How do you guys anchor your kayaks while lake fly fishing?

karstopo

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“One anchor with a minimum of 30' of anchor rope. 50' is better. The anchor must have a very bright and visible anchor ball that is tethered to the line. When going back to your ball from up to a mile away, you must be able to see it! Don't use little styrofoam floats. White or blue colors are horrible. I use a small inflatable fender that is bright orange. You can pick one up at any marine supply store. Your anchor should be a little heavier than the one you use in the bay. Use a 3-5lb anchor. Either a claw or bruce style anchor will work. Do not buy a small danforth. You'll never get it out of the mud. I like to use a short length of chain in between my anchor rope and my anchor. It serves to help dig the anchor in.

2. Your anchor must have a quick release clip. You do not want to be fumbling with a knot as a big fish is tearing line off your reel. You need to be able to unclip your anchor from your boat and throw the whole thing overboard. This will give you room to fight the fish without the worry of getting hung up on the anchor (in most cases). Also, you may want to consider using a 2-3 foot section of bungee cord in between your anchor ball and your clip. This will absorb the wave action and make your day on the water alot more comfortable.”

I cut and paste this from a sticky topic on the BTB section of TKF. There’s a big community of kayakers that fish beyond the breakers, BTB, and anchor up offshore. Seems like it might apply to a lake, but might be a bit of overkill for some lakes.
 

HART

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I use a homemade chain anchor the most. Several different lengths which can be added or subtracted as different weights are needed. Almost never gets snagged. I covered each piece with a section of bicycle tube to quiet contact with the bottom. Convenient for drifting also.
 

Rip Tide

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As I'm very new I'm compelled to ask, what are the pros and cons of casting from a sit inside kayak?
I use a sit-in kayak and it's all about protection from the elements.
My kayak only sees use in salt water and sometimes it's pretty rough out there, plus it helps to keep my lily white legs out of the sun
The only disadvantage for me is the old school small cockpit.
It's not easy to get in and out of and I've made myself look like a clod often enough so that I don't like to embark/disembark in public :eek:

As for the anchor..... I NEVER use one
The idea of being swamped by a rouge wave or a thoughtless boater's wake is enough to scare me off
(plus it's one thing less that I have to deal with)
However, sometimes I'll pull up next to a lobster buoy and stick one of it's knots under my rigging.
When you're waiting for false albacore to cycle through their recognisable pattern, it's best to remain in the proper casting distance..
 

gpwhitejr

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As I'm very new I'm compelled to ask, what are the pros and cons of casting from a sit inside kayak?
The sit-inside protects my legs and feet from the sun (I burn easily) and is drier. But it doesn't carry as much gear as accessibly as the SOT. Also mine only has one fitting for a rod (I guess I could add more if I weren't lazy), so if I am taking more than one rod I will use the SOT which is covered with t-track and other fittings for attaching stuff. Also, the sit-inside has fewer things for line to get tangled on; not a problem with spinning rods but something to think about when fly fishing. The sit-in is lighter, too, so for a quick outing by myself to the local pond that makes it more convenient.
 

karstopo

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SINKs have a lower center of gravity than SOTs. Your weight is often at or below the water line in a SINK. SINK don’t self bail and that scares some people off. My WS Commander 140 is an open SINK. I don’t take it into the open Gulf of Mexico, but do go into open bays and it handles chop quite well. All that open space allows me to put my extra rods right in the hull. I strip the fly line onto the spare set ups, helps to distribute the line more evenly. My feet are below the water line making for really stable standing while casting. Standing up is a huge advantage over sitting when scouting for fish and fish sign.

I only anchor in water up to about 4 feet deep. I use a stake out pole tethered with shock cord to the kayak. A section of shock cord in any anchor or stake out combination helps prevent sudden jerks. I have a strip of Velcro for quick release if desired. Fishing around the ICW means massive boat wakes and the quick release allows me to ride out the waves.

A drift anchor is nice to carry in open water. They are like wind socks and come in different sizes. Drift anchors slow down wind powered drifts and help control the angle of the drift. If I was to anchor in deeper water, I’d probably try the system I mentioned in a previous post. Being able to release from the anchor quickly is a nice feature.
 

ramjet

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I have both a SOT and a SINK. Neither are tricked out. Warmer temps and/or desire to get in/out and wade, I'll be in the SOT.

Anchor wise, I use chain, works for dragging in a river too..and doesn't get stuck as often in underwater branches etc. I've just been running it with a line from the cockpit for release/depth adjustment, through a carabiner attached at the stern. A separate (different color) line leads from cockpit to another carabiner clipped between the boat and the anchor, so I can pull the chain up to where I am and set it on the deck (otherwise it would be dragging off the back collecting weeds).

In a lake setup, there can be a good deal of "swing" depending on wind variability and how much scope you have out of course.

As Karstopo mentioned, I also have a "drift sock". Mine is a true feat of redneck engineering...a piece of blue tarp I sewed into an open-ended cone with grommets for attachment points. The bottom of the funnel opening is weighted with some 3/8 fishing weights and the top has some foam, both are secured with (you guessed it..) grey duct tape. I set this up to facilitate fly fishing in a windy salt water lagoon for barracuda. I'd hook a fish and by the time I'd landed and released it, I'd be way out in the lagoon while bouncing all over the place. With the bag, I'd set the hook, secure my paddle, and chuck the bag overboard. The bag slowed me quickly, and put my back comfortably into the wind while I figured out how to release a pissed off 'cuda with my plastic floating pliers.

HTH.
 

Houdygirl

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I have a hobbie outback that I use in Mission Bay San Diego which can get pretty windy. After lugging around a collapse anchor on a line and not using it I set up the anchor on a trolley system that is easy use when rerigging or wanting to position myself,to the tide shift.
 

GloveMan

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Try a Scotty Mount. I use it on a 12 foot Native Watercraft Yak. It works great because it is hands free, just pull up the anchor until it locks in place, give it a tug to release it at the next spot. Choose an anchor that fits your needs. I use an anchor that is both flared and closed based on where I am fishing. In Nebraska, Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana it really helps improve my day on the water. Was just up fishing at Spinney for big Rainbows and Cuts and the wind really picked up. Dropped a flared anchor and was able to maintain my position so I could throw big hoppers at the wind swept banks. Clobbered some absolute pigs between 5-6 pounds.

https://smile.amazon.com/Scotty-Anc...tty+kayak+anchor+system&qid=1634051007&sr=8-5

 

GloveMan

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Try a Scotty Mount. I use it on a 12 foot Native Watercraft Yak. It works great because it is hands free, just pull up the anchor until it locks in place, give it a tug to release it at the next spot. Choose an anchor that fits your needs. I use an anchor that is both flared and closed based on where I am fishing. In Nebraska, Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana it really helps improve my day on the water. Was just up fishing at Spinney for big Rainbows and Cuts and the wind really picked up. Dropped a flared anchor and was able to maintain my position so I could throw big hoppers at the wind swept banks. Clobbered some absolute pigs between 5-6 pounds.

https://smile.amazon.com/Scotty-Anc...tty+kayak+anchor+system&qid=1634051007&sr=8-5

The flared anchor option allows you to reduce the weight of the anchor which is nice in a small craft adn yet when you need some staying power open the flares and take a bite of the bottom to hold you in place.
 

Lamarsh

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I have a 14' wilderness systems fishing kayak that I use occasionally for stillwater fly fishing on a few of our little local lakes. I went out last weekend and the wind got annoying. I would get a cast out and would immediately need to paddle back out. I have read about pulley systems, but for a lake that is average 10-20' deep is that a good idea or am I going to get blown around, but just tethered to a single point?
Any appropriate sized anchor is fine, but for the problem you're looking at you might consider a drift sock.
 

Chasing_Tails

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I have been running a double anchor setup on a trolley system since my first fishing kayaks. There are two separate trolleys, one for the bow, one for the stern. For water less than 15ft with low current I use 25ft of 550 paracord and a 3lb downrigger ball both fore and aft. The issue I always had when I started was I would anchor off of a single point and the boat would freely swing with the wind. With the two anchor system you can set the anchor that will be into the wind first, then use the second anchor to stop the rotation and set your direction.

The paracord runs from the trolley carabiner back to the cockpit and through a captive jam cleat for one handed operation for both deployment and retrieval of the anchor. Excess anchor line is stored in a mesh rope bag in the cockpit.

IMG_5372.jpg
 

JoJer

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I don't, won't, can't use any kind of kayak. I graduated from float tubes to a 16' canoe. I made and used different types of anchors over the years and settled happily on a nylon mesh bag in sort of a small laundry size, maybe 24"-30" on the long side by 12'-18" on the bottom edge with a drawstring closure. When I need an anchor, I fill it with rocks, and tie any excess space in the bag in a single overhand knot. Then, The anchor line has a surgeon's loop at the end. The loop goes over the knot in the bag, then I add a couple of half hitches over that. The anchor line runs through a pulley at the bow, then through several pieces of tubing screwed to the aluminum frame top rail inside the boat, then through a jam cleat at the rear seat.
In use, this system keeps the anchor above the water, outside the boat, with very little slack so it doesn't swing around.
Some places I've fished in the past, I carried a second, smaller anchor bag so I could keep the boat parallel to the bank for two or more anglers.
 
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