Hobie iTrek 11 -thoughts?

yikes

Well-known member
Messages
2,272
Reaction score
222
Location
So Cal
I know it's easy to criticize the high cost of Hobies, but I find the iTrek11 ticks a lot of boxes, and I don't know if there's a comparable competitor.

It's basically their pedal-powered fishing setup (seat rudder, pedals, mounting accessories) married to an inflatable SUP platform, starting at about $2,500.
The advantage is:
- no tow vehicle necessary, can roll up and fit in a car trunk
- can also be converted to a recreational SUP, if that's your thing
- appears to be less expensive than their Mirage kayaks

1611783553631.png

I used their original pedal drive almost 10 years ago, and it was great for a super-quiet early morning fishing session. The new-design fins flip back when encountering underwater obstacles.

Do you know if anyone else is in this kind of niche market product?
 

ed from bama

Well-known member
Messages
189
Reaction score
459
Location
south Alabama
Good morning to all-
Brother, I can't help you with this specific craft.
However, I will say that if this sort of fishing boat is made by Hobie, it is likely to be as good as can be made. Hobie doesn't offer cheap stuff, but they don't offer junk, either.
If it fits your needs- and wants- I'd say go for it.
Please let us know how it works out- I'm always interested in kayak fishing craft.

thanks- Ed
 

whalensdad

Well-known member
Messages
504
Reaction score
14
Location
Old Saybrook, CT
I know it's easy to criticize the high cost of Hobies, but I find the iTrek11 ticks a lot of boxes, and I don't know if there's a comparable competitor.

It's basically their pedal-powered fishing setup (seat rudder, pedals, mounting accessories) married to an inflatable SUP platform, starting at about $2,500.
The advantage is:
- no tow vehicle necessary, can roll up and fit in a car trunk
- can also be converted to a recreational SUP, if that's your thing
- appears to be less expensive than their Mirage kayaks

View attachment 30837

I used their original pedal drive almost 10 years ago, and it was great for a super-quiet early morning fishing session. The new-design fins flip back when encountering underwater obstacles.

Do you know if anyone else is in this kind of niche market product?
This looks very interesting. My only real concern is the long term durability of an inflatable. A solid kayak lasts forever if treated well. How would an inflatable fair in the long term?
 

cphubert

Member
Messages
9
Reaction score
8
long term durability of an inflatable
I have a seaeagle 420 inflatable kayak that is over 10 years old and is in very good condition. I clean and dry after use apply a UV blocker at least once a year and store the boat partially inflated in a shed. The real issue (IMHO) with a decent inflatable is it will never perform like a hard boat, I also have a hobie outback and a few canoes. They all have their advantages and concerns, additionally they all need their preventative care. Inflatables never seem to perform as well as hard boats, but travel well and store easy. The Hobie warranty period on inflatables was shorter than hard boats have not looked in a long while and they used to be harder to get a decent resale price. Do not know if that is still true.
 
Top