Practicing 2 hand casting in the grass/lawn?

Upstate

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Does anyone do this? New to 2 hand casting and it is the most convenient place sometimes. Does anyone have any recommendations for this? I have a 11’ 8 wt switch rod with a rio 8/9 floating switch line on it.

thanks , John
 

jr spey

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Use what's generally referred to as a grass leader. Use a standard leader formula with a lot of knots in it. Then leave the knot tags somewhere around an inch long (or less.) It's not ideal, but it does allow one to practice on a decent lawn.
 

dillon

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I’d suggest learning to cast with either hand up. It’s surprising how fast the muscle memory develops. I actually prefer kack handing over my off shoulder, but either way it’s important to master casts over both shoulders. The lawn is a good place to learn rather than while you’re fishing. I only Spey cast for steelhead and I enjoy the variety of casts because it give me something to do in between catching those fish...
 

ravenbc

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While you can spey cast on the grass, it is far better to do on water than it is for single hand rods. With water born spey casts it is the water tension that helps create the anchor and line tension, which creates line speed.

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huronfly

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It's good for pantomiming, but is really different than water borne casts if you intend on actually casting. I used it to teach my wife before out Skeena trip and it helped, but I would say hit the water if at all possible.
 

LOC

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Try to practice early in the morning when the grass is still wet or after it rains (depending or your region). This will help get your line to stick.
 

Ard

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I think that the only way it can be useful is if you have someone present who understands the mechanics of the casting. You need to simulate current flow by laying the line out either hard on your right or left side as if it were taken there by current. Then from that full left or right line position you can simulate the sweep - rotation into D loop and forward cast.

Without the left or right starting position you are simply going to be simulating basic roll casts. I have a grass leader that I have used for the introduction of mechanics on my lawn prior to taking people out on the river. I believe it was / is, helpful in that the student has at least a basic understanding of the various parts of the basic casts. Dry training is useful but not for much more than that basic familiarization with motions and the associated nomenclature with those motions.

A few points I believe are important: you do not to make the 'grass leader' tapered but make it with heavy enough mono so that the cut tags will provide maximum drag and resistance., I'm assuming you have looked up the construction of them. Clip the bend from a reasonably large fly and tie it to the end of the leader. You will not need very much power to execute basic casts with the leader on a lawn so don't over power it.

Soon as you understand basic motions and line positioning go to water for practice. Always clip the hook point from flies until you are sure you will not be hitting yourself. If possible find someone to teach you. If a person has what it takes to adapt to 2 hand casting I see them preforming fishable casts within 15 to 20 minutes generally once on the water. Having an instructor will help you greatly even if it's a friend who doesn't know everything.

I realize that some of what I've written may not translate clearly, for instance the part about positioning the line hard left or right.......... This is necessary in order to demonstrate how that line will end up on your downstream side when you are on current flows. The part about finding someone to instruct / help is perhaps the best course forward for the majority of new casters.

I'll leave you go with one good tip. Regardless of whether you are out for the first day or your 20th day on a river or large creek Always be aware of where the fly is located prior to the attempt at delivering the forward cast. A great many people have hooked themselves when spey casting. Some just in clothing or waders and others more seriously so if nothing else......... Always know where the fly is at before you cast.
 
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Upstate

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thanks everyone for all the replies. I have constructed grass leaders and have been out practicing. When you only have a half hour it’s better than nothing. I have been keeping it simple with a switch cast and double Spey for now. It has helped me solidify the major points of these casts I have gleaned from various videos. The learning curve when I get to the water should be shorter.
As for the hard left or right I get what your saying Ard. To start from that position I have been just single hand casting or double hand casting traditional style to get the line in the position I need to simulate my line in the current (hard right or left). And then start the double Spey for instance.

here’s a question. Fishing big lakes casting from shore. What casts are out there for this type of fishing? No current to give you a hard right or left. Stripping in line and wanting to recast. Not much behind either.
 

dillon

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What type of line are you casting with? My favorite is a mid belly floating line. The “ touch and go“ single Spey and snake roll are my favorites. Simple elegance. However, with sinking lines a water anchored cast is much easier to achieve desired results.
 

Upstate

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What type of line are you casting with? My favorite is a mid belly floating line. The “ touch and go“ single Spey and snake roll are my favorites. Simple elegance. However, with sinking lines a water anchored cast is much easier to achieve desired results.
Dillon , I’m using a rio floating switch line 8/9 on a 8 weight rod. I’ll have to look those up. I can single hand cast the switch rod and I like it so far, but I wanted some two handed casts in my arsenal when fishing the lakes. And I took your advice and practiced switching my top hands. Thanks.
 

LOC

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here’s a question. Fishing big lakes casting from shore. What casts are out there for this type of fishing? No current to give you a hard right or left. Stripping in line and wanting to recast. Not much behind either.
When you say casting from shore do you mean you are casting from a dry bank or are you wading in the water?

From the dry bank it gets a little more limited on what you can do but I still will do a snap T or a Perry poke but if you have the back cast room just let it rip with a two hand overhead cast.

I fish the bays a lot and you can do pretty much any water born cast you like. Your not swinging the line so in general your just putting the cast back in the direction you stripped it from. A standard switch or a single Spey works great. If I want to make a change in direction lets say I wanted to shift off to my right. I would just place the anchor off to the right a bit and realign my feet and body in the direction of the cast. A Perry Poke works great for this because it's very easy to place the anchor by simply dropping your rod tip in the new direction. You can do the same thing with a snap C.
When you snap the line on the water you just change the angle a bit towards the new cast. Also what your practicing at the park works well too. Just pick up the line roll cast or snake roll it in the new direction and then go into a switch or single Spey cast.
 

Upstate

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When you say casting from shore do you mean you are casting from a dry bank or are you wading in the water?

From the dry bank it gets a little more limited on what you can do but I still will do a snap T or a Perry poke but if you have the back cast room just let it rip with a two hand overhead cast.

I fish the bays a lot and you can do pretty much any water born cast you like. Your not swinging the line so in general your just putting the cast back in the direction you stripped it from. A standard switch or a single Spey works great. If I want to make a change in direction lets say I wanted to shift off to my right. I would just place the anchor off to the right a bit and realign my feet and body in the direction of the cast. A Perry Poke works great for this because it's very easy to place the anchor by simply dropping your rod tip in the new direction. You can do the same thing with a snap C.
When you snap the line on the water you just change the angle a bit towards the new cast. Also what your practicing at the park works well too. Just pick up the line roll cast or snake roll it in the new direction and then go into a switch or single Spey cast.
LOC thanks! Great info. This time of year I’m not wading much, but in the summer I like to get in wade. I saw the Perry poke and that intrigued me.
 

dr d

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You may also fix an appropriate mow - tip with a short tippet
In front to "simulate" water - situation by the resistance.
 
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