I am on the verge of quitting

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Bigfly

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About 1/2 of my fishing education was self inflicted....
That includes a tremendous amount of failure....and tangles...and broken rods....and severely bruised fishing ego. And thousands of hours......
The other half, has been old guys sitting and watching the water.....
who shared a tip....
You can learn this all on your own, but it would take two lifetimes......
We all wish you luck on your journey.
But I should add....fly fishing isn't really about luck.......
It's about knowing what the menu is, knowing fish behavior, and how to present the offering in such a way, that fish are amenable to eating.....simple...

Jim
 
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wee hooker

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I feel your pain , Brother!
I have been at this near 1/2 my life. I can fairly regularly throw a whole flyline with a heavy streamer but I can't roll cast 30'. Never could. Likely never will My solution (although an admittedly lax one) was to stick to open water fishing with plenty of room to back cast.

Tight Lines and DON"T EVER GIVE UP.
 
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barham

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I can relate to your frustration. I came from a golfing family and starting lessons when I was 7. I was a pretty good golfer but never really enjoyed the sport as I always frustrated with my game and the time it took me to play. Consequently I quit thirty years ago and never looked back.
As far as fly fishing is concerned, I am not a great caster or fisherman but I enjoy it and have fun. If I did not, I would quit and do something else.
I bet if you would just relax and keep all this in proper perspective, you would find it easier.
So much for my advice.
barham
 

fishing hobo

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Problem is, for me, casting is more than half of the fun of fly fishing so I rather have a day when I cast well and catch no fish to catching fish but getting very frustrated with my casts.... Fly fishing is far more enjoyable when you can cast well.
 

madison320

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When I first tried roll casting the line would just puddle up in front of me. Most of the videos I watched described a hatchet type downward chopping motion. That didn't work for me, what worked was more of a horizontal motion where the rod tip travels horizontal to the ground. The hatchet chop, at least for me, creates more of a vertical path of the rod tip and that's why the line was not going forward, it was following the path of the rod tip downward.

Maybe the vertical chop works for longer rods with heavier line, I mostly use a 7'6" 3wt.
 

fenix84

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I've been really crappy lately and pretty frustrated. The last 3 outings on my home water was not able to catch a fish. Had bites but was not able to reel any in. Today was the by far the worst though, prime water but no fish, not even a tug. Time to reevaluate my life.
 

tcorfey

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Fenix84, don't give in that easy. Sometimes you go through a slump, even pro-ball players do that, but they don't give up.

I can remember one especially frustrating day where the trout were leaving the water and jumping over my dry fly to get at the real bugs that were flying through the air. They were clearing the water by two-three feet sometimes and the pool I was working was no more than 15-20 feet across and 30-40 feet long. It was a very frustrating time, changing flies and using all my flies that I thought matched the real ones or worked on that water before. I left the pool with the trout still jumping. You just never know...

Yesterday, I was fishing a river that normally has one to two fish in each hole but the river was running kind of high, the weather was hot with bright sun, and there were no hatches and sporadic wind. I spied some big black ants, a couple of house flies and some other dark bodied stonefly nymphs when I lifted some rocks. I worked my way down through pocket water as I hiked a couple of miles in to the canyon. I started out fishing dark weighted nymphs on the bottom but, after two miles and lots of fishing/ changing weights, changing flies and changing fly sizes I had only one small trout to hand. I switched to dark lightly weighted soft hackles and still nothing going. Now I started back to the car, I put on a size 22 emerger and still nothing but I did get a couple trout rush up to look at it and I missed two takes and on the second take the fly went over my head and high in to a tree never to be seen again. I decided what the heck I may as well do something weird and put on a size 14 Royal Coachman dry with a bushy white post so I could see it in the fast water. I immediately started catching fish! As I worked my way back up I caught one fish in almost each hole where I was skunked before, I was laughing about how absurd it was. But it just shows you when all else fails try something that you think shouldn't work and you may be pleasantly surprised.

Regards,

Tim C.
 

fenix84

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I decided i ll go fish an easier river to help with my confidence. Thanks for the pep talk.
 

just4grins

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Zarick, one thing that needs to be fixed is your backcast. You are not stopping the backcast so it can open the loop and load the rod. On your backcast make the rod more vertical and at a 1:00 o'clock position stop the backcast and slightly push the rod straight up about a foot at the same time. This will accelerate line speed and open the loop, then make your forward cast. Think of this as tapping the brakes on the backcast, momentary stop and resume to complete the cast forward and then stop the forward cast at 10:00. You are casting your line more like whipping a horse, no hesitation to build line speed. Start with a shorter line and build to a longer cast later. Get the shorter cast built first and feel it. You may have too much action in the wrist, but slow the whole cast down first. There are more pieces but get the loop open first.
 

Scootermax

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I’m a 66 year old newbie, caught first trout 10 months ago. Like you, have had some frustrating moments, but love FF. I joined a FF club, everyone has been great & helpful. I practice a lot, watch casting videos (especially Lefty Kreh), fish often, watch other successful FF on the water, evaluate details when I catch a fish, tweak a little — try to repeat.
But—-I’m fishing stocked trout, using indicators, single fly, Clearwater medium/fast 4 wt rod, overlined 1 wt, roll cast most of time, trout seem spooky to me, I don’t like to move around a lot, when I do—slow, stay out of water if I can, relax, I try to not try so hard—it is difficult. I fish a lot of mop flies, trout magnets, egg patterns, wooly booger, stoneflies, sometimes pheasant tails, copper John, prince nymph. I try to get good drifts, adjust depth till I catch one. Most of the fish are close 15-20 feet, sometimes less, I prefer a nice current where fish don’t have a lot of time to eyeball the fly, they dart out and grab it. My best day so far was 26 trout, 2 were 18 & 19 inches. I catch & release.
Anyway, don’t give up, if I can do this, you can too.
 

JoJer

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I don't get out as much as I used to. A couple of times recently I was having problems with my casts and I thought, "Oh no! Something else I can't seem to do any more". Then I discovered I'd missed a line guide when I'd strung the rod. Another time, I found the line had gone under itself between the tip top and the second guide. This would never have happened if I'd done what I tell all new anglers to do when they string the rod: Hold the line against the rod and pull it taut with the other hand. Put a bit of curve in the rod and any "oopses" in the stringing will be evident immediately. Would have saved me a half-days worth of cussing.
 

Gotribe

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Keep your hands very soft - consciously relax them - and let the rod do the work. It’s like chopping wood or using a chef’s knife - you learn to let the axe and knife do the work, and your arms will not tire.
 

karstopo

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A couple of rods of mine, we have little dust ups every so often. I try to push them around too much and they object to that rough treatment. When I’m kind and gentle with them, they seem to take to that treatment much better. My Echo BAG 6 weight Quickshot is a rod that notorious for this. It’s very temperamental about how I cast it.

Most of my rods, I get in the groove pretty quickly and sort of stay there, That 6 weight Quickshot is a different deal. I might get in a groove for a bit, then it just completely comes of the rails. I haven’t nailed down what is exactly going on with me and this rod. I think it does pretty well when it’s right, it’s just been tougher to stay right. Any other rod I might make a sort of bad cast or two, but can get right back on track with a little adjustment. Hadn’t gotten there yet with the 6 weight Quickshot. Not giving up, just going to keep working on it.
 

jfh245

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Hopefully, you'll be able to get out more often this year. Sounded like you were very busy and had limited free time. Never, ever give up. The personal reward far outweighs the frustration.
Here's my limited advice:
1. never quit
2. ask your instructor for advice. a good instructor could see the problem quickly and should be happy to help. You paid for a lesson, problems with your
cast have arisen, and I'm sure he wants you to succeed and let others know how he helped. No-one wants an unhappy customer and his solution and
your positive comments to others is good for his business and reputation.
3. videotape yourself casting
4. relax- flyfishing is rewarding and enjoyable with immeasurable personal satisfaction.
 

Bigfly

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Know someone who lives 5 hours from water, never practices knots/casting, and wants a fish when they go fishing.
I suggested shuffle board might be their sport. HA!

Zaric, I like that you are trying to practice. The majority of fishers do not. Keep at it....Find a pool....
Hoping since this an old post you have it going on.....

Lets talk roll casting.....I teach this cast before any other because it's so easy and useful.
The mantra is "slow up, fast down". It helps some people to actually say this out loud.
First, raise the rod slowly (while keeping your elbow down) to 35 degrees past vertical, STOP. The stop, is key to success.
Many overhand casters try to maintain momentum, do not do this!!!!
At this point, look down and make sure you have some line touching the water...2-3 feet is good to start with. Later you can add more line, but start short first. I can roll out 40-60 feet without an issue or effort.
If you don't have some line touching the water prior to the cast, it will go straight up, not out. (Someone described this, it's a tell tale clue of a blown anchor.) From the stop position, karate chop hard and fast at the water. I have my students aim at the top of a bush or tree on the other bank. Many people who overhand cast dries, aim at the water. Don't do this....... We are trying to open up our loop, not throw darts. Learn to do this on both sides of your body. This is a great cast for windy conditions too. I tell people that the rod it like a flag pole, and the line (like a flag) should always be on the downwind side of the rod. That avoids the common tangle around the rod trick..which is also a good way to nick your rod, so it can break later.....
Use only one hand to start with, locking off the line under your finger on the corks. When done properly, you can shoot line without hauling.
This cast is extremely accurate repeatedly, doesn't need a fish spooking false cast, and you stop losing flies in the bushes.
Win, win, win.......learn it, then don't leave home without it.!
Have fun!


Jim
 
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spoonplugger1

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I cast before I buy, I don't adjust to rods, not the way it's supposed to work. It's a tool, I wouldn't buy a hammer that's not up to the job either.
 

shadowwalker

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I cast before I buy, I don't adjust to rods, not the way it's supposed to work. It's a tool, I wouldn't buy a hammer that's not up to the job either.
So you only buy one hammer , a really big one I take it. It will after all drive every thing from a fence post to a thumb tack. Sometimes what we say sounds very different to others. I for one, never teach my fly fishing students how to cast, they already know how to cast. I teach them how to interpret the feel of a fly rod. Casting is a generic term and not specific to the fly rod as an accurate instruction of known quantity.
 

shadowwalker

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I cast before I buy, I don't adjust to rods, not the way it's supposed to work. It's a tool, I wouldn't buy a hammer that's not up to the job either.
So you only buy one hammer , a really big one I take it. It will after all drive every thing from a fence post to a thumb tack. Sometimes what we say sounds very different to others. I for one, never teach my fly fishing students how to cast, they already know how to cast. I teach them how to interpret the feel of a fly rod. Casting is a generic term and not specific to the fly rod as an accurate instruction of known quantity.
 
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