How do you fish a wolly booger?

itchmesir

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Has anyone tried tieing two wolly buggers on the same tippet to increase your chances ?
There's a tactic in which you tie a nymph and then tie a bugger to it at the hook bend to make it look like something chasing a bug... Don't see why a tandem bugger wouldn't achieve the same thing though it could be tough to cast... I'd try it with an unweighted bugger with a weighted bugger tied to the bend... It'll lay out the best
 

Joni

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Has anyone tried tieing two wolly buggers on the same tippet to increase your chances ?
Sort of. I do a V in the tippet. One side longer than the other so they are staggered. And Yes I fish two different colors all the time. Have caught several doubles too.
 
M

mridenour

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Strip, swing, dead drift, jiggle, wiggle....just get it into the water and keep changing it up. Those things work so many different ways I can't count them.
 

chechem

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Strip, swing, dead drift, jiggle, wiggle....just get it into the water and keep changing it up. Those things work so many different ways I can't count them.
Agreed. Everything from deep into plunge pools on a heavy splitshot to working it at the surface like a mouse.

"Throw it and hang on!"

 

Joni

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This was a Type II sink line with a Crystal White Bugger on the short V and a Midnight Fire on the long (the black shadow in the water)


Same setup in the Uinta's
 

ten_fiver

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Give them a chance most everytime you fish. I found black buggers productive in muddy water, when nobody around me was catching anything (including live bait). Got that advice here just a few weeks ago.
This is true. I just had a situation like this a couple weeks ago. I went out with my father law who only fishes spinning gear. When we got to the river, the other fly fishermen were obviously nymphing. I watched them while I got my rod rigged up, and they didn't seem to have much luck. I turn back and see my father in law slinging hub-cap sized spoons and pulling in a fish every other cast.

So I figured it it might not be worth my effort to try and key in on what kind of nymph the fish were looking for if the hub-caps were driving the fish crazy. Well, maybe a big ugly bugger would **** them off too. It worked! I just threw them straight across, let them drift downstream a bit, then worked a retrieve with 6-8" strips.
 
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zug buggin

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It cant be fished wrong, i've caught trout fishung it under a large indicator in very fast water, hanging just above the water while the rod was sitting in a parked drift boat unmaned, while tangled in a branch just above the water
 

fredaevans

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How does one fish a bugger? Any way you want... Strip it. Drift it. High stick it. Swing it. It's the do everything fly.
The WB is the most versatile fly I've ever used. Thing looks a bit like 'everything.' Surface, slightly subsurface, deep .... thing just works. If I had to choose just one fly this would be 'it.'

As IM noted above the 'how' is anyway you want.

fae
 

chechem

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I almost always start the morning in streams by working a WB along undercuts, working downstream. It's great for just drifting against a bank as you quietly walk along.

This big boy was caught that way:

 

dwizum

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There's an article in this month's edition of American Angler that describes different styles of bugger and different ways to fish them. On the one hand, this seems like a great idea for an article. On the other hand, when it comes to buggers, it seems like you can do no wrong, so the article really only needs to be a few words long: "Try it one way, if it doesn't work, try something else."

This plays well into a common theme I see in a lot of discussions here. What makes a fly fishing attempt successful? Is it the fly or the presentation? People who have success fishing woolly buggers in so many different ways remind me of Tenkara anglers who will use a single fly with many different presentation styles. Both groups of anglers appear to back up the argument that success has more to do with presentation than the fly.
 

wolfglen

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I have a question: I've tied a fly which is similar to a wooly bugger (the first fly I saw like this was the Housatonic black booger from the 60's but with peacock herl body and did an article for Florida Sportsman about using trout flies for bass in Florida about 1980).
Okay the version I fished a lot was tied with a clipped deer hair body instead of chenille and surface fished.

I'd like to know the opinions of the guys out there as to if this should be considered a wooly bugger or a different fly?

Jack
 

ia_trouter

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We'd probably have to see a pic to share our opinion. You know much more about the evolution of flies than most of us. From my understanding the wooly bugger evolved from the wooly worm that had no tail right? Hasn't the traditional wooly body always been constructed of chenille or some earlier version of yarn?

As you've stated many times Jack. Nothing is really new. But all hobbies naturally evolve. Sometimes it's truly more effective, and sometimes it's just a new method to the same end. All good in my opinion.
 

dwizum

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We'd probably have to see a pic to share our opinion. You know much more about the evolution of flies than most of us. From my understanding the wooly bugger evolved from the wooly worm that had no tail right?
I've always seen the worm with a small red tag tail, that's how I learned to tie it at least. Bugger with marabou tail of course. And typically the hackle on the worm is palmered so the fibers angle forwards instead of backwards.
 
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