Little tricks to share

chechem

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Those stretchy loops (ponytail cuffs) that girls use to tie their ponytails work well to keep line organized on reels. They seem to be on sidewalks all over town.
:D
 

markmark444

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Possibility for small split shot. Buy Mack,s Wax Ear Plug (clear wax oval), push 6-8 shot into the wax, split side up and put in one divider of a fly box and then it take out and put the wax plug in your palm or on top to the fly box to put your leader/tippet thorough and pinch closed. Less dropped shot.
 

Car7x

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I like the ol' redneck system of just 'spinning your male ferrule tip at the crease of your nose, to coat it with the natural oil the accumulates there. Doesn't build up or attract dirt, and works very well to lube rod sections.
 

Car7x

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If you spend enough time in a drift boat, or fishing in general for that matter, you'll soon realize you'd be twice as effective if you could fish with your non - dominant hand. I read a great magazine article on this, can't remember where, that got me started. It's really pretty simple to teach yourself this valuable skill. There are also a couple ways to play with dominant hand presentations in awkward scenarios.

To learn non-dominant hand casting, start on the lawn, just with a scrap of yarn for a fly. Simply get enough line out to load the rod. Don't worry about line management - although, for me, when fishing topwater poppers for smallies and streamers for trout or muskies that was a big challenge - I'd suggest just working the line directly off the reel - no slack - at first.

Start an easy, relaxed false casting cadence with your dominant hand. You aren't hauling, or going for exaggerated velocity, just doing the 10 - 1 on the clockface, with 'high noon' straight up. Pretty much a forearm stroke only.

Relax.

Match the cadence, the stops and starts. When things are going smoothly, work your casting arm over more towards the center of your chest. Place your non-dominant hand on the rod somewhere comfortable. You are going to hand the rod off to the non-dominant hand when you are ready, so be mindful of that. When your two hands are synchronized, drop your dominant hand and keep it going.

Now, you are practicing with the new hand. Assume a proper open stance with your non-dominant side leg behind, approximately 55 - 60% of your weight on it, and foot pointed out from centerline. Your dominant side foot and leg usually will fall naturally to the proper attitude, towards target.
...Stance is key, and often overlooked

Next step is to do the 'pickup and laydown'; just as it sounds, some simple casts, seeing how they feel. Then move through all the steps of the cast sequence:

The unweighted pickup
The smooth and increasing acceleration to a sudden, dead, stop
...Good to look at your backcast here - it should be straight and layout 180 degrees from the target
A micro pause..then smoothly, ideally just before the road loads,
An increasing acceleration forward to a dead stop
Lowering the rod tip in a relaxed follow through

Line management is your next real world challenge, and takes practice, ideally on water.

Best tip I can give is to mind the footwork; when you are casting with your non-dominant hand, you need to reverse your feet, as outlined above. Once your thigh is out of the way, it goes much better. In my case, that took me a couple years to realize ;/. Also, I realized how inept my 'master hand' was at gathering and managing line. I'd suggest first streamers, then poppers - chasing your favorite fish - from a boat for fast and fun practice.

In the boat, 2 other important skills that benefit from continuing work are the backhand presentation, and the chest 'choked' or 'blocked' off-hand cast with the dominant hand. Casting with the dominant arm to the dominant arm side of the boat can be frustrating and even dangerous when in the bow.

Folks will probably do best in the front of the boat with the backhand presentation by turning to face 8 o clock in the boat (bow is 12) to do a backhand presentation river right at 2 o clock. Southpaws reverse this for the river left bank; face 4 o clock and drop the backcast to 10 o clock.. This is great practice for looking at and then addressing backcast issues as well.

Finally, dominant arm to dominant side casting in the bow is an opportunity to practice 'blocking' or 'choking' the pickup with your chest as you raise and stop the rod over your non-dominant shoulder in a diagonal attitude. This is most effective for short, precise casts.

This is safer for your rower/'wheelman' and stern angler if you are the bow angler, and also is a great tactile reinforcer for the feel of a 'dead stop' at the end of your back cast. My chest preventing overtravel or 'creep' of my rod hand gives me a solid 'wall' to let that backcast unfurl.

Play with this stuff and see what you think -
 
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jfh245

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Not really a trick, but I always carry one of those zip-lock bags in my vest for used tippet and trash. Additiionally, discarded mono, food wrappers, plastic caps, littering the banks can be sealed in the baggie without stinking up my vest. Just discard properly and help our streamsides.
 

dennyk

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Just caught myself doing this and thought it's worth sharing. I use Loon UV Clear Fly Finish to seal the wrap and whip finish on most of my flies. I'm a right handed tyer so I put a small drop of UV on my left thumbnail and work off that to put the desired amount on the head with a dubbing needle. The UV will wipe off your thumbnail with a kleenex without a trace. Then hit the UV that's on the fly with your lamp. Much easier then working off the bottle.

***As long as you are not working in sunlight.***

Denny
 

myt1

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Somewhere, I can't find it anywhere, there was a post about a material that you could spray on the inside of your waders to stop small leaks.

I believe it was something you could get at The Home Depot.

I thought I saved the link, but apparently not.

Does anyone know the name of the spray? And does it work?
 

rfong

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Flex Spray, as seen on TV!

Somewhere, I can't find it anywhere, there was a post about a material that you could spray on the inside of your waders to stop small leaks.

I believe it was something you could get at The Home Depot.

I thought I saved the link, but apparently not.

Does anyone know the name of the spray? And does it work?
 

myt1

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Flex Seal rings a bell.

Thanks so much.

I think I read you could use it inside waders, but maybe not.

Thanks again.
 

kevind62

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When wanting to go fishing just tell the spousal unit "I'm going to get supper, have the deep fryer hot and ready when I get home". Just don't forget to stop by WalMart on the way home and pick up a box of IQF catfish fillets. :D
 

geordie41

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Not really a trick as such but I use a small separate fly box to store flies that are wet , I don’t like the idea of putting wet flies straight back into the main box after use.
 

irish1

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Somewhere, I can't find it anywhere, there was a post about a material that you could spray on the inside of your waders to stop small leaks.

I believe it was something you could get at The Home Depot.

I thought I saved the link, but apparently not.

Does anyone know the name of the spray? And does it work?
Have you tried the water proofing spray like would be used on a tent? This can be found at most stores that carry camping gear? I have some and tried it on my 'breathable' waders but have yet to try them out.
 

jfh245

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I always keep a bare, long shank barbless hook in my flybox. A super sharp hook cleans any dried glue or resin out of your fly eye faster than the one on most nippers. It works great on those #16 and smaller hooks. I know I should have noticed it on the vise, but long tying sessions make me stupid...lol.
 

patrick62

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If you fish multiple fly rigs you will inevitably catch two fish at the same time.

When unhooking a double, deal with the bottom fish first. Otherwise you've got a hook swinging around by your hands and arms and clothing with a panicky fish making it all very unpredictable. It is an excellent way to hook yourself. I know. I've done it.
 

jfh245

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After reading your post, I now have a safety pin on my vest. Heck of a lot easier than pulling out my fly box and pulling out a hook. No risk of losing flies or dropping box and much, much faster.

Thanks Brownbass
 
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patrick62

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To prevent your sunglasses from fogging up, soak them in a weak solution of Dawn dishwashing soap and warm water for about 15 minutes. I have no idea why this works but it does. Also it has to be Dawn. I have no idea why but it does.

I'm sure this has been covered in this thread but since the thread is lengthy and because I forgot to do this recenty and spent a lot of time cussing over the resulting fog I thought it worth bringing up again.
 
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Cauer2

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Thanks for the tip. I'll try that. I don't notice for so much while fishing as much as I do while hiking.

Sent from my VS996 using Tapatalk
 
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