Little tricks to share

strmanglr scott

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Read from beginning to end.
Good thread.

I use the rubber large rubber twist ties to hold my rods to my roll bar in my Jeep Wrangler. Up out of the danger and the dog when she's in there.

Found a dining table pad for the leaf of a table. Vinyl on one side, black felt on the other. Place it felt side up at the tying desk and keeps materials in place and most things are easily seen. Can't find a leaf section to a dining table pad? Get a board of desired size for the fly tying desk. Cover one side w a thin layer of foam and felt over that. Put a non slip mat on non felt side. Clean w a lint roller.

Always keep a complete set of clothes for back up in case unintentional swimming takes place when wading. Done that once, glad I had the change of clothes.

For tying a dropper or just a fly on, I always face across stream and let my line belly down current and put tension on the line. I have my hemostats on a zip line connected to my vest. Many times I'll put my rod under my armpit, clamp my hemos to the very end of the tippet and then just let my hemos hang freely, now I have two hands free to do whatever, easier to unzip a pocket and get a fly and zip a pocket back up that way.
 

patrick62

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Whenever you find a doodad that works really well, buy five of them. Otherwise you will go to replace the doodad and find it has been made "new and improved," a phrase that always irritates me. What was I using before -- "old and lousy"?

Or the item is not to be found.

Case in point. Some 15 years ago, at the hardware store, I spied a nifty little set of needlenose pliers among the impulse buys on the counter. Absolutely perfect for flattening barbs on hooks, and small enough to fit in any vest, bag, or pack.

I think they were $1.49.

I hung onto them for 15 years, a personal record. But alas they are lost, and the hardware store cannot find anything similar.

I switched to a Gerber mini-tool, which does the job. And after I decided it would do, I bought five of them.
 

Bird

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Rule Of Rods:
Last out, first in. Always.

"Last Out" means:
When you are starting to fish, leave your rod in its case in your vehicle until you've got everything else totally ready to fish (waders on, vest or pack on, hat on; everything). If you take your rod out beforehand, you run the risk of it falling over or getting crushed in a door or stepped on.

"First In" means when you return to your vehicle after fishing, the first thing to go back into your vehicle is your rod into its case. Never just leave it propped up against something, or somewhere it might be forgotten, while you're messing around with all your other stuff.
 

jpbfly

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I haven't posted here for a while.....a little trick to protect your mobile while fishing,a lttle plastic zipbag for deepfrozen food,you can use your phone without taking it out except to take pics.:)it'll save your phone if you ever have a little bath which happens at times:eek::D:D:D
Photo2167.jpg
 

karstopo

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I haven't posted here for a while.....a little trick to protect your mobile while fishing,a lttle plastic zipbag for deepfrozen food,you can use your phone without taking it out except to take pics.:)it'll save your phone if you ever have a little bath which happens at times:eek::D:D:D
View attachment 18523
I also include a paper towel in the zip bag to catch any extra water on my fingers that might get transferred to the device. Just a few drops of water rolling around in sealed zip bag along with the phone can cause bad outcomes for the phone, at least without something to soak up the water.
 

Flypops

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I just finished reading through this entire thread, over the past few days, and I will say it is well worth the time. Some of the tips and tricks are pretty clever and I've already put a couple in place. One of the frustrating elements of an old internet thread is the dreaded Photobucket blur. The first few years of the thread photos are all affected, but regardless, the point of the posts for the most part is still intact.

I didn't actually count but I think the clear winner, being the most posted tip, was/is the rubber band guitar string pluck for removing excess moisture from a dry fly. There had to be at least 8 posts for that one. Second place I think goes to tips on tying on tippet rings, although every tippet ring I've ever purchased came on a larger ring or swivel so there has always been something to hold onto as you thread and knot the top ring onto your leader. But were you to end up with a bunch of loose tippet rings then you definitely need a way to hold them in place to thread and tie.

Okay, now in an effort to keep this thread alive, I have a few tips I've stumbled on over the years, none are my origination.

1. Use a pair of hemostats clipped on to your bottom fly to find the exact depth of water when still water fishing with an indicator from a boat, tube or 'toon. You can precisely set your indicator for proper depth control of your presentation. If you are concerned about losing your hemostats to structure on the bottom you can use a stationery binder clip instead. They are cheaper, but I try and only clip tools to my vest that have multiple purposes, and except for the tying bench I can't think of another purpose on the water for a binder clip, but maybe...........

2. I like to carry my rods in the back of my pickup cab while in a combo rod/reel case. However I used to completely breakdown my rigs so there were no hooks or other tackle on the leader. I've found that using a piece of foam, approximately 1/2" x 2" x 2" I can wrap the leader with tippet and flies, split shot and indicator around the foam and tuck it into the case without worry of it snagging or getting tangled. It saves me 15 or 20 minutes at lake/stream side by not having to re-rig 2 rods every morning.

3. Years ago a fellow fly fisherman shared this tip with me and I still have this gadget attached to my vest today. He would take old roll film cases and cut a couple of windows in the sides, then glue a small piece of window screen on the inside of the case to cover the windows. These allow terrific ventilation to quickly dry out any take-off flies yet there is no chance of losing them like we all do when using foam or fleece patches. We've all stuck a fly into a piece of foam only to look for it later and it's nowhere to be found. What he did was put a couple of holes in the film case cap and run a short piece of dacron backing thru the cap. Then you can simply clip this as a lanyard to one of your zingers. At the end of the day you can see all the flies that didn't work that day but they are dry and ready to be put back in their fly box. The problem with this is that finding old film cases is getting harder all the time. ;)

This is truly one of the most informative threads I've found on any forum. Hopefully it can keep going as I for one know that in the sport of angling and fly-fishing in particular, we never stop learning.

Thanks to all who have contributed.

Dan
 

redietz

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3. Years ago a fellow fly fisherman shared this tip with me and I still have this gadget attached to my vest today. He would take old roll film cases and cut a couple of windows in the sides, then glue a small piece of window screen on the inside of the case to cover the windows. These allow terrific ventilation to quickly dry out any take-off flies yet there is no chance of losing them like we all do when using foam or fleece patches. ...The problem with this is that finding old film cases is getting harder all the time. ;)
You can always use a prescription bottle instead of film canister. Not as easy to cut the windows into though. Or you can do what I do. I've got an old plastic Sucrets box (they've unfortunately long since gone back to metal) into the the lid of which I've drilled 12 hole with a 1/16 bit. It stays in a ventilated inner pocket in my vest. Flies I've changed streamside are always dry by the time I get back to the car at the end of the day. Any similar sized plastic box will work.
 

jfh245

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If you are saddled with a UV lamp that just takes to long to cure your resin leaving it tacky and wet, clip your hackle pliers or a small heatsink to the fly's eyelet, remove from your vise and lay it on the table with the light laying down in front to complete curing. Frees up the vise to tie some more and you don't sit there lamp in hand forever. Better yet, contact silver creek, he has a great lamp and resin.
 

baconcrusader

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I use the address labels Trout Unlimited sends you, in their "Join Us" recruitment junk mail, to put my name and address inside my fly boxes. Cover with a piece of Scotch tape, and it's a fairly waterprooof LEGIBLE solution.

Great thread BTW!
 

spm

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I use the address labels Trout Unlimited sends you, in their "Join Us" recruitment junk mail, to put my name and address inside my fly boxes. Cover with a piece of Scotch tape, and it's a fairly waterprooof LEGIBLE solution.

Great thread BTW!
Good idea. You can also paint them with Sally Hansen to waterproof them.

s.
 

chechem

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I deep-water nymph in lakes, and have for years.

This summer I learned the value of PURPLE. Yes, I tied some purple Callibaetis nymphs and found them very successful in Hebgen Lake. Old dog, new tricks. Give it a try. I don't have a pic of my nymph, but use purple Pheasant-Tail Nymphs by Umpqua as a guide.
 

sweetandsalt

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You know those clear plastic, zippered cases that new sheets and pillowcases for example come in? Usually they have an interior window in which is inserted a cardboard label with the product name and size on it.

I use these to assemble leader tying kits containing the build spools and spare tippet spools along with an extra nipper, already built, braided or furled leaders and what not. I reverse the cardboard label and write "Trout Leader Kit" or "Fluorocarbon Saltwater Leader Kit" on it. Also good for spare/back-up fly lines on a trip. They are clear to view contents, adequately flexible to compress in a travel duffle and help keep the less neat among us organized. A complete or compact leader tying kit accompanies me on every trip.
 

cooutlaw

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For many years I struggled with a good location for my thermometer, usually it ended up dangling somewhere on me clipped to a vest or pack. Then dipping the thermometer and waiting for an accurate reading was always a time suck. A Division of Wildlife biologist showed me their common practice to save time and hassle - I've used it ever since.

river_oracle_fly_fishing_thermometer__98449.1518111592.380.507.jpg
 
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