Lake Ontario Atlantic Salmon article

MichaelCPA

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Great read! What a history of development in America, likely similar stories all over the great lakes.

I do see excitement here on the North Shore if anyone lands an Atlantic....it is the equivalent of a Unicorn. But cautious, as stocking happens over top of existing populations (brook, brown, and rainbow/steelhead).

 

huronfly

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I for one am concerned about the existing brook/brown/bow fishery. The tics are stocked on top of smaller resident trout and smolting steelhead... I suspect they will out compete these fish in time IF they even establish themselves, there's been millions stocked over the last decade plus, you'd think we'd see more of them by now if they like the spawning conditions in the tribs.... I personally think the funds could be allocated in a thousand better ways. But that's just my opinion.
 

MichaelCPA

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All true. The tributaries are not as cool nor pure as they were 150 years ago. Pacifics are less fragile, making the run to spawn and die.

A good argument for any stocking program to focus on habitat rehabilitation and barriers removal. Weirdest thing up here is a huge stocking program in the upper Credit (over top of the other fish) and any local guide would say any fish making it to the lake will never return due to the dams. Tough day of trout fishing when there are thousands of 6" Atlantic all over the flies.
 

Ard

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The article is very informative and I'll make it a sticky in Articles and News for discussion.

As part of my charmed existence I did capture several young Atlantic Salmon while fishing the DRS back in 1997 or 98. These fish came as a surprise to me and initially I didn't recognize what I had. It took a minute to get that these were not normal fare for the river. The size was not remarkable and I'd have to guess 1 to 1 1/2 pound fish around 16 to 17 inches.

Reading the article should give any anglers who utilize the fisheries of Lake Ontario reason to be more conservation minded in their handling of captured fish. Perhaps even looking into what one might do to assist in recovery programs.

I didn't live near any of the creeks or rivers addressed in the article but if I did I would have been involved. Just for old time sake heres a story I posted here back in November of 2011 .............. Getting Involved

Here I do whatever I am able to help others understand the value of our fisheries by teaching people how to fish a proper fly and good fish handling habits.
 

lake flyer

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Good article. I was surprised to read that chinooks were first stocked in the late 1800’s.
I just assumed that pacific salmon (excluding steelhead) weren’t stocked before the 1960’s into any of the Great Lakes. I just got finished reading a good book called “The Death and Life of the Great Lakes” by Dan Egan. It addresses the history of invasive species, non native species, and environmental abuses on the Great Lakes.
 

Ard

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A fish can hardly be more beautiful than that! The thing that I find absolutely horrible is when I see one displayed completely out of the water. The sooner that people get over the grip and grin photography of fish the better off this sport will be.
 

drakeking412

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cool read thanks! it's always really exciting when someone lands one that's for sure
 

flytie09

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It’s a great article. While I applaud the effort to try to reintroduce Atlantic Salmon to Lake O tribs.... I simply don’t see them coming back in a sustainable population unless there is significant habitat restoration and spawning ground barriers modifications....ie dam removals or fish ladders. Almost every trib I can think of along Lake O has a dam from big to small. And I’m not sure that would be enough.

The other question I’d ask, is can the Lake support these fish? Or have the changes that have occurred made it unlikely (climate change, forage base, water quality and competition from other invasive species).

I hate to sound all doom and gloom..... but just seems like an expensive and unlikely project that would need tremendous support to have any chance for success.

Im open to hear from a fisheries biologist viewpoint to shed some optimistic light on the subject.

As a sidebar...... I think I caught one this week. If it was one..... it would be my first in over 35 years of fishing up there. Sorry no pic. I thought it was a juvenile Steelhead..... but the spot pattern didn’t look right. Perhaps there is hope.
 
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