Mayfly Numbers drop in Half

okaloosa

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Might as well take up golf boys!!!


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probably all the pesticides and herbicides used on golf courses contributing to the decline in mayflies...please play putt-putt instead. ;)
 

trev

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Locally many golf courses are located right on streams and when they were first constructed and became popular the streams changed almost over night, apparently most of the fertilizer they applied washed straight into the creeks when they irrigated.
 

scotty macfly

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My friends in the UK say that they have the same issues with the bug life being not as good as it has in the past. And with all the farm land going right up to the banks of their rivers, the pesticides are being washed into the water ways and having a negative effect.

We have a reservoir here outside of Longmont called Lagerman, and for the first two years the fishing was fantastic. Then for many years the fishing just went down hill, though they were stocking the reservoir, the fish just didn't want to play along.

Here's the thing; the inlet water to the reservoir was running through a turkey farm, and what they were doing with the turkey dropping was throwing it into the creek and it eventually ended up into the res. How we found this out was, when the turkey plant in Longmont closed, the turkey farm, like many in this area closed down. No more turkey poo.
Fishing the res. now is much better than it has been in years, and the water even looks better. Coincidence?

As for alligator penises, can we use a different term? That just doesn't sound good. Can we refer to that subject as gator sausages?
 

dr d

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hi,


in addition to all good reasons above there is the significant reduction of surface tension due to phosphats/nitrats.

the hatch is more difficult in such a weak surface>>a)turbo hatch in short time or b)a lot of emergents which will

be eaten subsurface.the investigations were done by switzerland,england and some benulux fishermen imho.

as long as this pollution together with the pharmaceutical and agriculture will not be reduced>>>nothing will change to better.


thomas
 

jpbfly

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hi,


in addition to all good reasons above there is the significant reduction of surface tension due to phosphats/nitrats.

the hatch is more difficult in such a weak surface>>a)turbo hatch in short time or b)a lot of emergents which will

be eaten subsurface.the investigations were done by switzerland,england and some benulux fishermen imho.

as long as this pollution together with the pharmaceutical and agriculture will not be reduced>>>nothing will change to better.


thomas
You're right....reduced by half ,in a way you're lucky ,here in some areas it's less 80% or even 90%.Frightening!!!
 

smilingduck

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Well the good news is soon we won’t have to worry about mayflies at all. We will all be using trout pellet flies....


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Bigfly

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We need the human population to drop in half.......but that's what a virus is for.
There are actually people out the who would prefer fishing pellets.....anything to make fishing easier.

Jim
 

sweetandsalt

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I don't think our new virus can differentiate between the people who want it easy and the dedicated few, Bigfly.
 

bumble54

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Mayfly numbers here in the UK are a mere shadow of what they were. I don't know if anyone truly knows the actual cause or maybe it's a number of factors that together have caused the decline. The blame can't be laid solely at pesticides because waters I fished with huge mayfly hatches have never been subject to agricultural spraying, nor has the watershed they flow through and yet the mayfly have all but disappeared.
On thing I have noticed is that the sparse hatches that do still occur have been more erratic and are now are spread over many months, I have seen Ephemera Vulgata hatch from May to September, and in the daytime, rather than the mass hatches of old, in June and July, which occured in late afternoon and evenings, when finding mate would be more certain. With so few flies around at any one time predation of only a few must make a big difference. Maybe the changing climate is having an adverse affect as it seems to be changing faster than the flies can adapt.
It is over 40 years since I saw a hatch of Danica that was so dense that it was that is was only with some difficulty that I could actually make out the far bank of the river, and that was not a big river by any means.
Strangely though the smaller species of dayflies in my pond have been doing quite well despite the rather heavy fish population.
 

sweetandsalt

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I'm certain it is an accumulation of factors including deleterious effluent and habitat destructon but I suspect it is largely the warming of our World and the water on it that is depleting Mayflies and many other sensitive, slow to adapt lifeforms. I'm an angler hence an optimist but you don't have to be a weatherman to know which way the wind blows.
 

Bent Undergrowth

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I happened upon a correspondence today from some toxicologists out of Ontario regarding the decline in Ephemera guttulata on the Credit River.

They indicated there is evidence of sediment oxygen demand problems playing a primary role in the decline. Not surprising.

It also sounds like they are working towards developing toxicity tests for this organism, which is very promising from my perspective.

The truth is that this is just one of many underrepresented organisms in one of many complex ecosystems we’ve systematically sought to oversimplify because we *thought* we knew everything... but I can tell you that the science is getting exponentially better every day. It’s policy and public perception that lags behind. We all need to be better communicators and listeners.
 

higby5

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I lived on a grass flat in Florida for 16 winters. When I first moved there it was a beautiful healthy bay ,filled with wonderful sea grass. I had the great pleasure of wading out on an incoming tide, and tossing streamers to tailing Redfish, by the time the water reached my knees, I would wander off to the mangroves and fish for Snook. As the years wore on, the grass eventually became buried in algae, which fed on chemical runoff from all the development talking place in the area. The Reds no longer came in to nose around in the grass, and sight fishing for tailing Redfish ended . By the 16th winter , it was time to sell and move on. We left that area in 2005. I ,too, am an optimist but I fear that bay is probably devoid of anything but catfish now.,
 
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