Montana nymph?.

bumble54

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I'd searched around on the internet but found no answer to a question that's been puzzling me. I seem to recall, that George Grant's original tying's of the Montana nymph included a brown version?, does anyone know if this is so?, or is it just my imagination?.
 

ifitswims

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I have only known this pattern in black and yellow. But I am referring to the Montana Stone?

Of course tying it in brown has been done many times with productivity.
 
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silver creek

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I'd searched around on the internet but found no answer to a question that's been puzzling me. I seem to recall, that George Grant's original tying's of the Montana nymph included a brown version?, does anyone know if this is so?, or is it just my imagination?.
I have both of George Grant's books, "Montana Trout Flies" and "The Master Fly Weaver."

The Montana nymph pattern is on pg 38 of "Montana Trout Flies" and is black and yellow. There is no brown and yellow version mentioned in either book.
 

bumble54

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I have both of George Grant's books, "Montana Trout Flies" and "The Master Fly Weaver."

The Montana nymph pattern is on pg 38 of "Montana Trout Flies" and is black and yellow. There is no brown and yellow version mentioned in either book.

Thanks S.C., I had half convinced myself there was a brown version, obviously I'm having more than a few senior moments of late. ;)
 

silver creek

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I guess that shows there is a is a brown version of the Montana nymph. Now we need to know if George Grant developed it.

KInd of like Len Halliday's original Adams and all the variations other tiers added later.
 

iv_wjb

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There was no reference (or credit given) to George Grant in the book I have on hand. My apologies if my post came-across as contradictory to your excellent information. It was not intended to do anything other than offer a suggestion of a pattern which I thought may be helpful.
 

bumble54

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I’m not sure if this is what you’re looking for but, on P.112 of this book, there is a pattern called the Montana.

View attachment 33679

I tie (and fish) variants in brown, tan and olive... All are productive for me.

View attachment 33680

Hope that helps!
Maybe my memory isn't failing after all, phew what a relief.:D I had the feeling I'd seen a brown version somewhere, just couldn't recall where and as S.C. says, just need to find if George Grant was the originator of the brown version.
 

iv_wjb

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I’m glad it was of some help! I wasn’t sure whether this was the fly you were looking for but, I had been tying some of these recently, and it twigged my memory. Sheepishly, I admit, I have no idea who George Grant was and he is not referred to in the pages of the book I referenced. I suspect the information I have is a much-modified version of the original, tailored to suit current techniques and materials. The author / tyer may not have any idea who the originator is?

Anyhow, if you need more-detailed photos or the recipe, don’t hesitate to ask. Good luck with it... I’ve had considerable success fishing it and it’s variants!!
 

silver creek

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I’m glad it was of some help! I wasn’t sure whether this was the fly you were looking for but, I had been tying some of these recently, and it twigged my memory. Sheepishly, I admit, I have no idea who George Grant was and he is not referred to in the pages of the book I referenced. I suspect the information I have is a much-modified version of the original, tailored to suit current techniques and materials. The author / tyer may not have any idea who the originator is?

Anyhow, if you need more-detailed photos or the recipe, don’t hesitate to ask. Good luck with it... I’ve had considerable success fishing it and it’s variants!!
George Grant is in Wikipedia and is best known for woven hair hackle flies.


Here's how he tied his flies:

 

Caliborn

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In one of my tying book it shows a brown stonefly that looks like a montana but they call it Ted's Stonefly and attributes it to Ted Trueblood. IMG_0481.JPG
 

iv_wjb

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George Grant is in Wikipedia and is best known for woven hair hackle flies.


Here's how he tied his flies:

Ah, that's excellent info and much appreciated!! I'll enjoy reading about Mr. Grant and his work - thanks Silver Creek!
 

silver creek

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I fished a private section of the Big Lost River near Mackay, Idaho with Jim Greenlee. His son-in-law had a cattle ranch there with the Big Lost running through the ranck. It was the first and only time I have fished a woven fly called the Mackay Special. It is tied/woven with embroidery floss and horse mane hair. I found it to be very effective on the Big Lost and both Jim and I hooked some good sized rainbow trout.

Screen Shot 2021-04-05 at 4.14.33 PM.png
 

trev

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Well knowing who Grant was, and knowing the Montana fly; I would never ever have associated one with the other. Learn things every day.
 

WWKimba

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Yep, Ole George was trying to find out how Franz Potts was tying his patterns and could never figure Franz's woven hair hackle - so he designed his own weave and found out that it was easier and at least as effective as Franz's method! Franz had patented the his woven hackle method in March 1934 and he had patents on various parts of his 30 fly patterns going back to his first in 1925. In fact Franz was so secretive of his flies he had the woven hair hackle tied in the Netherlands by some of his cousins, the fly bodies tied by some women he hired in the Missoula and all parts were sent to him so only he could do the final construction! No wonder George was so curious!

Kim
 
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