I am on the verge of quitting

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pszy22

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I spend alot of time on a very popular river so I get to watch alot of people fly fish. Generally speaking, I see two types of folks - those who spend their time fishing and catching fish / those who spend their time casting.

For many if not most fishing situations involving moving water, you do not need to / nor should you be fishing more than 25' of line. To be honest and perfectly blunt, it's pretty hard NOT to be able to get 25 feet of line out on the water in front of you.

Where the problem comes, is when folks start to see how far they can cast. There is nothing wrong with that, if that is what you enjoy doing. My point is, it's USUALLY unnecessary if your main goal is to catch fish.

I realize this may be an unpopular opinion, but I'd encourage you to spend a half hour or so next time you our out to try fishing 3 rod lengths of line and see how it goes.

In any case, the most important thing to remember is - have fun.
 

rsagebrush

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I concur most people fish too much line and presentation and line control suffer, I believe most fish are caught around 35 feet or less.
Also maybe fly fishing is not a good fit for you, golf wasn't for me.
 

troutn

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I am not a golfer, but I seem to draw similar conclusions with those that are not happy with their golf swing and also their casting. I have been at this for 11 years and I was a spin fishermen before. I rarely use the roll cast. I am not the best caster, but it is a work in progress. I catch fish and have a good time. Currently I ham trying to learn similar anchors with Spey casting and feel uber challenged. I like a challenge and that is the primary reason that I enjoy our passion so much.

Hang in there and you will get it.
 

mirabelasunshine

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First off Carl McNeil's casts are beautiful. Wow.
Second thing I noticed watching all those videos is how little line they have out on the water. I had probably 20+' of line on the water trying to roll cast it out. I wonder if I have way to much line out.
Maybe ... but again, try to think in terms of fishing. There are dozens (hundreds?) of subskills related to fly fishing, and casting gets undue attention because of how visible it is.
 

mridenour

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Just don't cast very far. You can catch fish up close. Make being out there more about fishing than casting. Things will start to come together.
 

ia_trouter

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I spend alot of time on a very popular river so I get to watch alot of people fly fish. Generally speaking, I see two types of folks - those who spend their time fishing and catching fish / those who spend their time casting.

For many if not most fishing situations involving moving water, you do not need to / nor should you be fishing more than 25' of line. To be honest and perfectly blunt, it's pretty hard NOT to be able to get 25 feet of line out on the water in front of you.

Where the problem comes, is when folks start to see how far they can cast. There is nothing wrong with that, if that is what you enjoy doing. My point is, it's USUALLY unnecessary if your main goal is to catch fish.

I realize this may be an unpopular opinion, but I'd encourage you to spend a half hour or so next time you our out to try fishing 3 rod lengths of line and see how it goes.

In any case, the most important thing to remember is - have fun.
A lot of great advice being given. About three rod lengths of line will get it done for now. If not, find some different water for now. Spend some time on the other dozens of ways to improve your chance of catching fish. The cast will come around well enough and it doesn't really matter if it takes all season to add 5 or 10 feet. I do think fishing can be a distraction to casting fundamentals but catching a few is sure good for the attitude. It is about having fun.
 

mridenour

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I am not the best caster, but it is a work in progress. I catch fish and have a good time.
Ok, he isn't the best caster but he is very, very good. I've seen his casting and hope that I can eventually look this good tossing a fly someday (probably won't since I am naturally repulsive looking). But even a very accomplished person still sees flaws in their casting. You'll run into very few people that feel they have "arrived" at casting perfection.

Let the room for improvement drive you to continue, not to give up. Laugh at yourself when the line gets tangled or hung in a tree (I laugh more than most) and enjoy what you are doing and where you are doing it. If I am not fly fishing, I am working or watching TV or doing something else far less enjoyable. Fish a while and then when things go bad, sit down on the bank and check out the deer or birds or just listen to the water go by for a while and try again.

It isn't a contest, it is a pursuit. At the end of the day, there is tomorrow.
 

hokiehunter07

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First off were you trying to roll cast with a lot of line out? Secondly were you trying to roll cast with your line upstream coming down at you? Third if your shoulder is hurting I'm betting you're trying to muscle your cast aren't you?

Shorten up your casts. Start with only about 15 feet of line out. Fly fishing is all about smooth movements and abrupt stops. Are you roll casting with a dry fly or a nymph? Start with a high floating dry. Pull all the slack out of your line and start your cast with your rod tip pointing behind you making a "D" in the line. Smoothly accelerate forward to a sudden stop.

When doing this just for practice, face downstream and let the water pull your line. That way there is no slack in your line when you start the roll. Just keep roll casting downstream with a little bit of line out until you feel comfortable. After a while start moving up stream about 15 degrees at a time. Keep working on that roll. Eventually get to the point where you're casting perpendicular to the current or slightly upstream.

Once again make sure there's no slack line, use smooth acceleration, and a sudden high stop. Don't flail your arm. This is simple movements. Keep your elbow tucked to your side and only use your forearm.

It's easy for people who've done it forever and it's easy to forget that something as basic as roll casting can be tricky to a new fisherman. If you're using a big bass plug or something that chugs water roll casts can be very tricky.

Hokie.
 

zarick

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you guys are right. I am trying to put about 50' of line out which I can do with an overhead in my lawn just fine.
So I will shorten up and work with less line.
After watching more videos I think slack line is probably an issue for me. I had lots of it.
Third after reading your posts I think what I haven't figured out is how to let the rod do the work instead of my arm. Last night when I was trying (I guess I can't give up) in my yard I found when I stopped pushing the line it doesn't bomb out like a missile but it still gets there.

I am curious about my cortland though. I wonder if I should try a lighter line with it. It seems like it doesn't handle the 6wt line. It is a 5/6 slow action.
My casting instructor also told me to put a 7wt line on my echo solo 6wt rod which I did and the line shoots a whole lot easier now from it.

I still can't seem to not hit the ground behind me even though I am trying to keep my rod pointed straight up.
Maybe I need to just stick with 30-40' of line until I get good with that.
I can do 25' no problem, but that seem so close and the clackamas rivers deep spots are all on the other side.
 

hokiehunter07

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you guys are right. I am trying to put about 50' of line out which I can do with an overhead in my lawn just fine.
So I will shorten up and work with less line.
After watching more videos I think slack line is probably an issue for me. I had lots of it.
Third after reading your posts I think what I haven't figured out is how to let the rod do the work instead of my arm. Last night when I was trying (I guess I can't give up) in my yard I found when I stopped pushing the line it doesn't bomb out like a missile but it still gets there.

I am curious about my cortland though. I wonder if I should try a lighter line with it. It seems like it doesn't handle the 6wt line. It is a 5/6 slow action.
My casting instructor also told me to put a 7wt line on my echo solo 6wt rod which I did and the line shoots a whole lot easier now from it.

I still can't seem to not hit the ground behind me even though I am trying to keep my rod pointed straight up.
Maybe I need to just stick with 30-40' of line until I get good with that.
I can do 25' no problem, but that seem so close and the clackamas rivers deep spots are all on the other side.
If you're trying to roll cast a mile you need to look into a switch or spey rod as well as spey casting techniques. I'm in a similar situation where the larger rivers I fish are hard to reach with a 9' single handed rod. That said if I buy another rod any time soon my wife will probably choke me.
 

cab

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I can do 25' no problem, but that seem so close and the clackamas rivers deep spots are all on the other side.
25' should catch fish on any river. Seems like the good stuff is always on the other side, doesn't it? This is why I said earlier to concentrate more on fishing- approach, presentation, proper drift/swing, etc. There are fish- good fish- right there at your toes. Relax, catch a buncha them, and let your casting mature over time.

Like many others have posted: Have some fun.

HTH,
CAB
 

busbus

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Learn to laugh at yourself

Learn patience

It took hundreds of years for the first fisherman to progress from rocks to spears and you expect to cast well the first couple of times on the water. :lol2:

The first month on the river you shouldn't even be thinking about catching a fish, consider it as practice casting only. And if you do catch a fish just think how stupid he feels. :)



Your gonna be fine it just takes time brother.



Dave

What he said. :eek:)


I am much like the OP in that I never seem to be able to get on the water but at least he gets yard practice in, which is better than me. Well, I do get to practice on a very small pond at lunch and I take that time to simply cast. Pick a spot and try to hit it. I don't cast much farther than 35-ft unless the casting gods help it along its way.

I still stink at roll casting. Makes me think: maybe I should take time to practice that at the pond next week.....

Just have fun. Don't think too hard. And don't make something that is enjoyable into a contest or work. If you do that, where's the fun? I am a hack but even just casting during lunch makes me feel better. And if I happen to catch a fish, woo-hoo!

ray
 

zarick

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Just a quick thank you for all the responses. This has been a fairly encouraging thread. I almost expected folks to say something like.. well it's not for everyone go back to a spinning rod and have fun.
:)
 

mirabelasunshine

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Go catch a fish, any fish, take its picture, and post it here so we can all cheer for you.

Stay with it, it gets really good.
 

pszy22

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I can do 25' no problem, but that seem so close and the clackamas rivers deep spots are all on the other side.
You have to remember, the guy on the other side of the river wishes he could be fishing where you are standing.

Some one previously mentioned golf as an analogy, and it's a good point. The golden rule of golf applies perfectly to fly fishing -

You drive for show, you putt for dough.

And remember, have fun.
 

guest65

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Hi Patrick - at some point all the effort and voices and noise, however positive, probably start to get a little overwhelming. What can you do about your predicament? (My apologies to others here, I haven't read every single response on this thread.)

Do you fish with or know of anyone else who fly fishes in your locale who has a temperament you get along with? I'd talk with them first about where to start to correct your perceived difficulties, bit by bit. All the advice in the world on-line doesn't compare to somebody who is willing to pay attention, in person. Maybe that's a casting instructor, maybe not.

Find a way to try different gear than what you have. Not because your stuff isn't good, but sometimes other equipment brings different perspective. Find the wherewithal to go to an Orvis school/lesson, and let them know ahead of time about your issues. People who fish care a LOT about this kind of thing, and they will make the time to help out. You will also have a chance to meet other folks in similar situations at this kind of event, talk with them and be open and laugh about it - none of us here on the forum were ever very good when we started out either, (and I have put in 40 years but I have far more to learn, including some basics).

Above all, don't give up. You will gain immeasureably from working through these difficulties, and the pride you'll have eventually from knowing you did so will be well-earned.

Best of luck to you always, stay in contact with everyone here.
 

goby

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I'm probably saying whatever else has... First, don't roll cast. When I'm trout fishing I rarely if ever do it. Steelheading with heavy flies and weight is different, but for trout fishing, I almost never do it.

Second, become the predator. You've seen a cat or lion sneak up to their prey. That's what I do. I walk very slowly and never kick rocks. By doing that, I can get close to the fish.

I've been doing this for almost 20 years, and I know how to cast. But I almost never cast for distance. Sometimes it's necessary, but usually it's not. I walk very very slow, get close to the fish, and make a perfect 25 foot cast. My shortest cast was with my 2wt Orvis Superfine, and my 5 foot cast caught an 8lb steelhead on a dry fly.

My other thought is that you might have a mismatched rod/line. Expensive rods won't make you a great caster, but they sure help.
 

hokiehunter07

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I'm probably saying whatever else has... First, don't roll cast. When I'm trout fishing I rarely if ever do it. Steelheading with heavy flies and weight is different, but for trout fishing, I almost never do it.

Second, become the predator. You've seen a cat or lion sneak up to their prey. That's what I do. I walk very slowly and never kick rocks. By doing that, I can get close to the fish.

I've been doing this for almost 20 years, and I know how to cast. But I almost never cast for distance. Sometimes it's necessary, but usually it's not. I walk very very slow, get close to the fish, and make a perfect 25 foot cast. My shortest cast was with my 2wt Orvis Superfine, and my 5 foot cast caught an 8lb steelhead on a dry fly.

My other thought is that you might have a mismatched rod/line. Expensive rods won't make you a great caster, but they sure help.
Interesting take. I personally rarely do anything but roll cast when trout fishing. The only time I do a full cast is to dry my fly.
 

fishing hobo

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I think 50' rollcast is ambitious to say the least, especially for a learner. I struggled at the outset with roll casts, mainly because I was accelerating the rod too fast from the outset, I found it far better to start slowly once D-loop was formed and then accelerating more rapidly to a stop. I have to agree with those who say rollcasting is not really a cast to learn 1st. Overhead is far, far easier.
 
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