nuther casting question

ratherfish

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8'6" 5WT St Croix rod - I tied on a double hook heavy headed fly, the boys in Casper, WY sold me last fall. Out in the pond trying to entice a bass, didn't work, stupid bass, it looks tasty. Anyway, as I was casting I could feel the fly on both ends of the cast, the back-cast for sure and the false forward cast, basically thumped my rod - too light of a rod I suppose???
 

LOC

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Try using a Belgain style cast and that may help smooth things out when you have no other options on the water.
 

tcorfey

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Watch the Orvis Streamer video featured in a different recent post. It has a section devoted to casting and the Belgian cast is part of it.
 

original cormorant

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That sounds like a VERY heavy fly, which needs a heavier line to deliver it. Do you really need to fish that fly?

Rod choice should generally be driven by fly choice, so choose a different fly unless you believe that no other fly will catch, in which case as Silver says change the rod!

A stiffer leader may also help a bit.
 

philly

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I'm not sure a stiffer leader will help. I just finished tying up some frog patterns with double hooks and they're definitely 8 wgt flies. Wouldn't even think of fishing them with my 5 wgt. A couple of things. If you're hitting your rod with the heavy fly, there's a chance you might crack or break the rod. Second, you may start bouncing the fly off the back of your head. If it hits you eye first it will hurt. If it hits you with the hook points that's pain.
I speak from experience on both parts of the second one.
 

ratherfish

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That sounds like a VERY heavy fly, which needs a heavier line to deliver it. Do you really need to fish that fly?

Rod choice should generally be driven by fly choice, so choose a different fly unless you believe that no other fly will catch, in which case as Silver says change the rod!

A stiffer leader may also help a bit.
I don't need to use that fly, it just looked like a bass should like it. I do think the rod is too light, but I also told those boys at The Ugly Bug shop in Casper what I had for a rod and they sold it to me. It just seems too heavy for the rod to me.
 

ratherfish

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I'm not sure a stiffer leader will help. I just finished tying up some frog patterns with double hooks and they're definitely 8 wgt flies. Wouldn't even think of fishing them with my 5 wgt. A couple of things. If you're hitting your rod with the heavy fly, there's a chance you might crack or break the rod. Second, you may start bouncing the fly off the back of your head. If it hits you eye first it will hurt. If it hits you with the hook points that's pain.
I speak from experience on both parts of the second one.
Ya, I should not have used the term "thumped" - the fly is not hitting the rod, I just mean that I can feel the fly very much on each end of the cast.
 

brooktrout21

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You can definitely bass fish with a 5wt but your fly selection will be limited or you’ll have to deal with a modified casting experience at times. I did lots of bass fishing as a kid with lighter weight rods but it quickly becomes less of an art and more of a “get that fly over there”.

Definitely look at other line options for your 5wt. A heavier taper up front might help. Eventually you’ll probably want a 7 or 8 wt.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

bumble54

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Any cast where a heavy fly has to stop and reverse course is going to give a tug on the line, the heavier the fly the greater the tug. As mentioned the Belgian cast keeps the fly moving on a path that doesn't cause it to stop and reverse, it also tends to keep a heavy fly away from your rod, lessening the chance of it causing damage. the final forward cast and shoot should be aimed at the horizon, not at a point in the water ( a heavy fly carries a lot of momentum ), this gives the fly a chance to straighten the leader before it falls, rather than crashes, onto the water.
 

proheli

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Your fly has become a separate missile at the end of your line. The line is supposed to be fatter in the middle and narrowing to a point, and the mass of the line gradually becoming less and unfurling out, makes our loop and gently delivers the fly.

A bad cast exasserbates your situation, but with a too heavy fly, you basically have a bendy stick, a string, and lead weight on the end. You just end up slingshotting the fly back and forth. Yes, if your cast is PERFECT, you can cast big flys on small rods. That would be skill level 10. At the bottom of the scale, at 1, you have the slingshot example. We've all been at level in your situation before, lol.
 
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