Inexpensive waterproof point-n-shoot

desmobob

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Re the Finepix XP-130....what's the close up image quality like? I think this is as important as a UV filter.Thanks in advance.
Here's an unedited close-up of some lichens and moss on a birch tree in my back yard. It was taken as a "Medium" size in "Fine" quality setting and had to be greatly resized to allow for posting here, so it lost some sharpness. It was a flat, gray morning.

I forgot to put something in for scale but the photo was taken at a distance of approximately 7-8".

Still, it seems plenty good for a cheap camera...
DSCF0067.JPG
 
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cpiercem

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I knew I shouldn't look at this thread! Now I have the "I wants" bad.

I have a Fuji Finepix XP10 12MP. I bought the camera in 2010 so it is 10 years old now and still taking good pictures. It is waterproof and shockproof.

I have dropped it, fallen in the water and on rocks with it, submerged it repeatedly, and had it fall out of my pocket on to the rocks, into the stream, and frequently both. All of that is when I thought I was being careful with it. :eek: I can attest that they are tough little buggers, and still take good pictures.

My husband thinks that I should just take my phone to take pictures with. :D It would never survive!

So far the only wear and tear the camera has sustained is that the markings have rubbed off of the rubber button cover. Also the rubber button cover on the back came loose on one side this last year. I glued it back down, but now I am not sure if the camera is fully waterproof anymore. It has gotten a quick dip or two since then with no harm, but I don't take any underwater pictures with it anymore, and hopefully I won't accidentally swim with it. :p

The only problem I have always had is that without reading glasses I can't see the back well enough to see what I am taking. So I end up with a good number of half framed pictures, but that is NOT the camera's fault.


You will enjoy your Fuji camera, and it will keep on going strong for you!




 
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Since this is an older post but with good info, I thought I'd ask if there is newer input. Want a waterproof point and shoot to use when fly fishing mostly but also for hiking, camping and general outdoor activities.
 

original cormorant

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Since going digital I've had 4 Olympus point and shoot camera's. The first two were "weatherproof" only.

The first one of these didn't survive a swim in a riptide that I was glad to survive, but this camera had a separate optical viewfinder. No point and shoot cameras now seem to have optical viewfinders. To me this is a serious omission for an outdoor camera as in bright sunlight and when wearing polaroids it is often impossible to see an LCD screen. These cameras generally have a lot of features which you may or may not use but choose a camera that gets a top rating for visbility of the LCD in sunlight.

For the record the second weatherproof one was retired in favor of a second hand fully waterproof TG2, which I then upgraded to a TG5
 

hatidua

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As we pack more megapixels into a given sensor size (often for marketing purposes), they don't always yield 'cleaner' results. Sometimes they do, sometimes they don't. Without diving deep into the technical aspects of the craft, I use a long-since discontinued Canon S100 in a waterproof housing (after having owned and tried multiple newer models). In the past six months both of these images have been used from that S100 platform and the overall size of the tool/s is very small:

Screen Shot 2021-02-05 at 7.59.58 PM.pngScreen Shot 2021-02-05 at 8.00.18 PM.png
 

dynaflow

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Earlier versions of the popular Point 'n Shoot cameras lacked a decent Macro, and that's a priority for me to capture images of Flies.
It's as important as a UV filter IMHO.So having said that,what's the go these days in cameras with those attributes?
 

hatidua

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Earlier versions of the popular Point 'n Shoot cameras lacked a decent Macro, and that's a priority for me to capture images of Flies.
If you can tolerate the size/weight penalty, I think I'd carry a purpose-built tool for that role rather than a point & shoot camera which by design is a do-everything device that doesn't specialize in anything.

Screen Shot 2021-02-06 at 10.02.59 PM.png
 

LePetomane

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I do a lot of hobby photography and like the Fujifilm and Sony products a lot. I have an old XT-1 (They're up to the XT-4 now) that takes great photos. It is a little bulky but I don't carry much when I fish other than a small waist pack. My full frame Sony is just too big and heavy. The optical zoom on the Finepix is a nice feature.
 

jeep.ster

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My new FinePix XP-130 camera impresses the heck out of me! I read the manual and was pleased but it seemed to be lacking a lot of information. It turns out the printed manual that comes in the box is very condensed and the complete manual is on line. I downloaded it. Holy cow! This little $110 camera does nearly everything my full-sized DSLRs will do!

Some test shots in the yard seem excellent and as sharp as I would hope. Out of focus areas are not distracting. A couple of brick wall shots show very little distortion at either end of the zoom range. The test shot attached has lost some fine detail due to the resizing done by the forum software. (It's a horrible photo that I took just to look at fine detail and the out of focus areas.)

I'm happy to have a good-performing, pocket-sized and waterproof camera that I can carry on the water with no worries.

Now, I just need the ice to melt off the lakes and ponds, and for the April 1 trout opener to arrive.
I like my fujifilm xp95. I've had it for years now and still works great. At the time it cost almost twice as much as your xp130. It replaced my kodak p&s larger cam. I agree that all these cams look and perform similar to each other. The wifi worked perfectly with my lg smartphones. But since I got this samsung phone I have to try several times to connect.

 

hatidua

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Thanks for the great pic hatidua,but there must be a more suitable portable robust camera available.I've no desire to schlep heavy photographic equipment around a hot salt water flat :)
If you have a local camera store nearby, take your own memory card and one small fly (most little cameras tend to use SD cards now). Swap your card around to each P&S camera they have on display and shoot the same fly on the same background with the same lighting. Thank them for their help, take the memory card home and review the results on your screen at 100% file size. I suspect one will be better than the others.
 

RunNGun

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I started out with an Olympus 790sw and it worked great for a lot of years. It took such great pictures that when the view screen started to malfunction I went out and replaced it with the newest version at the time, the Olympus tg2. It has been equally as great. Really great macro and sport mode picture quality. They are very tough and waterproof too. I have actually thrown mine off the dock into the lake to the kids while they were swimming so they could use it. It would spend over an hour underwater suspended by its floating strap in between pictures and it never missed a beat. When it finally dies , I'm sure I will get the newest version at the time.
 
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