In memoriam

yikes

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Here in the LA area, I've been watching our few trout streams get devoured by fire in the last 11 days. I find myself saying "well, that one's gone, but at least we still have this other area to fish", only to see that one overwhelmed on the fire maps 1-2 days later.

The latest map this morning shows the fire has engulfed this canyon, which had IMO the most beautiful campground in the Angeles National Forest.

 

dswice

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yikes - very sad indeed. Looking to the future, when these fires subside, I wonder if Trout Unlimited or other conservation groups will put together an Action Plan for some of our beloved trout streams and rivers in these devastated areas?
 

jbe

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It's been hard to watch the Bobcat fire cut straight through Angeles Forest with those blue lines dead center. Hoping it will recover in time.
 

mcnerney

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Very sad indeed! I sure hope that the fire fighters can get all these fires under control. Here in Pinedale, WY the air quality has been awful from all the smoke coming in from the west coast. I can only imagine how bad it is out there.
 

darkshadow

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Looks like the Gender Reveal Fire burned through a little gem hidden in a canyon as well.

You have the one that decimated the Kern and the GTW....

Gonna be an eerie landscape for a few. Hope the rainy season doesn't produce too many slides that will bury current trails.
 

tomsakai

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Horrible. I was just starting to enjoy the West Fork. Previously I had been focusing on the Santa Ana River drainage, also impacted by fires.
 

mikemac1

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As much as the fires create uncomfortable short-term impacts to the ecosystems in the San Gabriel mountains, they will recover. In the 1950s and 60s as I grew up in Pasadena very close to the base of the San Gabriels, there were fires—some large and scary. The blue lines recovered. The best case study in recovery are the 1988 fires in Yellowstone. In September 1988 after the fires were out, it was dooms day, yet within a few years there was ample evidence that all things in the ecosystem had benefited from the fires. This was especially true of the watersheds where the fires help put important nutrients into the streams. Fire is natural and recovery is too.
 

tomsakai

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My retired fireman friend (avid fly fisherman) has told me that these recent fires are much hotter and partially sterilize the soil such that the native trees will not repopulate. He showed me the road up to Kennedy Meadows (south) as a prime example where the prior pines have been replaced by I think scrub oak. The South Fork Santa Ana fire 6-8 years ago caused large sediment flows downstream that has adversely impacted much of the main river. Friends who have fished the South Fork this year report no signs of fish. I fear that the WF will not recover in my 10-15 years remaining of fly fishing.
 

goofnoff1

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In my neck of the woods I know of streams that took 30 years to recover from Hurricane Agnes in '72.

These aren't "natural" fires.
 
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yikes

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Tom - a related side subject: a few years ago it was considered "environmentally friendly" to kill weeds using a black plastic tarp to basically bake the topsoil in the sunlight, in lieu of chemical treatment such as Roundup. After several years of this solar-powered approach, it was discovered that the heat also sterilized the soil of all beneficial bacteria and organisms.
I share your concern that today's fires burn much hotter than the slow grassland fires of pre-historic California.
 

yikes

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At last, here's some video of the burn area, including some of the riverbed.

Here's a still image from the video. You can see in the background that some alders were spared.

1602823588109.png
 
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