New 7 Wgt

zesto

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I'm getting the urge to get a new 7 wgt and such urges need to be addressed. I never fish the salt and will use the rod for lake fishing at reasonably shallow river mouths with small to medium streamer patterns for rainbow trout 4-6lb average with the occasional brownie up to double figures. Casts need to be long up to 80-90 feet during daylight but closer in at night when the fish come in closer.

I like 9' rods and I've narrowed it down to three rods. Asquith 790, Centric 907 and Stickman T7. I can try the first two at my local tackle store but obviously not the Stickman T7. I have small hands even though I'm 6' and 220lbs and like the idea that the T7 could be ordered with a smaller grip.

I would be grateful if anyone here that has tried the T7 could share their experience with that rod.
 

dr d

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I'm getting the urge to get a new 7 wgt and such urges need to be addressed. I never fish the salt and will use the rod for lake fishing at reasonably shallow river mouths with small to medium streamer patterns for rainbow trout 4-6lb average with the occasional brownie up to double figures. Casts need to be long up to 80-90 feet during daylight but closer in at night when the fish come in closer.

I like 9' rods and I've narrowed it down to three rods. Asquith 790, Centric 907 and Stickman T7. I can try the first two at my local tackle store but obviously not the Stickman T7. I have small hands even though I'm 6' and 220lbs and like the idea that the T7 could be ordered with a smaller grip.

I would be grateful if anyone here that has tried the T7 could share their experience with that rod.
there is a very positive test in german flyfishing forum under test > rods

nice we

thomas
 

rsagebrush

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I have a T7 and really like it and I am not all that fond of fast rods. As compared to the other two I can't help you there but I have no reason to change out as my Stickman is so pleasant to use.
I use it mostly for smallmouth fishing back here on the local rivers and I have no need to cast 80 to 90 feet but it plops a #4 or #2 'Clawdad' perfectly out to 60 feet without a problem.
 

osseous

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Making a grip smaller is a 10 minute job for any competent rod builder. Don't let that streer you away if you fall in live with a rod~ Fixing Scott's insistence on putting the bulge in their grip in the wrong place is a bit bigger challenge

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sweetandsalt

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I have not cast the new Scott so have no opinion but love my T7 Stealth. Asquith is great and I'd cast NRX+ and Sage Igniter #7 if you have the opportunity. I had the good fortune to test cast T7 before doing my 7-weight research at the Edison Show. Had it not been for that impressive opportunity I would have gotten the Igniter.
 

zesto

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Thanks for the input guys.

I'll try the NRX+ as well. I already have three Igniters #5,6 & 8 so would like something different. My Igniter #8 is mainly used with an ultra fast sinking shooting head for deep lake and large river fishing. Realistically speaking I don't need a new rod, it's just that I want one as I could use the Igniter #8 with a floating line. New rods are good for the soul. :)

osseous I agree that reducing the grip size is not hard and I've done it a few times before on some expensive rods. The problem is getting any voids/pits that might show up filled properly. I've tried mixing cork dust with various white glues but I've never found something that works well.

Unfortunately at present, due to border restrictions and vastly reduced air freight it would probably take several months to import a Stickman rod. However, if it's worth the wait then I'd be prepared to do it.
 

zesto

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Thanks osseous. I'll try and get some from the U.S. as I want to reduce the diameter of my Igniter #8 first off. I like the shape but it's a little too chubby compared to the lighter line Igniters.
 

osseous

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Thanks osseous. I'll try and get some from the U.S. as I want to reduce the diameter of my Igniter #8 first off. I like the shape but it's a little too chubby compared to the lighter line Igniters.
I'll trade ya- i've got serious meat hooks. Most trout rods are a no-go for me as a result.

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proheli

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You say 80-90’ with a 7 wt. Are you using a regular floating line? It sounds pretty far to me. I fished a T7 in the salt for half a day, Loved it, but 80 and 90‘ is more than I was throwing. Also, the T7 does not feel snappy to me. It feels like an all around good/great rod, but I like a bit more life feeling in a trout rod. The NRX + will go the distance, but lose you some feel in close. Same with Igniter. I think it would be quite rewarding to dial in a 7wt line on Igniter. A heavy front loaded taper with just shortish head might get the rod bending at all casting lengths. That leaves Asquith with its subtle tip for in close and its power for the distance, but it’s also got the bigger price tag. Still, it might be the only one that is good short and long. If you’re that good of a caster that you can just hit your 80‘ or 90’ casts when fishing, then I’d also add TNT 907 and Sector 907 to your list. Similar tapers that give you nice control off the tip in close.
 

zesto

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Thanks proheli.

At the shallow river mouths where I fish in Lake Taupo being able to cast as far as possible is a necessity most of time in daylight hours because the trout are usually a fair way off the drop off. Not a problem if standing in the direct stream flow as you can let the current take your line out. Some actually splice two double taper floating together and let the lot go out to the backing in the current. Not strictly legal as it's railing but they seem to get away with it. The trouble is that if there are already anglers in the main current you're forced to either side of the rip, as we call it here. Then you have to get your line out as far as possible. I don't have any trouble casting all 30 yards of a WF floating line provided it's not blowing across ways or directly inwards. Mind you, I'm only standing in water knee deep.

Sounds like I might just as well get another spool for my Lamson Speedster S reel and use my #8 Igniter with a Rio Gold. Tried the Sector 907 and even though it's a beautiful rod and pleasurable to cast it lacks a little authority out further. Price tag doesn't worry me too much as I learnt long ago to buy once cry once.
 
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steveid

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Thanks proheli.

At the shallow river mouths where I fish in Lake Taupo being able to cast as far as possible is a necessity most of time in daylight hours because the trout are usually a fair way off the drop off. Not a problem if standing in the direct stream flow as you can let the current take your line out. Some actually splice two double taper floating together and let the lot go out to the backing in the current. Not strictly legal as it's railing but they seem to get away with it. The trouble is that if there are already anglers in the main current you're forced to either side of the rip, as we call it here. Then you have to get your line out as far as possible. I don't have any trouble casting all 30 yards of a WF floating line provided it's not blowing across ways or directly inwards. Mind you, I'm only standing in water knee deep.

Sounds like I might just as well get another spool for my Lamson Speedster S reel and use my #8 Igniter with a Rio Gold. Tried the Sector 907 and even though it's a beautiful rod and pleasurable to cast it lacks a little authority out further. Price tag doesn't worry me too much as I learnt long ago to buy once cry once.
If the Sector lacks authority for you, then I'm afraid none of the rods listed in your original post will fit the bill, except maybe Asquith.

I have the Igniter 7wt, and it will do all you need it to do. Probably swings a bit lighter than your 8wt. But, as you have alluded to, you may be better off just getting another spool/line combo for your Igniter. Truthfully, a looped backing and a Rio Cranky kit will be almost as fast as a new spool and significantly cheaper.
 

zesto

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If the Sector lacks authority for you, then I'm afraid none of the rods listed in your original post will fit the bill, except maybe Asquith.

I have the Igniter 7wt, and it will do all you need it to do. Probably swings a bit lighter than your 8wt. But, as you have alluded to, you may be better off just getting another spool/line combo for your Igniter. Truthfully, a looped backing and a Rio Cranky kit will be almost as fast as a new spool and significantly cheaper.
Thanks steveid, I never thought or even knew about the Rio Cranky kit; I'll buy one tomorrow if they're in stock. I'm still intrigued by the Stickman T7 though as S&S and rsagebrush rate it and will probably get one anyway for general use like chucking indicator, ultra heavy tungsten bead nymphs for winter run spawning rainbows in the Tongariro River. My old T&T HS 907 currently fills that roll but being a 2 piece it can be cumbersome walking up the river trails. A 4 piece can easily be attached to by Simms backpack.
 

hatidua

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Tried the Sector 907 and even though it's a beautiful rod and pleasurable to cast it lacks a little authority out further.
I know this thread is about 7wt rods but when I read "lacks authority out further", and in conjunction with the fact that every trout picture I see from NZ is of a trout the size of a whale, one rod came to mind: 8wt Asquith. While I own plenty of 7wt rods (including a 7wt Asquith, and others), I've never cast any rod in which the entire line left the rod with such ease. The first time I cast an 8wt Asquith I put in the same amount of effort I would any other 8wt rod and it launched the entire fly line in a manner that was really quite impressive. Just a thought...
 

melvynsegal

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If your fishing Taupo, I don’t know why you would look further than CTS rods, made in New Zealand. I built a 6 weight CTS from an affinity X blank. It is the lightest, most accurate rod with the quickest tip recovery I have ever cast. For streamer fishing and my required distances I use a 7, but if you got a 7 weight rod, you could use an 8 in close if needed. I know you would be pleased with the rod’s performance... Mel
 

okiekev

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Haven’t tried the others but the Asquith is a special rod. On the flats, it’s truly one of those rods that make the argument that the right 7 is the next 8 wt.
 

zesto

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If your fishing Taupo, I don’t know why you would look further than CTS rods, made in New Zealand. I built a 6 weight CTS from an affinity X blank. It is the lightest, most accurate rod with the quickest tip recovery I have ever cast. For streamer fishing and my required distances I use a 7, but if you got a 7 weight rod, you could use an 8 in close if needed. I know you would be pleased with the rod’s performance... Mel
Do you live in NZ Melvyn? I don't know anything about CTS rods so thanks for the info.
 
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