if you were a psychiatrist, how would yo classify a fly fisherperson>

alfaromeo

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note female or male...or male and female... trying to be fair there... sorry on the title.. tryed to fitx it,, was to later
 

jpakstis

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When I was at the river last weekend and I kept drifting nymphs right through this hole with between 2-5 rainbows holding and avoiding whatever I drifted through there for hours I kept reminding myself of the quote (misattributed to Einstein) that “insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result.”
 

Acheron

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Fitting with jpakstis...I'd classify some of them as crazy because they keep posting the same stuff expecting different results :)

Ok, and just to be fair that's not the ONLY reason I'd classify them as crazy :D
 
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mtboiler

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Beginner fly fisherman are manic obsessive for sure border line Bipolar!! Mode swings wildly as they either get skunked or catch one fish then they think they have it figured out to only get skunked the next trip and slip further into depression. Which leads to alocoholism.
After a year or two, obsessive compulsive....trying to catch that one fish because it is there. And sticking to it to your last dying breath. Which leads to narcissism after you start to catch fish regularly as you believe you can catch any fish at any time because you are just that good!!
Once you figure out it is not about catching fish it is about just being out and enjoying the experience...leads to dissociation disorders in which you would far rather be alone than with other people.
And don't even get me started about tying your own flies which leads to anxiety when your friends come over and ask what you are tying these days!!
Not to mention when that one guy approaches you on the river and you know he is about to high hole you. You give him that corner of the eye death stair but he keeps coming. Anxiety and paranoia builds to a crescendo when he walks up to you and says hello and asked if anyone else walk upstream because he wants to go a mile or two upstream. At that time you breath a sigh of relief grit your teeth and say no and he continues on his merry way tossing you a beer as he goes by. At which time you feel depression and schizoid personality disorder creep in because you were so strung out all you can do is mutter a low toned thank you!
Which leads to bouts of self doubt and low self esteem because you just lied to the guy that no one else was up there when you knew 5 other guys had gone up there to keep the hole you are fishing to yourself and he gave you a beer because he was happily thinking he was going to be the only other person up there! Which leads to panic attacks wondering how long it will take him to walk the two miles up and back so that you can fish for another hour or two before you have to get out of there before he comes back after he finds out you lied to him.

Through out the entire process most fly anglers develop attention deficit disorder and work and home because you cannot focus on anything other than fly fishing.
 
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okaloosa

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when I was doing my psychiatry rotation in medical school I asked my young psychiatry attending (professor) who is now almost 40 years later the President of the medical school if I had some type of problem because of my possible obsession with fishing the Salmon River. He just smiled and said that it is good to be passionate about something. People who are not passionate about anything are lost souls.
 

flytie09

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Fly anglers are maniacal. Folks standing in water for hours on end purporting to admire nature while jabbing its creatures with a hook only to let it go. Reveling in this sadistic kind of cat and mouse game.....

The angler fixates on himself always bragging about their exploits, acquisitions or the latest trends in tackle or fashion. They take pictures of fish or flies just to post it all over social media to fuel their ego.

This "hobby" becomes an obsession. Masking their internal thoughts and obsessive compulsion nature with knot preparation, line maintenance, and other minutia that is part of the sport. These things are all fixated on and rationalized at length.

What kind of sick, selfish, sadistic monster this lot is? Immediate deep treatment and cognitive refrainment is prescribed.

Who wants to go fishing?
 
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alfaromeo

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A determined SOB.
one willing to get up before dawn, wade into a freezing river.... wave a stick for hours on end... tie a really small fly one, with very cold fingers.....to try outsmart a fish with a brain as small as a pea...get outsmarted over and over again.......and then get up the next morning wade into the freezing river,,,,at least our wifes and g/f will know we will never cheat on them,,we are to busy freezing in some river
 

Ross_S

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They would probably classify them as a person with a hobbie. Everyone that has a hobbie that they love wants to think they are crazy for doing it, or wants to brag about how hard it is, or how much money they spend on it. The best way to enjoy something is to just enjoy it, don't worry about what other people think
 

markmark444

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If you cut yourself badly while fishing and your first thought is to rub blood on your fly, it is fair to say have moved over the line from focused to obsessed.
 

LePetomane

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when I was doing my psychiatry rotation in medical school I asked my young psychiatry attending (professor) who is now almost 40 years later the President of the medical school if I had some type of problem because of my possible obsession with fishing the Salmon River. He just smiled and said that it is good to be passionate about something. People who are not passionate about anything are lost souls.
I didn't do a psych rotation in medical school but this answers the op's question accurately.
 

Unknownflyman

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I dont think I was obsessed with fly fishing maybe a bit because of all the stories of Montana from my mentor. In reading Trey Combs book, learning that there is steelhead in the most beautiful part of Minnesota and I caught a wild one after three days of hard fishing and freezing to death, camping in the north woods in the beginning of April. That was trip that changed my life, I truly learned what it took for a fly caught steelhead and I loved it, all of it.

Finally learning spey fishing and hanging out with people that are hardcore as well from the US, Canada and Europe, it has not helped.

In the lost coast film about the area and fish, they describe what happened to people, when people from the east, brought, flies and Atlantic Salmon tactics to the west coast. while I was not into spey yet and young, what they describe as to people obsessed, that was me in 1988 after my first trip.

Even regular fly fishers look at me in disbelief. Four days, yeah, got one tug, yeah, 34 degree water and temps in the teens, snow, occasional dangerous ice flows, yeah. one pull and you lost it, you lost the fish. yeah, well it came off, and you say this was a good time? yeah it was good.
 

alfaromeo

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I dont think I was obsessed with fly fishing maybe a bit because of all the stories of Montana from my mentor. In reading Trey Combs book, learning that there is steelhead in the most beautiful part of Minnesota and I caught a wild one after three days of hard fishing and freezing to death, camping in the north woods in the beginning of April. That was trip that changed my life, I truly learned what it took for a fly caught steelhead and I loved it, all of it.

Finally learning spey fishing and hanging out with people that are hardcore as well from the US, Canada and Europe, it has not helped.

In the lost coast film about the area and fish, they describe what happened to people, when people from the east, brought, flies and Atlantic Salmon tactics to the west coast. while I was not into spey yet and young, what they describe as to people obsessed, that was me in 1988 after my first trip.

Even regular fly fishers look at me in disbelief. Four days, yeah, got one tug, yeah, 34 degree water and temps in the teens, snow, occasional dangerous ice flows, yeah. one pull and you lost it, you lost the fish. yeah, well it came off, and you say this was a good time? yeah it was good.
[/QUO
on youtube, there is some guy surfing a ice flow, fly fishing
 

dipaoro

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If you cut yourself badly while fishing and your first thought is to rub blood on your fly, it is fair to say have moved over the line from focused to obsessed.
I hooked my finger recently - very deep - and had to figure out how to get the hook out. Google had a nice video and with a bit of pain, I got the fly out of my thumb. This dry had my blood all over it and I proceeded to use it. Caught a nice brown trout with it.

So my daughter (22 in age) says to me today, what is your problem with Fly fishing? I replied, what problem do you mean? She replies, how many rods do you own at this point...20? I reply, do I count the new rod arriving tomorrow? I also told her these rods are worth at least $500 each on Ebay. But, make sure when I die to put a rod in the casket. She replies why would I do that when I can sell it for $500. You are died anyways.

 
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