Perch/Crappy Flies

photoguy

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^ Yes...North of Boston on the Ipswich.

Funny aside...a few years ago I was fishing the Upper Connecticut in NH. At the end of the day while we were breaking down, a big ol' 1970's Cadillac Eldorado puled in to the parking area with 3 old time Mainers inside. I usually find myself in a conversation with anybody that is standing still and this was no exception. When they asked where I was from I told them the name of my little town fully expecting that they'd never heard of it. Their eyes got big and they said 'The Ipswich runs right thorough there!...'. They went on to tell me that back in the 30's and 40's the Ipswich was one of the great trout rivers in the Northeast. Sadly these days, it's still recovering from the industrial impacts of a few decades ago, former pastured banks that are now overgrown with thousands of trees and the intense pressure to pull water for suburban lawns. There are times in the warmer months when it's difficult to detect which direction the flow is moving. It's stocked with trout in the spring and produces some good fishing through May but after that it's all Bass/Panfish/Chub etc.
 

Panfish

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Oh dude, Feel bad for ya. You probably talk funny judging by your proximity to the cities where most talk funny:ROFLMAO:
I be that area can produce some fine panfishing. I've done seminars at the Worchester. You live in a gorgeous area. Your kind of like Philly and BigJim in that you have ready access to a bunch of different fisheries, i.e. Trout, Warmwater and Salt species.
 

Panfish

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Trev you are correct. Once we and most of out neighbors sold the cows in the seventies the meadows grew up and duff absorb or slowed down run-off and the water cooled. The streams are half to two thirds the size that they once were though it wouldn't surprise me if there aren't the same number of fish there. I miss the farm days but believe the creek is much healthier now. Access isn't so good but that will get better as the trees grow higher and shade out the brushy species.
 

photoguy

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That should be good for the trout as it will help keep the water cool. Pasturing usually leads to eroded banks and often to silt in the stream.
I agree on the habitat part, but the amount of water that gets drawn out compounds an already delicate situation. I forget how much water a full sized oak tree draws daily, but it's a huge amount. Last time I checked which was in the beginning of September, the water temps were -80 degrees. Granted, not down deep but only what I could easily reach from the bank.

And yes, the area provides (wicked easy) access to lots of different species of fish both fresh and salt. And no shortage of Dunkin Donuts to grab a regular cup of coffee along the way ;)
 

trev

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probably talk funny j
I lived in RI about 15 years and acquired enough of that accent that when I visited again years later natives would see my Mo. tags on the cah and ask how long I had been away from NE, couldn't convince them that I was always from Mo. I can even say "doryahd" for "driveway". When I'm back east I fall into that speech pattern unconsciously.
 

Panfish

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Ha ha. Love it. Wish I could have seen the USA before the Industrial Age. We all live in such cool areas. Many of you don’t know Philly but he lives near the first commercial fishery in the country. Atlantic Sturgeon.
800. That is how many gallons a Mature oak draws on a hot summer day. most of us have never seen a mature oak. But they look somethinglike this. Took this yesterday at Mystic:261C8949-9931-4574-A30B-9A4A3FC31424.jpeg
 

Druunkonego

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As I suspected, and today confirmed, the little deerhair sunfish works for these, as well. Definitely going to need a sink tip/line for these though as they tend to float without. Stripped in as slow as practical, with a pause and twitch every now and then. 5E85CDEA-AEE5-4297-BADF-5C813C923D83.jpeg
4892AC3B-2A70-4EC1-A4F0-3F579BBAB903.jpeg
 

JoJer

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The paradox was also called the Spoon Minnow. I also did some searching and found a photo on the Stripersonline site. It's an epoxy spoon, and was made with the tail similar to the CK Baitfish, but without the forked tail. I know I still have at least one of them, so will sell it to you for $1 Million! 😜 :LOL:

I have no idea where it may be, but am pretty sure I have one around here somewhere. Kraft produced them in a variety of colors.
There's been a couple of magazine articles about using glue on fingernails to make spoon flys, these are made with epoxy in braid or tubing?
 

bigjim5589

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There's been a couple of magazine articles about using glue on fingernails to make spoon flys, these are made with epoxy in braid or tubing?
I'm not sure what you're asking? That Kraft spoon fly was made with a soft chamois type of material, and the epoxy was added onto it, where it's attached to the hook shank. I'm not sure how it's attached to the hook, but suspect it's just glued on with super glue after a thread base is added.

I've made spoon flies with the plastic fake fingernails, gluing them to a thread base with superglue, the epoxy over the entire body. They're easy to make, but a bit different than that Paradox Spoon.

There's a couple of good spoon flies around. One was made using flattened braid, such as EZ-Body or mylar tubing, and another using mylar tape as a form, like is used for adding to lures. Joe Bruce made an epoxy spoon many years ago, which he devised primarily for fishing in the Chesapeake Bay. It was formed with stainless wire or a heavy hard mono, and the form was filled with epoxy. It was tricky to make, but it worked. Joe bent the hooks, the old Mustad 34011, to get the shape he wanted. That spoon had more of a darting action that a typical spoon, and was very durable for fish species such as Bluefish or Spanish Mackerel.

I've posted this photo here before. If you look closely, there are two spoon flies in the box, both close to the center and in the top rows of each side of the box. One is made with the fake plastic fingernails, the other on a hard mono form, and has a flat stick-on eye added, which is also epoxy coated. I used the flies in this box primarily for the various panfish species I found in MD's brackish water tidal creeks that I used to fish frequently when I lived there.
 

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Panfish

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As I suspected, and today confirmed, the little deerhair sunfish works for these, as well. Definitely going to need a sink tip/line for these though as they tend to float without. Stripped in as slow as practical, with a pause and twitch every now and then. View attachment 27013
View attachment 27014
Enough is enough! I need that for fishing in Gouldsboro and Tobyhanna. LOL. Are there a set of instructions handy? bet they'd work perch and winter gills in that size. looks like a cross between a Matuka and a deer hair something or other. if you're willing to share a bit I'd like to tie that........
 

Druunkonego

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Enough is enough! I need that for fishing in Gouldsboro and Tobyhanna. LOL. Are there a set of instructions handy? bet they'd work perch and winter gills in that size. looks like a cross between a Matuka and a deer hair something or other. if you're willing to share a bit I'd like to tie that........
You’re on the right track with a Matuka.
Here’s a link for Jimmy Nix Shinabou Sunfish. It’s basically the same fly but with a wool head instead of deerhair. That’ll get you most of the way there. ;)
 
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