Long fly lines - What do/would you do?

swfl daz

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I'm spooling up a new reel and have 150 yards of backing per the manufacturer's spec. With the backing evenly (and tightly) spooled, the reel won't hold my new 105' Airflo line.

So, do you take off 20 or 30 yards of backing or cut off 15' of the running line? My initial thought was to just take backing off, but do I want to give up 30 yards for 15', especially if/when I change lines in the future? What's the benefit (if any) of a 105' fly line over a 90' if the only difference is in the length of the running portion? Note - This is a 7wt that is going to see salt and brackish use and I will be getting into the backing from time to time.

Thoughts/opinions?

Thanks
 
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jayr

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AirFlo lines are thicker than other makers lines I have discovered. The weights correspond, but the line is thicker and takes up more space on the reel meaning less backing.
 

swfl daz

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300' deep into the backing?
Good point. I have had good bonefish run pretty deep into it before, but that said, this probably won't see many bones - It's going to be more of a snook and juvenile tarpon setup so probably not.

What's the point/benefit though of 105' of fly line over just 90? I have a decent cast but I don't throw 100', I'd guess that most of my fishing with this rod will be in the 60-70' range.
 
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trev

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What's the point/benefit though of 105' of fly line over just 90?
I really don't know, I'm a fresh water feller; but it occurs to me that there must be a reason, perhaps that 15' often makes the difference between being in the backing or not?
I have always wondered "why not just cut all the running line off a WF and tie the backing to the head?"
I use DT lines just so I don't have that quandary.
 

WNCtroutstalker

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Another vote for cutting the line back. Especially since you say you can't cast the whole line--not being critical (I don't think I could even cast a whole 90' line), but something you say you don't need is taking up space. Even if it's unlikely you'd need that extra backing, I'd rather fill the spool with that than line that will never be cast.
 

mtboiler

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Do both. 150 yards of backing is 450 feet!! 100 yards is plenty, that is 300 ft! IF you are 300 ft away on a 7wt, you probably should have had an 8 or 9wt.
Second, if you cannot cast 100 ft, cut it back a bit. I typically only put 90ft.
My opinion is I want about a 1/4 inch minimum between the fly line and the cross brackets on the reel. That means I try to put my fly line 3/8 of an inch away when it is perfectly spooled. When fighting a fish it never goes on smoothly, so you have an 1/8 of an inch to play with. Not much but enough to not damage your line.
 

LOC

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Flip a coin lol. For the most part you can do either or....
That said, it will be far easier to making a backing loop then having to make a new loop in the fly line.
 
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flav

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I've done both, but in this instance I'd choose to cut back the line without any hesitation.
 

original cormorant

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I'm spooling up a new reel and have 150 yards of backing per the manufacturer's spec. With the backing evenly (and tightly) spooled, the reel won't hold my new 105' Airflo line.

So, do you take off 20 or 30 yards of backing or cut off 15' of the running line? My initial thought was to just take backing off, but do I want to give up 30 yards for 15', especially if/when I change lines in the future? What's the benefit (if any) of a 105' fly line over a 90' if the only difference is in the length of the running portion? Note - This is a 7wt that is going to see salt and brackish use and I will be getting into the backing from time to time.

Thoughts/opinions?

Thanks
So if it's a new reel perhaps you should swap it for the next size up.
 

VaFisherman

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Cut the line back to 90ft. Even if the once every few years the gods, wind and timing allow a 100ft cast there is no reason you cannot shoot backing just as well as running line.
 

LOC

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Cut the line back to 90ft. Even if the once every few years the gods, wind and timing allow a 100ft cast there is no reason you cannot shoot backing just as well as running line.

Just be mindful (casting past the end of your fly line) that it's really easy to get knots in your backing when it's loose outside your reel.
You need to be careful how you flake out your backing whether on the ground, in the water or the deck of a boat.
 

hatidua

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Silly questions on my part: A)what kind of backing? B)Is the reel actually big enough for the rod/line/backing? Some reels state that they are a specific size and yet the Brand X "7wt" reel is more suited to filling with 5wt line/backing...

The infatuation with manufacturers trying to compete on specified reel weight alone seems to have ushered in an era of reels that are often too small for their stated line rating.
 

swfl daz

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Silly questions on my part: A)what kind of backing? B)Is the reel actually big enough for the rod/line/backing? Some reels state that they are a specific size and yet the Brand X "7wt" reel is more suited to filling with 5wt line/backing...

The infatuation with manufacturers trying to compete on specified reel weight alone seems to have ushered in an era of reels that are often too small for their stated line rating.
A. 20# Dacron
B. Manufacturer's Spec. says " 7,8 rod wt, WF7 line, 150 yds 20#"

Since I posted the original question, I have had a change of plans - I decided to put this reel (Lamson Guru II) on a different rod and am selling the Sage 3280 reel that I had on it.

I'm now looking for a new reel to replace the Lamson.
 

Uncle Stu

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Even though your plan has changed, I would have cut the backing for a couple reasons. One already stated: the backing lines tangles super easy if its off the reel, and someday you MIGHT cast all of your line. Also, your line is expensive and can be traded or sold later on if you wish, or you might want to use that line for something different later (running line for a spey setup?) so keep it intact. And here's a tip I learned the hard way: always load backing and line in reverse at first, so you know exactly how much backing you need. Ie, spool on the fly line first, connect the backing, and wind it on top of the fly line until full. Then remove it all and respool with backing first. It's worth the extra time it takes to have it come out perfectly.

BTW--good move on choosing Airflo line. Relatively durable and a good value overall.
 

hatidua

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Although it sounds like plans have changed, I went to the Lamson site to look at the specs for that reel: it weighs 5oz, for a 7wt. That would make for an extremely tip-heavy rig (I have a 5oz reel on a Asquith 4wt!).

Unless you have a real love affair with Dacron, you might consider braid as backing. Stronger, thinner, doesn't mildew, lasts essentially forever if used as fly line backing.

Good luck on your quest (and bumping the reel size/weight up a few ounces will only make things more pleasant as you stand around between casts).
 

dynaflow

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As a salt water only fly fisher I generally avoid Airflo lines,as despite their attributes they're too fat and I don't like sacrificing backing.Of my sixteen fly lines only one is an Airflo.I'm wondering why you need a 105 foot fly line?
 

swfl daz

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As a salt water only fly fisher I generally avoid Airflo lines,as despite their attributes they're too fat and I don't like sacrificing backing.Of my sixteen fly lines only one is an Airflo.I'm wondering why you need a 105 foot fly line?
Short answer - I don't, and that's why it may still end up getting cut - It all depends on what reel I end up with for this rig (it's a rod that I'm still waiting on the build so there's no big rush on the reel) - I just found a couple of deals and figured it'd work, but like I said above, plans have changed. I bought the line discounted, online, and the description said 90' so I when I saw it was actually 105', I wasn't terribly surprised that it didn't all fit on the reel with the backing spooled to spec.

I do know what you're saying about some AirFlo lines being fat. I used to throw an 11wt Tropical Sniper line that was 120' long and had a huge thick and heavy head. I had it on one of the original TFO Axioms and that pairing would shoot line like out of a cannon. Not much of a presentation line but it would punch through the wind, and for rolling tarpon in moving water where a bit of a splash was not an issue, it was perfect. I think I still have a couple of their others on a reel or two, but these days most of my lines are SA with a Rio here and there as well.
 
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