in places where the fish are as wild as they get and caught them on a Skykomish Sunrise. No way that should be looking like a decent meal in early June but they will grab it... I wouldn't worry over an exact replica just basic coloration and I'd be tempted to look at a bunny strip Zonker style in the same color.
 

silver creek

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About the suggested colors of the fly especially the body. I don't think orange would be the right color.

The reason is that we all know that when a fly gets wet, the colors look darker. Less light is reflected back to your eyes from wet objects. That is why you use a lighter color nymph when trying to match the color of a live nymph you gathered from the river.

So I think the body color when dry would be a light tan.

Why Do Things Get Darker When Wet? | Live Science



 

trev

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I don't think it's possible to recreate the lost fly without a dry, fluffy picture. We can only speculate that it might have looked this way or that, I can't tell from the wet picture what the tail is, it might be hair, marabou, synthetic, or strip- my guess is synthetic from the length and apparent limpness, but... ostrich, heron flue emu etc - as mentioned the colors are off due to being wet but the colors are also probably off due to individual machine rendering.
I perceived the tail and body as shades of tan and the hackle as cream, yet others said white hackle and the OP said
Yes the body had more of an orange to it and the tail was yellow.
What you can do, Aspen is examine some bugger variation patterns on various sites to see if one stands out as close to what you remember, then examine various materials to see if the colors look right and determine what you think the tail was- then mess around making similar flies to the proportions of your picture.
I'm guessing the sparse oversize hackle and the skinny overlong tail may be key factors if the colors run any where from white to tan to ginger to brown.
 

flytie09

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Perhaps it’s orange or tan or brown..... but it’s like trying to prove the famous Bigfoot photo is fake or not.

This one looks pretty close. Called the Chili Peper.

6957DFEC-FC1B-4D2C-AB2D-0704A0AE93CE.jpg

Good luck in your hunt for Bigfoot.
 
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