Little tricks to share

LePetomane

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When I put a rod together I put the male ends of the rod beside my nose and rotate it around. This area of your face alongside your nose is the oilest place on your face and adding a little of your face oil to the male ferrule before you put the rod sections together will allow for easier disassembly when you are ready to take the rod apart. Lefty taught me that years ago.
Maybe on graphite or fiberglass but you don't want to do that on metal ferrules. Any residual will cause corrosion over time. Plain candle wax (paraffin) will work just as well without potential harm to the rod.
 
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original cormorant

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Inspired by the topic of rod assembly I note that most anglers don't adopt the best sequence fo this.
With a typical 4 piece rod first attach the reel to the butt section, then assemble the top three sections and then attach butt section.
This means you aren't waving the entire rod about as you attach the reel and also (if there are no allignment marks) that you can see the reel is in line with the rings.
 

Hayden Creek

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I learned this trick from one of the great climbers of my generation back in the 80's. I was going to Alaska to tackle a couple of big peaks for the first time. Ran into Charlie at a local cliff. He had tons of experience in the alpine so I asked him for some advice.
"Never pass up an opportunity to pee" was all he said.
 

LePetomane

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A little gem that I use every time I fish is that when I arrive at the stream I put my waders on first. The last thing I do before I leave the car is assemble my rod. When I arrive at the car after fishing I immediately take my rod apart and place it in the tube. These sequences minimize the time your rod is exposed to open car doors and breakage.

Who can guess the leading cause of bamboo rod breakage? Hint: It is not a car door.
 

Hayden Creek

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I
A little gem that I use every time I fish is that when I arrive at the stream I put my waders on first. The last thing I do before I leave the car is assemble my rod. When I arrive at the car after fishing I immediately take my rod apart and place it in the tube. These sequences minimize the time your rod is exposed to open car doors and breakage.

Who can guess the leading cause of bamboo rod breakage? Hint: It is not a car door.
I do the same. Rod is last out of the truck when I arrive and first in upon returning.
Can't answer your question but would love to know the answer.
 

LePetomane

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"Never pass up an opportunity to pee" was all he said.
That should be the last thing you do before pulling up your waders.

Another tip, when preparing dubbing for dry flies, less is more. Start with a little and add. It is easier to add than it is to subtract.
 
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maya814

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Encouraged by Hardyreels to do it,I’ve decided to start a new thread to share some of my tricks with you ,maybe most of them will help beginners ,maybe some of you will find a good idea to solve a little problem…before I start don’t blame me if my explanations are not always as clear as you expected for French is my native tongue.
1 You’ve got a rod whose ferule is worn out or your tip or a piece of your 4 or3p rod which works loose or goes off when you fish.Just take a candle and rub your rod with it,easy,cheap and it works as well on carbon and metal.
to be continued….if you find that useful:)
thanks for the tips!
 

flafly14

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Here's a simple tip that has really helped me. I was getting readyi for my first day of real tarpon fishing. I was at my buddy's house working on my casting, when he said "ok now let's work on your strip sets". So I would cast toward him, he would grab the line, I would close my eyes and start stripping in the fly like a regular retrieve, then he would give the line a tug like a fish ate. Then it was my job to do a proper hookset. Amazing! Why had I never thought of practicing that before?! Anyway, if you're gonna do a SW trip, or if you have trouble with your hooksets, you might try practicing like that.
 

DCFlyfishfamily

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dave whitlock taught me this 1, so i don't want to take credit:

it's sort of hard to explain without demonstrating though. say you're casting against a bank or up to a bush or tree that is emerging from or overhanging the water and you overshoot a bit and your fly hangs a limb, but the line doesn't wrap around it a bunch of times...it's pretty much just dangling there. this happens quite a bit actually...especially when casting poppers, dries, hoppers, etc. near the bank.

do not yank! relax, and retrieve the fly line as slowly as possible until the fly simply scoots over the limb and plops into the water below. it works about 9 out of 10 times. oh...and be ready for a strike. it's a very realistic presentation when imitating terrestrials!
[/QUOT

I'm new to fly fishing and this should be taught to everyone! In fact RELAX in general is a good tip!
 

DCFlyfishfamily

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Here is a little trick I use. Get 1 or 2 wine corks and drill a hole through the center long ways. Run an old shoe string through the hole and tie a knot on one end and leave enough shoe string on the other end to make a loop. You slide the shoe string through a D ring on your vest and loop cork through the loop of the shoe sting so it hangs down.

You can put your flies into the cork to dry when you chang flies or if you are tying on a dropper fly you can hook your dropper fly in the cork while you tie on your tippet.

I will post some pix to show everyone. This is a very cheap trick!!!!!

Jr
One of the challenges in general is where to put stuff while out on the water. Having been given most of my gear its generally older stuff that doesn't have easy to access pockets. Thank you for this one!
 

kkooch

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So, when out on the water in waders and you want to change a fly, do most put the rod/reel in the water to free up your hands to change a fly or where do you place the rod/reel? Or do you seek dryer ground? Someone mentioned stuffing in your waders- this seemed like a good idea, but it's not very practical. I have new Orvis waders and there is just not that much room to be stuffing a rod/reel down a pant leg.

Thanks,

Kevin Kuczek
 

Ard

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I've been clamping my rods under me right arm pit for over 50 years now. I've had vests with rod holder loops and velcro catches to secure then while tying knots but the under the arm thing works with little ado, even with 14 foot Spey rods. I've never put a rod in my waders..............
 

rusty 54

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I've been clamping my rods under me right arm pit for over 50 years now. I've had vests with rod holder loops and velcro catches to secure then while tying knots but the under the arm thing works with little ado, even with 14 foot Spey rods. I've never put a rod in my waders..............
Not nearly for 50 years and I clamp with my left arm, but, yep.
 

redietz

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Closer to 60 years for me.

I remember seeing a photo a long time ago of an angler with a rod clamped under the arm captioned "The classic 'changing a fly' pose." Not sure that I'd call it a "pose", but it's certainly the classic way change a fly.
 

duker

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Never worn a vest; always clamp my rod under my left arm, kinda hooked in my elbow, to change flies or tippet or check knots. Keeps both hands free to get fly boxes or tippet out of my wader pocket or grab my nippers. I've never liked putting the end of my rod down to change flies, wherever I'm standing.

Had no idea that was a "classic" pose but now I'm going to make the most of it.
 
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