MONO LINES RIGS what are the pros and cons, your thoughts?

Uncle Stu

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My take on it.

What's the biggest difference between spin fishing and fly fishing?

Spin fishing using a light line and the weight of the lure casts the line.

Fly fishing uses almost weightless flies and the weight of the line casts the flies.

I'll hold back my opinion but those are the accepted definitions of the two ways to fish. Where do you think a mono line on a fly rod fits in?
I like your definition. The folks I know who use mono on fly rods, are using it to throw shooting heads, so your definition would still apply: the line provides the weight, rather than the lure.
 

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Probably the last question you should ask me is what are my thoughts as the OP did. I admit to being an old, opinionated, cranky, dry fly fisherman.

I don't really apologize for it. It's just who I am. Seriously, you all can fish anyways you want and i'm fine with it being your choice to do as you please.

I love bamboo, silk lines, and classic dry flies. They make me smile and smiling is good.

Carry on.
 

trev

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Just a quick question Trev. Would you rather catch a trout on a dry fly or a nymph?
Typically I fish wets, spiders most often. Dry fly fishing has it time and place, and I will use a dry if the fish tell me to, but it is just to boring for me to adopt it as my go to method. I think generally that people that stick to only dry fly casting like casting more than fishing and that's OK. Casting is more of an art than fishing and I understand that many folks find joy in it.
I fish.
I was a grown up when I took up fly fishing and I did not do so to make fishing more difficult, I switched from spin fishing to fly rod very simply because it is so much less work and it is so much easier. Flies provide more versatility than any other hook and line method. We can use lures so tiny that they are hard for me to see and instantly switch to foot long bait imitations, we can place our lures at any depth in the water column and we can repeat a point delivery time after time with extreme accuracy. It should be the simplest means of catching a fish.
If we say "It is not about catching fish", then why bother with water? Why attach hooks?
I fish.
 

losthwy

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I was very surprised how this thread took a hard right turn and negativity toward certain types of line.
Tenkara fly fishing has been around for more than 200 years. If one chooses to not to regard it as fly fishing because it never has used the relative new floating line, so be it. The tools we use are and have always been evolving and will continue to do so. Fly fishing with wood poles with horse hair and silk lines was fly fishing for hundreds of years, fly fishing with bamboo is fly fishing, fly fishing with fiberglass rods is fly fishing, fly fishing with graphite is fly fishing. Some would and haved disagreed. I see no difference in that. And the hair splitting over lines. No it isn't only about catching fish, see Zane Grey. But, if a new pattern or a mono line brings another fish or two to the net, makes the day on the water just that much better. And that isn't a bad thing.
 

trev

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I was very surprised how this thread took a hard right turn and negativity toward certain types of line.
Left turn I would have said, but we should stay out of politics, eh?
You shouldn't have been. in post #15 "....3..2..1 till someone breathlessly reports mono isn’t‘really fly fishing anyway haha" and I almost said similar in my first post to the thread.
Tackle merchants and magazine salesmen have encouraged dispute and division in the ranks of anglers at least since the post WW2 boom, dissension causes arguments that draw attention to the tools used and thus interest is generated and sales increased. Increased sales by the tackle suppliers generates more advertising and thus greater income for the magazine, so next month the magazine will publish an opposing view and stir greater disagreement and it becomes circular.
 

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Just a couple questions, why don't you also list the soaked gut? and Do your "classic dry flies" use only natural materials, including the thread? Only Catskill patterns and sizes?

Yes, only natural materials. Mostly silk thread. I never mentioned fishing like they did before mono leader material. I said I like Bamboo, silk lines, and natural material classic dry flies. Please don't add anything to that or make assumptions.

You never answered the question. Would you rather catch a tout on a dry or nymph? I won't say anything about North Country Spiders because it's the only fly that i'll use sub-surface. I've mentioned that on this forum before. I was even going to try Spiders for a whole season to see how they did. I do fish them upstream like a dry. Stewart style.
 

losthwy

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Food for thought and my last post on the right turn.
An argument could be made that those use mono line euro fly fishing is more of a fly fisher than a dry fly fisher. A dry fly fishing person uses a what for a leader? Mono, 9 ft of mono that is laying on the water. A euro fly fishing person mono doesn't touch the water. Most of which is in the guides. Kinda makes the mono thing a bit odd.
 

trev

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You never answered the question. Would you rather catch a tout on a dry or nymph?
I thought I did, wets are my preferred bait for trout, dries and nymphs are both just other ways to get there and I really have no preferance in which to catch a trout on. I'll put it this way, if my intent is to get a sun tan and exercise dries get the nod; if I want dinner and the wets aren't working chances are I'll sink a nymph upstream. If you want to talk bass, there I do prefer dries over nymphs, it is after all about catching the fish.
 
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sasquatch7

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You could get together at an Orvis store and protest because the sell mono lines and nymphing rods . That will really teach them and set your points in stone . How dare they sell spin casting line . What will they try to push next ? :unsure:
 

old timer

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I though I did, wets are my preferred bait for trout, dries and nymphs are both just other ways to get there and I really have no preferance in which to catch a trout on. I'll put it this way, if my intent is to get a sun tan and exercise dries get the nod; if I want dinner and the wets aren't working chances are I'll sink a nymph upstream. If you want to talk bass, there I do prefer dries over nymphs, it is after all about catching the fish.
You're the first one i've talked to that didn't say they prefer to catch a trout on a dry. The question has nothing to do with how many fish does a method catch compared to others. It's a question of the physical act of catching the trout. What method gives you the most pleasure to do?
 

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Food for thought and my last post on the right turn.
An argument could be made that those use mono line euro fly fishing is more of a fly fisher than a dry fly fisher. A dry fly fishing person uses a what for a leader? Mono, 9 ft of mono that is laying on the water. A euro fly fishing person mono doesn't touch the water. Most of which is in the guides. Kinda makes the mono thing a bit odd.
Why is whether the leader is on or off the water a requirement of whether it's fly fishing or not? You can lift the leader off the water fishing a dry too. It doesn't really matter. The length of the cast usually determines that. No, matter what kind of fly you're using.
 

trev

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you guys must be bored....
Not quite as bored as I might be fishing dry flies for trout but the water has been high here for two months or more and I'm afraid senility will set in if I just sit here.
The question has nothing to do with how many fish does a method catch compared to others.
You obviously are more easily entertained than I, if I'm not catching fish I hate to waste the effort of casting; maybe I'm just lazy but casting doesn't do anything for me except make my shoulder hurt. In the ten years I fished the most, and I tried to get an hour or three in every day, I probably didn't average an hour a month of overhead casting. I did learn to fish dries, but they are like 10 minutes now or an half hour next week, even rarer in the snow months and nymphs are there 24/7/365. My wet flies often pass as either nymph or dry.
I haven't used an all mono rig since ~1982-3, because it requires overhead casting with light flies or water load and lob with shot and I've rarely fished places where a rollcast didn't work better for me than all the rod waving overhead. Often as not my dries are served with a snap rather than a cast. But just because I don't use it doesn't mean it won't work or that it is not fishing. It simply means I like a heavy line and roll casting better than ultra light back casting.
 

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You still don't understand the question. I'm not trying to convince you to fish dries. I'm asking.........when you do catch a trout on a dry. Is it more enjoyable than using a sub-surface fly? Maybe that doesn't matter to you and all you want to do is catch fish. That would at least answer the question.

I'm trying to make a point but you're making it hard.
 

trev

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.when you do catch a trout on a dry.
I can't really remember that as a separate circumstance, I think it happened twice last fall, but then those may have been on spiders, it's so unusual for me to use dries.
When will the creek go down?
 

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It will be a while before rivers/creeks go down here. I have two tailwaters I can go to but they're a longer drive than i'd like. Taylor and the Frying Pan.

So, my point was going to be if you enjoyed catching trout on dries more than any other way. I do too. So, why wouldn't I do it all the time? I did get a lot better at it by concentrating on it. You really don't need a hatch to catch trout on dries. However, it didn't work on you since it doesn't seem to matter how you catch them as long as you're catching. That's fine and it's your way. My way is to make the dries work. Just catching fish to catch them got boring a long time ago. So, now I like the challenge of making the dries work when they shouldn't. Plus, I enjoy seeing the trout take the fly from the surface. I miss that with sub-surface flies.

The best part of fly fishing is there are so many ways to do it. Pick what you like and have fun. If you're not having fun and you're not forced to fish for supper. You may need to rethink what you're doing and make adjustments.
 
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