Little tricks to share

jfh245

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Prefer tying my own leaders but never liked tying in-store purchased bi-color indicator before tippet ring because of the larger diameter on nymphing set-ups. Just dye and then magic mark the last length before tippet ring and adjust tippet to length. I save old tippet spools and wrap pre-built leaders for different set-ups on them before heading out. I'll carry a 14' dry, 8' small stream, 20' French nymph and a 10' nymph. Just wrap the one coming off on an empty and the new peels off a loaded spool. 4 loaded spools and one empty in a vest pocket.
 

patrick62

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Using squirmy worms for brookies I have found the little guys can't get their mouths open wide enough for the whole thing. So I yank off the back half of the squirmy part, over the hook.
 

karstopo

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Stuck rod sections, try running cold water over the connection for a minute. Worked for me today, twice, spigot and “normal” ferrules with rods that I normally leave connected all of the time. Prior to trying the cold water treatment, I tugged at the section for all I had and couldn’t budge them.
 

First Light

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Stuck rod sections, try running cold water over the connection for a minute. Worked for me today, twice, spigot and “normal” ferrules with rods that I normally leave connected all of the time. Prior to trying the cold water treatment, I tugged at the section for all I had and couldn’t budge them.
When I put a rod together I put the male ends of the rod beside my nose and rotate it around. This area of your face alongside your nose is the oilest place on your face and adding a little of your face oil to the male ferrule before you put the rod sections together will allow for easier disassembly when you are ready to take the rod apart. Lefty taught me that years ago.
 

karstopo

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When I put a rod together I put the male ends of the rod beside my nose and rotate it around. This area of your face alongside your nose is the oilest place on your face and adding a little of your face oil to the male ferrule before you put the rod sections together will allow for easier disassembly when you are ready to take the rod apart. Lefty taught me that years ago.
I use the face oil trick. But, I leave some of my rods together for many months at a time and almost never break them down for travel. I went out on a recent trip where I wanted to break down a rod that had been together for more than a year for travel and, naturally, it was reluctant to come apart. I thought about that most materials shrink a tiny amount when cold so tried that cure and it worked.

Yea, I know I’m supposed to break down rods between outings, but I live on the water so a session on the water is but a few steps away. How silly would it be to break down a rod after every little session, sometimes 2 or three times a day, and waste that time putting it back together each time?
 

karstopo

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Karstopo, why not just own one piece rods?
Not a lot of those around, really. Not nearly the selection, anyhow. What’s the breakdown on one piece versus multi piece rods? One one piece fly rod for every 20 multi piece fly rods? I thought about getting a one piece a while back, but those mainly seem to be in the way high end category. Something like a Scott Meridian (now discontinued, about 5 years after its introduction ), the NRX (now, new and improved), etc. Those are not anything I even remotely need or want for 50’ casts to redfish or LMB. About any old rod will work. As an example, a local guy is using a random, cheap 2 weight on oversized redfish and destroying them (hopefully, not literally).

So far, I haven’t had a rod that wouldn’t come apart after being together for a long period. Every once in a while, I like the option of taking a rod apart and going somewhere.
 

dennyk

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As a newbie fly tier, I have been watching a ton of tying videos. One tool that caught my attention - a brass handled, razor tip thread cutter. Can't find one anywhere, but I did find this

NEW FLY TYING TOOL “CHISEL BLADE” (DIY) - Fly Tying Forum - SurfTalk

I made one last night...not nearly as pretty, but it works.
Hi bigal! Here's another option for you made by Loon. This is what I use and I did need to refine the chisel point just a bit. Works Great!

Ergo Whip Finisher | Loon Outdoors

Denny
 

tcorfey

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Here is something you can try if you are curious about rod/reel balance.
(I posted this on a thread about rod/reel balance but thought I would add it to the tips section too.)
- Let's say you have a 5wt rod and you have a reel that weighs enough to balance it.
Line the rod with your favorite line and get 30-40 feet of line out. Now stick the reel in your pocket.
Try casting with just the line and no reel. See how it feels.
Then leaving the line through the guides mount a heavy reel on perhaps one from a 8wt rod. Cast that and see how it feels.
Now place your original reel back on the rod and cast it, how does that feel.
Swap different weight reels around as much as you want until you are satisfied which reel weight feels the best to you.
Check the rod/reel balance.
That should tell you if balance does not matter to you or if there is a sweet spot in reel weight that feels best to you.
One other thing to pay attention to is your grip, if a particular reel weight causes you to grip the rod tighter than that will affect your casting.

Try it and see.

Note: It would be best to have a target to cast to because accuracy at 30'-40' gives you something to focus on and compare against.

Regards,

Tim C.
 

Druunkonego

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When I'm watching a fly tying tutorial, I'm always surprised when I see people bust out their whip finishing tool.
I've never owned one.
The only time I ever used one was when I took a fly fishing class at Penn State for a gym credit and I can't help but view it as a bit of over engineering. Almost wholly unnecessary. Now I'm sure there are some out there that would jump at the opportunity to argue this with on me... fine. To each their own. I'd bet you could make an argument for why it's the perfect tool for the job (tying flies with antennae comes to mind). Not for me. My tool of choice is the simple bodkin (or my hand if the situation calls for it, but that method seems to be well documented). But I'm not sure I've ever seen anyone do the bodkin method. It's not hard. I can't help but wonder why it's not used more often. It's not ground breaking and I'm sure many of you do it already but if it helps someone, I'll be happy I shared it. Anyway, here's the trick.

YouTube

edit: I misspoke in the video. Meant to say "I could fake a whip finish..."
 
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patrick62

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Keep an emergency kit handy. Not first aid stuff, but things like extra split shot. Ziplock bags. Duct tape. Velcro. That hemostat you didn't like but works better than none at all. Bungy cords. Batteries. Extra flashlight.

And here is what you keep this stuff in:



The ones I use come from JR Cigars and contain 91 La Fincas.
 

LOC

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When I'm watching a fly tying tutorial, I'm always surprised when I see people bust out their whip finishing tool.
I've never owned one.
The only time I ever used one was when I took a fly fishing class at Penn State for a gym credit and I can't help but view it as a bit of over engineering. Almost wholly unnecessary. Now I'm sure there are some out there that would jump at the opportunity to argue this with on me... fine. To each their own. I'd bet you could make an argument for why it's the perfect tool for the job (tying flies with antennae comes to mind). Not for me. My tool of choice is the simple bodkin (or my hand if the situation calls for it, but that method seems to be well documented). But I'm not sure I've ever seen anyone do the bodkin method. It's not hard. I can't help but wonder why it's not used more often. It's not ground breaking and I'm sure many of you do it already but if it helps someone, I'll be happy I shared it. Anyway, here's the trick.

YouTube

edit: I misspoke in the video. Meant to say "I could fake a whip finish..."
I started the same way. I'm self taught and I learned how to whip finish by hand and had no idea there was a tool for it. lol I finally saw a buddy tie a fly and he used a whip finish tool. Funny because I've seen them at the fly shop and I was like "Ah ha that's what that's for". So he showed me how to use it and I was hooked. For me there's something about the ergonomics that is very satisfying laying down a perfect knot using a whip finishing tool. It has nothing to do with speed or convenience. I can finish a fly with or without the tool. What makes fly fishing so unique compared to other forms of angling is that it is about the process rather then the simplest or easiest path to catching a fish and for myself that extends over to fly tying. It's like when you ask someone if they tie and their answer is, "No I'd rather spend my time on catching fish". For us who tie we would rather spend some of that "fish catching time" in the process...

Thanks for the video. I will try the bodkin method on my next fly.
 
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jrp11948

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Thats a great one. Had the same situation in upState New York last fall. Went home and put a bag of frozen peas on the stuck spot for about 5 minutes. Came right apart.
Don't know where the sell frozen peas on the river!!
 

bigspencer

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I've got one. When you've snagged your fly on a log, rock, root.... ect that is above the water, and are unable to get to it do to depth or speed of water or cause your floating past it down the river what do you do? Most times people just snap it off and tie on a new fly. Next time this happens to you try this, Raise your straight up keeping the line tight and then roll cast above and past the object you are snagged on. After your line goes over the object make a quick backcast. About half the time your fly pops free and the fishing continues. I use this technique alot with clients as well as for myself. Also never use this method when snagged in a bush or tree, you'll end up with a bunch of line tangled in the branches.
*A little addendum to Davo's useful tip. Make your roll cast loop a tight and forceful one and get it to travel directly over your fly, as close to the fly as you can without adding a tangled leader to the problem. Remember there will be a slight upward pull from the leader because of the shape of a loop. That way the leader will then be pulling, generally, in a backward direction...without much horizontal pull.....applying most of the pull energy..a directly backward one...to the hook's barb area..instead of a pull or multiple roll-cast pulls off in different directions...adding to the problem...
Hope it helps someday...
 

patrick62

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Lost in the furor over COVID-19 is the ever-present danger of ticks and tick-borne diseases. I've had Lyme once and erlichiosis twice and I don't recommend the experience. I gave up charging around in shorts years ago, and now that it is warm I will be wet wading in long nylon pants and technical fishing shirts.

I treat the hell out of all my outdoor clothing with permethrin, which is readily available in handy spray bottles. This is a lot less expensive than buying pre-treated clothing, and you can reup the dosage whenever you want. I do it two or three times per season, which is probably overkill -- but it's better than getting sick.

I also have three days' worth of doxycycline on hand. When the symptoms start, you want to zap it right away. I waited three days the first time, thinking I just had a bad cold, and spent the next three weeks in utter misery. Most doctors are on board with this. If it turns out you don't have a tick disease the worst that can happen is an upset stomach and maybe a sunburn (doxycycline greatly increases sensitivity to sun).
 
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