Kayak education

Jonesdds

Member
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
Location
Park City, UT
Your message board is the second I’ve registered for, I’m in the market for my first fishing kayak.

I live 40:60 Park City UT: Santa Barbara CA. The kayak is going to spend March- September in UT, maybe all the time. But, I will probably have years its brought home to SB.

Im an avid fly fisherman and theres a number of lakes(maybe Green River B section when conditions permit) I would find a kayak to be a great option in UT, WY, etc.. I donÂ’t love tube fishing and some of lakes IÂ’d frequent would benefit from increased water coverage and ability to get home in windy conditions.

IÂ’ve narrowed to Jackson Kayak Mayfly(great setup for fly fishing), native Watercraft propel slayer 10.6(light), Pescador pilot 12.5 ft or OldTown Sportsman 10.6. First has no pedals but very well thought out for fly fishing. But, I like the idea of pedals to stabilize my position more quickly. ItÂ’s going to be fly fishing almost exclusively and while I might do some calm water ocean fishing 80%+ freshwater.

One of the benefits of the Mayfly is its built for fly fishing and the floor is very open for fly line. One of the issues with it is I see the benefits of hands free movement and stabilization with pedals, not an option with it. But thereÂ’s the issue with line,pedal entanglement. Heaviest kayak is the mayfly of my choices, so getting on my lifted Jeep(4-5 inches above stock) is also a concern. Maybe 60-90 lbs range doesnÂ’t make too much difference but some of the easier loading options, Hullvater and the Yakima option have 70 and 80 lb limits so might make the difference.

Love to hear opinions on this and sorry for the length.
 

tcorfey

Well-known member
Messages
1,853
Reaction score
403
Location
SF Bay area California
I have owned 4 Kayaks and 3 canoes, if I was in the market for another Kayak for still water and mild ocean I would be looking at the Eddyline 14' Caribbean Sit on top. It is a bit pricey but a very nice boat and at 14' long and only 50lbs. The hull is ABS so harder material than many of the other sit on tops which translates in to better speed and control. Read the reviews and it will give you some idea of what to expect. As with fly rods if you can find a place that will rent or let you try the kayaks you are interested in then it will help you make up your mind.

 

whalensdad

Well-known member
Messages
492
Reaction score
12
Location
Old Saybrook, CT
Your message board is the second I’ve registered for, I’m in the market for my first fishing kayak.

I live 40:60 Park City UT: Santa Barbara CA. The kayak is going to spend March- September in UT, maybe all the time. But, I will probably have years its brought home to SB.

Im an avid fly fisherman and theres a number of lakes(maybe Green River B section when conditions permit) I would find a kayak to be a great option in UT, WY, etc.. I donÂ’t love tube fishing and some of lakes IÂ’d frequent would benefit from increased water coverage and ability to get home in windy conditions.

IÂ’ve narrowed to Jackson Kayak Mayfly(great setup for fly fishing), native Watercraft propel slayer 10.6(light), Pescador pilot 12.5 ft or OldTown Sportsman 10.6. First has no pedals but very well thought out for fly fishing. But, I like the idea of pedals to stabilize my position more quickly. ItÂ’s going to be fly fishing almost exclusively and while I might do some calm water ocean fishing 80%+ freshwater.

One of the benefits of the Mayfly is its built for fly fishing and the floor is very open for fly line. One of the issues with it is I see the benefits of hands free movement and stabilization with pedals, not an option with it. But thereÂ’s the issue with line,pedal entanglement. Heaviest kayak is the mayfly of my choices, so getting on my lifted Jeep(4-5 inches above stock) is also a concern. Maybe 60-90 lbs range doesnÂ’t make too much difference but some of the easier loading options, Hullvater and the Yakima option have 70 and 80 lb limits so might make the difference.

Love to hear opinions on this and sorry for the length.
I have a Mayfly. I got it because it was designed for fly fishing. It is "earth stable" for standing. It has sufficient storage for all my gadgets. It is NOT designed for any ocean fishing; calm or otherwise. Having said all this, I am probably going to sell it this year and get a Hobie Mirage Outback. I have found the lack of pedals on the MayFly to be a PITA for lake fishing. I spend more time trying to maintain my casting position than fishing even though I added a motor and use an anchor. The flipper type drive won't get caught up in the weeds like the propeller drives will. The Pescador pilot drive is fairly cheap and I've read of issues. I tested one out and did not like it. I also felt the kayak was to narrow and felt unstable when standing. You also might find the the Sportsman to short (although I haven't taken one out). I am not familiar with the Slayer. Just my 2c.
 

mikemac1

Well-known member
Messages
151
Reaction score
171
Location
Bozeman, Montana
I have owned 4 Kayaks and 3 canoes, if I was in the market for another Kayak for still water and mild ocean I would be looking at the Eddyline 14' Caribbean Sit on top. It is a bit pricey but a very nice boat and at 14' long and only 50lbs. The hull is ABS so harder material than many of the other sit on tops which translates in to better speed and control. Read the reviews and it will give you some idea of what to expect. As with fly rods if you can find a place that will rent or let you try the kayaks you are interested in then it will help you make up your mind.

I will second the Eddyline. I have a Caribbean 12 Angler down in Florida for inshore fishing. A great boat—light, fast, easy to carry, and a very stable platform for fly casting while sitting.

Pedal kayaks are great for their maneuverability but have one downside when it comes to fly fishing. Having fished in both Hobies and Native I can tell you that eventually your fly line will get tangled in the props or fins. Once it happens you are now immobile unless you’ve taken along a spare paddle and getting the things untangled while on the water is tedious. They are popular and the gear guys don’t have this issue, but it is a consideration for the fly angler.
 

Jonesdds

Member
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
Location
Park City, UT
I have a Mayfly. I got it because it was designed for fly fishing. It is "earth stable" for standing. It has sufficient storage for all my gadgets. It is NOT designed for any ocean fishing; calm or otherwise. Having said all this, I am probably going to sell it this year and get a Hobie Mirage Outback. I have found the lack of pedals on the MayFly to be a PITA for lake fishing. I spend more time trying to maintain my casting position than fishing even though I added a motor and use an anchor. The flipper type drive won't get caught up in the weeds like the propeller drives will. The Pescador pilot drive is fairly cheap and I've read of issues. I tested one out and did not like it. I also felt the kayak was to narrow and felt unstable when standing. You also might find the the Sportsman to short (although I haven't taken one out). I am not familiar with the Slayer. Just my 2c.
Curious what you mean by added a motor? How did you do that? And I’m a bit surprised it didn’t solve you problem
 

whalensdad

Well-known member
Messages
492
Reaction score
12
Location
Old Saybrook, CT
Curious what you mean by added a motor? How did you do that? And I’m a bit surprised it didn’t solve you problem
There are lots of ways to add a motor. I went with Kevin Dismuke's (You can find it on Google) method. The issue with the motor is that it is hard to maintain a stationary position. It is great for going from one location to the other (which is why I got it), but not much else.
 

Jonesdds

Member
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
Location
Park City, UT
Seems Kevin’s site no longer works but has a Facebook page. Last entry in April was “your site is not working”. Maybe by phone. I’d love to see that setup, it was on the mayfly, right?
 

Jonesdds

Member
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
Location
Park City, UT
Thanks for those. So to left of chair is the controls, hand controls? In my mind I cast, sit, control any drift, then strip. Time to sink anyway. Or, if indicator fishing, just using the motor to keep me steady, or anchor And motor.

Did this fabricator do the install? Curious the range of cost for something like this, if ok to ask. A mayfly with a motor, I’m in. Otherwise, I think I’m going Oldtown sportsman 106 with minn Kota where pedals go(the flush cheaper version). I like it’ll do what the pedals will but the deck is largely snag proof. And affordable and seems very stable given the reviews.

I wonder, too, if pedals can also be placed where motor is, if I so choose to have that option. Anyone know?
 

whalensdad

Well-known member
Messages
492
Reaction score
12
Location
Old Saybrook, CT
Thanks for those. So to left of chair is the controls, hand controls? In my mind I cast, sit, control any drift, then strip. Time to sink anyway. Or, if indicator fishing, just using the motor to keep me steady, or anchor And motor.

Did this fabricator do the install? Curious the range of cost for something like this, if ok to ask. A mayfly with a motor, I’m in. Otherwise, I think I’m going Oldtown sportsman 106 with minn Kota where pedals go(the flush cheaper version). I like it’ll do what the pedals will but the deck is largely snag proof. And affordable and seems very stable given the reviews.

I wonder, too, if pedals can also be placed where motor is, if I so choose to have that option. Anyone know?
1. Yes those are hand controls for the motor (and lighting system).
2. I did the install my self.
3. cost:
a. Kevin Dismuke mounting system - about $275
b. Trolling motor - Depends upon how powerful and brand. I spent $180.
c. Battery - Again it depends upon what size you want. I spent $250
d. Misc - $100
4. The Sportsman with the Motor is $2500. You can get a pedal system for the Old Town. It is $1000.
5. Keep in mind that in most states, having a motor requires you to register the kayak like you would register a car.

This is a rabbit hole. My suggestion is to think about how you would most use the kayak (pedal, motor, or paddle) and stick with it. I bought the Mayfly with one thought in mind and then tried to mold it to do something else. As I said earlier, I plan on selling it to get a Hobie Mirage drive kayak.

Good luck.
 

ArcherA

Well-known member
Messages
71
Reaction score
18
Location
Texas
If you are going to fish pedal, here's a few things to consider. I fish exclusively still water in a Hobie Pro Angler 12', and the lake I fish most has large patches of American Pond Weed, as well as other grassy patches.

For the weed issue, I can drift over the weed beds easily by just holding/pushing the pedals opposite and flattening the paddles against the hull. With a propeller drive, the pond weed would stop me dead cold.

The Hobie also has a retractable skeg in addition to its rudder , allowing 2 modes of driving. Under way, it stabilizes the drift of the ride, which isn't much of any gain to me as it's a bit slower ride. But, for drift fishing, I drop it and it makes the drift very stable in direction and a bit slower.
 

ed from bama

Well-known member
Messages
97
Reaction score
152
Location
south Alabama
Good morning to all-

I have fished from a wide range of kayaks in many situations- and I can tell you a well-mannered kayak is my favorite fishing craft.

I have fly fished from pedal kayaks, and by carefully dropping the loose line into my lap as I fished, i can control the line pretty well. However, I can also promise you that the loose line WILL find the pedal drive from time to time. No big deal UNLESS you've got a good fish hooked, and then it gets to be a big deal really fast.

I just ordered a fishing kayak to replace one of the boats I lost in Hurricane Sally this fall. I can recommend the Perception Pescador Pro 120 very highly.This paddle kayak is light, fast enough, and stable enough for careful standing and fishing. The seat is excellent.

I've got my new 7wt rigged and ready, and the new kayak is supposed to arrive the first week of January. I plan on taking to the nearest bayou to pester some redfish at that time.

good day to all- Ed
 

Jonesdds

Member
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
Location
Park City, UT
Good luck with the Pescador. Can’t beat the price. I’m thinking the rear mounted motor could minimize entanglement except maybe with a large fish on. I guess steering with the motors in that setup but with rudder on the Sportsman. weeds are typically a non issue, these will all be colder water trout lakes that aren’t filled with weeds but could be an issue from time to time.
 

Jonesdds

Member
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
Location
Park City, UT

pulled the trigger on this one. Everything I read points to very good stability and I like the shortness of it for maneuvering and weight to get on Jeep. Also being very open with few snags up front should be very helpful, the pedals were the concern on that for me. And should be good for harbor and protected waters in CA too.

so thinking about accessories. Here’s my list so far. Should be keeping pretty minimal.

Battery-45 lbs thrust motor. Lithium pricey but seems money well spent. 12v 50-60 aH good specs? One site recommended up to 100 aH but was $900. Pricing seemed expensive for that company overall, compared to search on amazon. Recommendations? Total rookie here on these. Realize most kayaks don’t have motors so maybe the wrong forum here.

Rod holders and leashes-Austin Kayak had some Scott options, one with the metal bar securing it and another that was bungee held. I’ve used metal one on boats but it’s not the most secure system. Id want to have two facing rearward and secure well when moving to fishing spots, and one next to me, I’d rig two rods I’d assume most times. Does a crate make sense for fly fishing? Do they make a holder to attach to it? Given length of rods and maybe no rod options, maybe unneeded.

Fish finder-I’d not be going real deep but maybe up to 15 ft, maybe more at times. Another tool I’m not familiar wish. Lake Crowley is a place i might try and seems very useful there. Strawberry in UT is another place. Good beginner option. Kayak seems well set up for this. Does power come from motor battery I assume?

Cup holder, small good cooler for drinks and lunch.

PFD, I’ve got one that should work good, use pockets for some tackle.

paddle. A hook to grab line, even rod seems a good idea if lose handle on rod. I don’t anticipate real shallow water unless shoring it or pushing off so the ones with teeth maybe. Not sure what options exist for securing it on boat but thinking a press in holder, maybe 2 in rear rails a good idea, keeps out of the way. And a tether of course

few good places to secure some fly boxes, other supplies, in addition to vest, got that covered.

charging battery? There will be day trips but also week long camping trips. Camping will almost never if ever involve shore power. Have a teardrop(ish) coming in spring, may get some solar going with it. So generator, can power with that I assume. Battery tender I assume good option connected to that, could Also hook up from inverter in Jeep to charge whenever driving. Any other thoughts?

I thank everybody for their responses.
 
Top