Is this a Midge?

Bigfly

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Heard the big midges called a Buffalo midge. We have them here as well....Those sz 12 zebra midges had to be tied for something! My faith in fishing the midge grows every year.......

Jim
 

AzTrouter

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I’d call it a midge and tie on a black #20 or #18 RS2, doped up and in the film or same size black bodied Parachute ‘Adams’ cast with plenty of slack tippit.
 

biker1usa

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Around here I tie a Palomino Midge in size 16 or 18 with hackle and a white angel hair wing and it seems to imitate the local midges like that one just fine. I've caught a lot of fish on this pattern. Just a "bench tie" I thought would work and it does.
 

planettrout

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I have put this link up before. It provides a fairly comprehensive look at Midges and patterns that can be used to imitate the various stages of their development. A lot of folks are intimidated at the thought of using Midges because of their small size. They are in the drift throughout the year and are most prolific in tailwaters. In stillwater, they are generally larger in size and are referred to as Chironomids. Below is their life cycle and these are the stages to imitate:



This is the link to Colorado Guide Flies. Scroll down to Chapter 2 and begin...

Colorado Guide Flies: Patterns, Rigs, & Advice from the State's Best Anglers ... - Pat Dorsey - Google Books

In most of the faster moving Western waters that I fish, I rarely use a midge pattern smaller than #22. Waters like the Swift River in Connecticut, can sometimes require patterns as small as #30...

Best Flies and Spots: Swift River Fly Fishing Intro | BlogFlyFish.com

Rick Takahashi"s and Jerry Hubka's " Modern Midges ", published in 2009 ,is also an excellent guide to tactics and patterns:

https://www.amazon.com/Modern-Midges-Fishing-Effective-Patterns/dp/1934753009

More about Midges from Westfly:

Midges

The largest Brown Trout that I have caught, in the last ten years, took a #20 Cream Miracle Midge on the East Walker River in Bridgeport,CA in May of 2012 - before the drought kicked in. I probably have tied more Midge representations than almost any other other insect. The exception being Baetis / BWO's...


PT/TB
 

Critter

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This is what I have found the carp to be feeding on ( or I believe they are) Chironomid, larva, they look similar to a small red translucent worm. I am now tying different patterns of them to see if I can trigger these damn carp to take more readily. By the time I think I got it figured out they will be on something else though. But those same midges are all over the place here, look like mosquitoes.
 

WadeK in to Deep

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Critter: "But those same midges are all over the place here, look like mosquitoes."
Mosquitos are a small part of the midge family.
 

silver creek

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Just got home... here are the two flies I was using. The one on the left was the ‘midge’ I was sold... the one on the right is a gnat?



And here’s a pic of a midge that landed right next to my fly!




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I think the fly you bought that you are calling a midge pattern is Trico spinner pattern. A Trico is not a midge. It is mayfly that are as small as midges. Note the long tails on your fly. Midges do not have tails like mayflies




A good midge pattern is a Griffith's Gnat. Midges tend to cluster and the Griffith's Gnat is a pattern for clustering midges.





 
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dcfoster

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Thanks Silvercreek, since I post to this I went out and bought all the materials necessary for the miss driveways but haven’t had them yet period if I wanted to use the treacle fly as a measure meditation, but I just have to cut the tail off? It seems to me it would look pretty similar to a midge.

Thanks for the Griffith’s gnat recommendation as well!

We live close to a lake, little shallow bays and river mouthes, and there are midges everywhere in the early spring so I really wanna get good at this midge thing!


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corn fed fins

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I've watched trout swim around on the surface, mouths wide open, scooping through clusters; like whales breaching through krill. I think three #16 4xl Griffiths tied onto the same loop would be as close I could get to representing that. lol Just fun to watch
 

silver creek

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Gary Borger's favorite size for the Griffith's Gnat is a size 14. It is the only size he carries.

He tied and gave me some. But I asked him to sign the container. These will not be fished!

Note the variation of the GN pattern on the right side with shorter hackle and a trailing shuck. I never asked him why?

 

WadeK in to Deep

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The time I got to watch many midge clusters, on the lower Owens River. I saw that 3 or more smaller midges (males, I think) would fly over to a bigger midge (female) that was just hatching and drag her out of her nymphal shuck, and the water. Then the clump would kind of drift away, bouncing and rolling over the water and picking up more males as it went, usually until they found their way into an eddie or other slack water or the reeds.
They were easy pickings while she was still stuck in the water - think stationary target. Not so much, after she hatched - think moving target.
 
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