If You Use a Two Hand Rod;

Ard

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If you use a Spey rod for fishing and intend to come to Alaska you probably don't need a heavier rod. That is if your rod is at least an 8/9 for King salmon or a 6/7 for all other species. Like single hand rods the reel and its drag will be where you want to concentrate. I love my old spring and pawl reels but if you get into a 20 pound plus fish with a clicker it might not go as well as you would want. I have a 13' 8/9 and it handles everything from a small trout to a nice big king.

I just thought I'd put this out there for people who look through these threads.

Ard
 
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Ard

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The rod I speak of here (13' 8/9) has caught fish ranging from 11" Dolly Varden Char to King Salmon over 40 pounds. We just came back from a trip where it was used for surf / bay fishing and it landed a very nice bunch of silvers from 9 - 14 pound.

In short the rod (LL Bean Stream Light 13' 8/9) will handle anything I have so far had take a fly.

Ard

---------- Post added at 03:31 PM ---------- Previous post was at 02:29 PM ----------

 

afman87

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I'm sure its been a few years since you were a beginner to fishing with a spey rod but do you have any recommendations for some one who wants to learn? Rod weight? Length? Price range?
 

texastroutbum

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Ard, I have been lurking at the Spey forum for a while and it appears that a large number of members suggest for a 4 wt for trout. So I am leaning toward that. But you seem to suggest that 6 or 7 weight can deal with trouts in Alaska.
I am confused. Please enlighten me. I am just guessing that the rivers in Alaska has so many species that 4 wt can be outgunned when or if you hook a king, and so it is safe to go with 6 or 7 wt. But as you can see I am in the dark.
 

afman87

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i'm no expert by any means but a 4 wt seems to be pretty light for up here. While I use a 3 wt in the smaller creeks and sloughs most of the Bigger rivers IE ones better suited for a spey rod seem to be moving at a pretty good pace. Also like you said its easy to get outgunned in a hurry up here. Just the other day I was fishing for grayling with my 3 wt on a good sized river and I had kings and dogs swimming right by my fly. Luckily I didn't have any unwanted takers but I had never seen those fish that far up before. Not to mention the dollies and trout can get huge up here. I watched a guy the other day fight for his life while fishing for rainbows and hooked a 20+ dolly in some pretty fast current... he was using a 5 wt. I love the light weight fight but only for selective applications. Just my 2 cents take it for what its worth.
 

Ard

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Ard, I have been lurking at the Spey forum for a while and it appears that a large number of members suggest for a 4 wt for trout. So I am leaning toward that. But you seem to suggest that 6 or 7 weight can deal with trouts in Alaska.
I am confused. Please enlighten me. I am just guessing that the rivers in Alaska has so many species that 4 wt can be outgunned when or if you hook a king, and so it is safe to go with 6 or 7 wt. But as you can see I am in the dark.
I'm using rods in the 770 grain range (8/9/10) weight in single hand rods for almost everything. I only use my little light rods where I know there will be only small fish. With my rod, trout are fun and when I pick up a salmon there is no panic.
 

Guest1

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Ard, I have been lurking at the Spey forum for a while and it appears that a large number of members suggest for a 4 wt for trout. So I am leaning toward that. But you seem to suggest that 6 or 7 weight can deal with trouts in Alaska.
I am confused. Please enlighten me. I am just guessing that the rivers in Alaska has so many species that 4 wt can be outgunned when or if you hook a king, and so it is safe to go with 6 or 7 wt. But as you can see I am in the dark.
I would not look at weight of the rod / size of fish , with spey rods. Look at the size of the water. Spey rods are a delivery system for a fly. Farther away needs longer heavier rods. The fish is not the important factor here. If you think 4 wt for Trout and can't reach them the rod is worthless. If you have a 17 ft. 11 wt with a long belly line and are fishing a spot 40' wide the rod is almost useless. Less useless than the 4 wt that can't reach the fish though.
 
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