Plastic Bagged Fly Lines

ddb

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I am just fresh from a long wrangle loading a full size fly line on a fly reel -- usually a 15 minute experience. .

The manufacturer packed it in an ecologically woke -- and cheaper -- plastic baggie. No nasty, wasteful, spool -- the kind that I typically would would save and reuse to store other lines and reload them to other reels.

Removing the coiled line from the baggy went well, removing the tag on the running line end was easy... Then the wheels fell off.

The coils went into an instant massive snarl/ tangle as I worked the loop to loop fastening to my backing. It took me the best part of an hour; all my hard learned unsnarling skills from bait casting days; and a recall of words I learned in basic training 50+ YA to begin to begin to fill the reel.

Operator error played some role but I am quite sure the scene will be repeated with the next bagged fly line.
 

Hayden Creek

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Tie your backing line loop through your fly line loop. Not before.
Just use a simple figure 8 follow through.
 
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knotjoe

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I might be the only idiot here who has always had to manually unwind the line, run it out of the room, down the stairs...you knooooow.

Even the plastic spooled line would give me problems winding on directly so I just lay it all out and then start. I kinda like running my fingers over a new line anyhow to check for anomalies in the products, so no gripe there. Doesn't take much longer, looks like I'm ahead of the curve if they do away with spools in the future.
 

JoJer

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Generally, when I'm loading anew fly line, I change out backing at the same time, or I'm putting new line and backing on a new reel/spool. So, I'm winding on line first, then backing, (eye ball how it fits on the spool/reel) then taking it all off and reloading backing first. When I pull the line off what ever spool, I dump it carefully into a box (or stripping basket).
 

el jefe

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Does the fly line you are loading have a loop on both ends?

To solve the tangled mess problem, what if you stuck the loop of line on an old paper towel roll, and then put the roll and line on the paper towel holder, essentially using the old roll as an arbor which will spin freely around the holder?
 

alfaromeo

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I might be the only idiot here who has always had to manually unwind the line, run it out of the room, down the stairs...you knooooow.

Even the plastic spooled line would give me problems winding on directly so I just lay it all out and then start. I kinda like running my fingers over a new line anyhow to check for anomalies in the products, so no gripe there. Doesn't take much longer, looks like I'm ahead of the curve if they do away with spools in the future.
count me in, on that one.. i spent a cold winter evening chucking fly fine that i was trying to untangle into the condo's pool,, on the plus side..i did have spectators on this exersise
 

Ard

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Where you may have went wrong was trying for a loop to loop line to backing thing ............ I nail knot backing to the running lines.
 

trev

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yep done all that, but, I can set an empty 5 gal bucket on each side of my chair now and strip line from one to the other or from the reel to bucket or wind line onto reel from bucket with rarely a hitch. (trash cans or beer boxes work as long as the line stacks)
With that new coil and no spool, I lay the coil flat and strip from the outside of coil into a bucket, then strip from bucket to bucket to remove any twists. Some lines twist enough that may take three or more passes to get the twists out.
From the reel to bucket is simple, as from bucket to reel; to change ends strip from reel to bucket then from bucket to other bucket, then the other end to reel, this works to reverse a DT or to get the backing on the reel after back-filling new line and backing.
The key is let the stripped line fall into the bucket sort of zigzagged so that it stacks in figure eights the way a sailor "fakes down" a line. (rope) The figure eights will run out freely, that's why swabs do that.
If the new line comes on a spool, I'll usually strip it off into a bucket to start with so that it can be reversed onto the reel spool for determining backing quantity. The slowest part of any of this is turning the reel to rewind everything.

If you want loop to loop on backing line connection, just tie the backing loop long enough that the reel can pass through the finished loop, pass the backing loop through the line loop, then pass the reel through the backing loop it will form the handshake knot.
 

ddb

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Trev,

The bucket trick sounds sound.

Thanks
 

original cormorant

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For me putting a line on a reel always begins by attaching it to the backing then unwinding it at the top of the stairs and letting it tumble down before winding it onto the reel. Doing it this way avoids mishaps that can happen if you are attempting to manage the line source and wind onto the reel at the same time.
Obviously when unwinding it needs to be unwound not allowed to get twisted, so if the line isn't on a spool it needs to be on some sort of improvised spindle - for example a rod tube.

Similarly after a tropical trip my lines are washed then tumbled down the stairs before winding them under minimal tension back on to their original spools.
 

ddb

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There is some excellent advice here on avoiding the mess I got into.

But once it happens and you are staring at a Gordian knot; mumbling epithets and contemplating extreme fixes; and before reaching for Bourbon , you might try my desnarling procedure.

its a lot like Trev's idea but w/o the buckets.

Step one is to put the main snarl on your lap with the two clear ends projecting left and right over the side of the chair in large, loose, coils.

The remaining core of the snarl on your lap should be kept loose. You can pick out any obvious knots at this stage and could get real lucky and have the whole thing unravel. But don't bet on it, and don't tug any existing knots gorilla tight!

Take one end of the line and back it fully through the mess as many time as it takes to reduce the number and mass of tangles to about half. Then do the same with the other side. ( Keep your faithful Lab. kids, and wife at a distance throughout this phase. They cannot help and might become colatterly damaged. )

Once the snarl is fully depleted, coil all the line, with the backing line end on top, in large, loose, coils.

Then go about spooling your reel.

Connecting the line and backing can be done by nail knotting; using loop to loops, splicing the line and backing with heat shrink tape or by numerous other imaginitive joins created by folk with too much time on their hands and endless faith in superglue.
 

el jefe

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One thing I have found for de-tangling is to look for loops. Most of the tangles are loops that have been bound down at their base. If you can find loops and push them back through where they are tangled up, you can often de-tangle things pretty quickly.
 

johan851

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One thing I have found for de-tangling is to look for loops. Most of the tangles are loops that have been bound down at their base. If you can find loops and push them back through where they are tangled up, you can often de-tangle things pretty quickly.
I've learned this as well. Sometimes trying to back one end through can make it worse; if there are tangles formed by loops, then backing one end of the line through can turn them into proper knots. It's amazing how quickly complex knots can be formed by loops and wraps in the middle of a line.
 

Aluminumchef

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Most reels I buy have line on them, I buy used. I strip it all off stretch it, clean it and coil it up in a domino sugar container. Just be mindful when winding it on spool to avoid kinking it. Works nicely.
 
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