medium vrs. medium fast action- pros and cons and opinions please.

skunkedalot

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considering buying a new toy and have 2 rods in mind. one is a medium action and the other medium fast. opinions on either action appreciated. pros and cons..
thanks
 

jayr

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It would help to know:
1. The exact make and model of each rod.
2. The intended target species.
3. What type of set up you want to use it for, dry, dry/dropper, nymph, streamer, etc.
4. Distances it will be used mostly for.
5. Area that you intend to fish, bluelines, tailwaters, salt, etc.
 

spm

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considering buying a new toy and have 2 rods in mind. one is a medium action and the other medium fast. opinions on either action appreciated. pros and cons..
thanks
Whichever you can cast, better. So, test drive them. Nothing anyone else says means as much as that.

steve
 

jdwy

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considering buying a new toy and have 2 rods in mind. one is a medium action and the other medium fast. opinions on either action appreciated. pros and cons..
thanks
Go for it! I've got both and IMO both actions have their place. I use my Radian when I need to punch a hole through the wind plus a need for max distance. Sold an old Scott G a couple months ago and replaced it with the new Scott GS which is a slower more relaxed casting rod than the Radian which I'll use for less windy days. I bought the GS during the most miserable part of the winter, wind and cold wise, only been on the river 3-4 times and have yet to catch a fish with it---we're talk'in frustration. Cast it quite a bit here at home and so far I like it a lot.
 

silver creek

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Like Jayr, I think this is a decision that should not be made in a vacuum.

What kind of fishing do you do and do you have other rods? How experienced a fly caster are you?
 

WNCtroutstalker

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It would help to know:
1. The exact make and model of each rod.
2. The intended target species.
3. What type of set up you want to use it for, dry, dry/dropper, nymph, streamer, etc.
4. Distances it will be used mostly for.
5. Area that you intend to fish, bluelines, tailwaters, salt, etc.
What he said. Definitions of "medium" and "medium fast" are fuzzy and can vary greatly.
 

skunkedalot

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appreciate the questions- here are some answers

experience- intermediate level caster( guessing). have fly fished for 30 plus years(gulp)

It would help to know:
1. The exact make and model of each rod.
looking at 8 or 8 1/2 foot 4 weight
Redington CT
St Croix Rio Santo
filling in a gap in my quiver - 4 weight gap.(like I really need another rod LOL)

2. The intended target species.
generalist- rivers -trout, smallies and pond panfish mainly. already have rods for larger bass etc.

3. What type of set up you want to use it for, dry, dry/dropper, nymph, streamer, etc.
Need/want a rod for fishing dries and mending capabilities.
I have other rods for streamer, buggers, poppers etc

4. Distances it will be used mostly for.
i find most of my fishing is 5 to 20 feet at most. rarely need to punch the line out there.

5. Area that you intend to fish, bluelines, tailwaters, salt, etc.
lakes, ponds, small and mid size new endlandy rivers
already have a 3 weight for small streams,

thanks
 
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jayr

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Here is something to ponder now that we know your two options.

The St. Croix Rio Santos is no longer in production so if it comes to a warranty issue/claim that may present problems. The Redington CT is still in production.

One other question that I would also ask, forgot to before, was what are most of your rods already as far as fast or moderate, etc. ?
 

silver creek

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appreciate the questions- here are some answers

experience- intermediate level caster( guessing). have fly fished for 30 plus years(gulp)

It would help to know:
1. The exact make and model of each rod.
looking at 8 or 8 1/2 foot 4 weight
Redington CT
St Croix Rio Santo
filling in a gap in my quiver - 4 weight gap.(like I really need another rod LOL)

2. The intended target species.
generalist- rivers -trout, smallies and pond panfish mainly. already have rods for larger bass etc.

3. What type of set up you want to use it for, dry, dry/dropper, nymph, streamer, etc.
Need/want a rod for fishing dries and mending capabilities.
I have other rods for streamer, buggers, poppers etc

4. Distances it will be used mostly for.
i find most of my fishing is 5 to 20 feet at most. rarely need to punch the line out there.

5. Area that you intend to fish, bluelines, tailwaters, salt, etc.
lakes, ponds, small and mid size new endlandy rivers
already have a 3 weight for small streams,

thanks
My thought is that you really are not going to target smallies with a 4 wt. Nor is a 4 wt a saltwater rod. Nor is a 4 wt a "streamer" rod although smaller streamers can be cast.

So for targeting trout and panfish with a shorter 4 wt rod of 8 - 8.5 ft., I would get a medium action. I would get the 8.5 ft if it would work for your blue lines. Otherwise go with the 8 footer.
 

jayr

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My thought is that you really are not going to target smallies with a 4 wt. Nor is a 4 wt a saltwater rod. Nor is a 4 wt a "streamer" rod although smaller streamers can be cast.

So for targeting trout and panfish with a shorter 4 wt rod of 8 - 8.5 ft., I would get a medium action. I would get the 8.5 ft if it would work for your blue lines. Otherwise go with the 8 footer.
I agree totally about the smallmouth rod. At least around where I fish for them, a 5 weight would be okay, but a 6 is even better throwing larger streamers and poppers.
 

skunkedalot

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One other question that I would also ask, forgot to before, was what are most of your rods already as far as fast or moderate, etc.

My current 3 weight is a medium/fast. my 6/7 weights are medium(moderate)
my glass rods are slow.
thanks to all who have responded. the comment about the warrantee is a great one- didnt think of that until now- thanks.
 

jayr

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One other question that I would also ask, forgot to before, was what are most of your rods already as far as fast or moderate, etc.

My current 3 weight is a medium/fast. my 6/7 weights are medium(moderate)
my glass rods are slow.
thanks to all who have responded. the comment about the warrantee is a great one- didnt think of that until now- thanks.

The vast majority of mine are moderate or as Orvis puts it, full flex. Orvis Superfine Carbons, Sage LL's, Scott G2, etc.

I grew up on fiberglass and early graphite. Moderate/medium is more my style so to speak. I do have a few faster action rods, but they are not near as numerous as the others.
 
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sweetandsalt

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One other question that I would also ask, forgot to before, was what are most of your rods already as far as fast or moderate, etc.

My current 3 weight is a medium/fast. my 6/7 weights are medium(moderate)
my glass rods are slow.
thanks to all who have responded. the comment about the warrantee is a great one- didnt think of that until now- thanks.
There is a big dose of personal preference and habit in your question. I fish rods from deep flexing like Douglas Upstream to super fast like Sage SALT...it is primarily habitat - technique driven. So, fishing a small mountain stream where virtually all casts are under 35' there are advantages to a shorter, deeper flexing rod adept at loading with little line out for short, accurate shots...Scott GS, Sage T LL. On a medium sized river a medium fast rod generates more line speed for line control to enhance dry fly presentation...SKY-G, Sage X. On big water and particularly in the salt a faster more powerful rod enables good casting in the wind and for potential distance, larger flies too...Sage Igniter, Loomis NRX. And all shades of grey in-between. Ideally, length, line weight and action are tailored to the fishing at hand and I encourage development of a casting stroke easily adaptable to effortlessly casting with any type of fly rod. The dynamics are he same while tip travel and acceleration rates vary.
 

flav

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I own several 8-9 foot 4 weights ranging from medium to medium fast action. For stream trout and smallies at the distances you're talking about, I think the CT is the way to go. It'll load more easily at those short distances, roll casting is easier, and the typical fish are more fun on a fuller flexing rod. I save my faster rods for bigger water where longer casts, heavier nymph rigs, longer mends, more wind, and fish that like to run live.
 

silver creek

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sweetandsalt

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s. c., No intent to hijack this thread...better a sperate one dedicated to this issue...but articulate descriptions of rod taper traits largely elude me. Slow, Medium and Fast do not do it and how and where rods bend and how much is just not codified language. I try but do not succeed as best I'd like to.
 

Unknownflyman

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It is really tough for me to describe action and taper characteristics.

There is no cons, except for the fact that you just dropped some coin or serious coin on a rod you don't like or like the casting the tempo of, is too powerful for your needs, or worse in my opinion, too weak for your needs.

Everyone is different, fishes different size rivers, and one size does not fit all, one brand doesn't fit all, but there are general observations and brands that are favored for different kinds of fly fishing including what we would call speed.

I think a number of fly men here on the forum that try day in and out to best describe a wide variety of rods, for free, mind you, the newbie questions, the veteran questions, and everything in-between. I`d like to thank Sweetandsalt for sharing his passion and honest observations day in and out, and there are many others Ard and Silvercreek has been tirelessly helping people and especially newbies since I got here years ago. I dont have all the time to list them all but there is a lot of good guys on this forum.

As to my own descriptions,


There is no rod too fast for me, but there are rods too slow and underpowered for me.

The river, my mood and the conditions, select my rods for me on any given day, and all three are in constant flux.

In simplest form that's the best I can describe the pros and cons and my reasoning. The sweet spots and there are many in my quiver, are specialty rods, and setups that personally turn me on, others may turn up their nose, or scowl but they just make me smile and fish with accuracy and hopefully a little grace on my favorite trout rivers.

I have rods for fishing one river, one run, and long distance spey rigs that can jack line 160`they are my beloved tools, and others I`m just comfortable they are in the vault there just in case and not used much.


You don't know what you don't know, its not anyones fault, its not bad, not in the least by asking questions its good and we all love discussion and dissection but only the end user can pick the fly rod they like best.

There is trial and error, wasted money, bad calls, and pure luck and joy. Its best to look for all around good rods at first, and cast them all, fish with friends, join a club, cast cast and cast some more and you will know for yourself what medium and medium fast is, and where they excel.

One size does not fit all in fly fishing, its just the start of the journey, a peek into what is possible.
 
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proheli

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It is really tough for me to describe action and taper characteristics.

There is no cons, except for the fact that you just dropped some coin or serious coin on a rod you don't like or like the casting the tempo of, is too powerful for your needs, or worse in my opinion, too weak for your needs.

Everyone is different, fishes different size rivers, and one size does not fit all, one brand doesn't fit all, but there are general observations and brands that are favored for different kinds of fly fishing including what we would call speed.

I think a number of fly men here on the forum that try day in and out to best describe a wide variety of rods, for free, mind you, the newbie questions, the veteran questions, and everything in-between. I`d like to thank Sweetandsalt for sharing his passion and honest observations day in and out, and there are many others Ard and Silvercreek has been tirelessly helping people and especially newbies since I got here years ago. I dont have all the time to list them all but there is a lot of good guys on this forum.

As to my own descriptions,


There is no rod too fast for me, but there are rods too slow and underpowered for me.

The river, my mood and the conditions, select my rods for me on any given day, and all three are in constant flux.

In simplest form that's the best I can describe the pros and cons and my reasoning. The sweet spots and there are many in my quiver, are specialty rods, and setups that personally turn me on, others may turn up their nose, or scowl but they just make me smile and fish with accuracy and hopefully a little grace on my favorite trout rivers.

I have rods for fishing one river, one run, and long distance spey rigs that can jack line 160`they are my beloved tools, and others I`m just comfortable they are in the vault there just in case and not used much.


You don't know what you don't know, its not anyones fault, its not bad, not in the least by asking questions its good and we all love discussion and dissection but only the end user can pick the fly rod they like best.

There is trial and error, wasted money, bad calls, and pure luck and joy. Its best to look for all around good rods at first, and cast them all, fish with friends, join a club, cast cast and cast some more and you will know for yourself what medium and medium fast is, and where they excel.

One size does not fit all in fly fishing, its just the start of the journey, a peek into what is possible.
Every once in awhile someone says it all just right and it comes across like poetry. Nicely done, FFF friend.
 
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