Preferred loop

falconer57

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Just wondering what you guys use to tie on smaller saltwater flies #8,6,4. I have used perfection loop mostly and the Duncan loop on larger flies. The Duncan(Uni-knot) will always collapse upon fighting a fish and can be hard to expand into a loop again. Recently saw folks using the no-slip mono loop on a video. That does not have a tag end protruding at right angle to the knot, if tied properly, unlike the perfection loop. The no-slip mono loop supposed to have a 100%plus strength rating.
 

original cormorant

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People I know tend to use loop knots on bonefish flies, to get more free movement of the fly which doesn't seem to be regarded as so important with other fish.

From what I see anglers tend to be split between perfection and leftys/non-slip loops. The perfection seems to be growing in popularity - influenced by guides.

But no knot rates more than 100%, or even close. A bimini is generally supposed to be the strongest.
 

thomasw

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Non-slip mono knot for any fly with which I want a bit more motion; otherwise I use the orvis, nail knot or trilene knot.

I used to use the George Harvey knot for floating flies -- and I still do sometimes -- but I do usually tie a nail knot or orvis because I can tie them quickly and effectively with minimal tippet waste and, most importantly, these two knots are quite strong enough for the trout I target. With large flies for steelhead or salmon, I will sometimes use a trilene or palomar if I want the extra strength of a double pass through the eye of the hook. But honestly I do my orvis or nail knot mostly because they both have never failed for me and I am often too lazy :)
 

trev

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I rarely use terminal loops except when fishing plugs, because unless the hook eye is quite large and the tippet very stiff, the loop will flatten to a pinch point at the eye allowing no more movement than a jam knot.
When a loop is needed my first choice is the Homer Rhode loop, fast easy to tie, and so far has been as reliable as any knot I've used. Second choice would be a double overhand loop for simplicity and adequate strength.

Any knot that requires repetitive twisting of the working end around the standing part is dependant on the number twists be counted correctly and sooner or later I will mess those knots up with too many or too few turns. I've had more failure with the clinch knot than any other that I've ever used because of this.
 

falconer57

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People I know tend to use loop knots on bonefish flies, to get more free movement of the fly which doesn't seem to be regarded as so important with other fish.

From what I see anglers tend to be split between perfection and leftys/non-slip loops. The perfection seems to be growing in popularity - influenced by guides.

But no knot rates more than 100%, or even close. A bimini is generally supposed to be the strongest.
Watch the youtube video. I'm not kidding.
 

trev

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Watch the youtube video. I'm not kidding.
Movies are always make believe, Scotty could never really "beam Kirk up".

Any material is made weaker when bent sharply enough as to make knot, any knot. All knots will always break at less strain than the unknotted material.
 

falconer57

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Movies are always make believe, Scotty could never really "beam Kirk up".

Any material is made weaker when bent sharply enough as to make knot, any knot. All knots will always break at less strain than the unknotted material.
They were using 20# mono and the knot was consistently breaking at about 21# with three turns. Whatever.
 

falconer57

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Non-slip mono knot for any fly with which I want a bit more motion; otherwise I use the orvis, nail knot or trilene knot.

I used to use the George Harvey knot for floating flies -- and I still do sometimes -- but I do usually tie a nail knot or orvis because I can tie them quickly and effectively with minimal tippet waste and, most importantly, these two knots are quite strong enough for the trout I target. With large flies for steelhead or salmon, I will sometimes use a trilene or palomar if I want the extra strength of a double pass through the eye of the hook. But honestly I do my orvis or nail knot mostly because they both have never failed for me and I am often too lazy :)
Really a nail knot for tying on a fly?
 

trev

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consistently breaking at about 21# with three turns.
Did they prove that the "20#" mono would actually break at 20# with no knots? most mono actually breaks considerably higher than the minimum listed on the wrapper, with 20# I would expect the actual break to be near 23# or higher with no knots.
If the 20# advertised rated line actually breaks at 25# 70% of the time and at 23# the rest of the time, then the manufacturer can stress strength and abrasion resistance in advertising.
 

flav

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I use the Lefty/non-slip loop for saltwater, steelhead, and some trout work. I also use it for loop to loop connections in my leaders (tapered section to tippet). I've done a lot of experimenting with loop knots, and it's definitely the strongest loop knot I can tie and tie consistently. In my experiments I found different variations that made different loop shapes and some that were a bit stronger than others, but all were strong. It's the only knot I've experimented with where the line regularly breaks before the knot.
 

LOC

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A non slip mono is what I use for the salt or any fly that benefits from a loop knot. I even use it on a standard bait hook if I am conventional fishing with live bait and the fish are being picky.
 

thomasw

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Really a nail knot for tying on a fly?
No I am lying about a knot preference! :) Seriously, though, it is very quick to tie, strong and it uses minimal tippet. Tying nail knots on flies is easy peasy with one of those Tie Fast tools... But if you don't believe me, perhaps this little video will convince you just how simple it is:>

Fly attached by Nail Knot
 

original cormorant

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karstopo

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Rapala Loop. It’s a myth the tag end must or by definition sticks upwards because the ones I do the tag end doesn’t.

The thing about loop knots is that after so many fish caught, it is a pretty good idea to re-tie as the wear and tear and pressure the fish cause tends to put a weak spot in the loop, not the knot itself. It will weaken enough to break under minimal pressure. I usually push it too far and lose the fish.

Hooks with burrs or rust on the hook eyes are a problem for loop knots. Tie the loop too big and that‘s going to create fouling with the fly.

But, I think loop knots allow for better action with flies or lures, some lures and flies it might not matter as much as others.
 

falconer57

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Which youtube video?

The percent ratings need to be made against the lines actual tested strength not against what the maker puts on the label.

This link https://www.saltstrong.com/articles/best-loop-knot-for-fluorocarbon-leader/ puts the lefty loop ahead of the perfection loop in comparative tests, as well as having the design advantage that the tag end points down line.
The video I'm referring to is on the salt strong channel-"Best way to tie a non-slip loop knot(optimal number of turns for strongest knot experiment)". I was just looking at videos as I was not familiar with this knot, been using perfection loop for years. But for me, the perfection loop sometimes gives me a loop bigger than I want. I'm going to practice this knot. I'm still wondering if this is Lefty's Loop. Of the videos I've watched, there seems to be some small differences in tying it.
 

dillon

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No I am lying about a knot preference! :) Seriously, though, it is very quick to tie, strong and it uses minimal tippet. Tying nail knots on flies is easy peasy with one of those Tie Fast tools... But if you don't believe me, perhaps this little video will convince you just how simple it is:>

Fly attached by Nail Knot
Interesting, who’d a thunk it...
 

original cormorant

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The video I'm referring to is on the salt strong channel-"Best way to tie a non-slip loop knot(optimal number of turns for strongest knot experiment)". I was just looking at videos as I was not familiar with this knot, been using perfection loop for years. But for me, the perfection loop sometimes gives me a loop bigger than I want. I'm going to practice this knot. I'm still wondering if this is Lefty's Loop. Of the videos I've watched, there seems to be some small differences in tying it.
I'm not aware of differences in tyings of lefty/non-slip loop other than varying the number of turns. Net Knots tends to be my point of refeerence.
 

Bambooflyguy

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I swear by the bowline loop. Non slip, fast and easy with minimal waste. Used it for big silvers in Alaska to size 22 with 7x. But as mentioned above, you need to retie after several fish as the loop takes the stress, especially with light tippet. Great for small parachute flies as it won’t trap the hackle fibers.....my .02.....my go to knot! Tag ends in-trimmed in picture.
3C983D24-191D-429D-9109-35C95E1B5A5B.jpeg
 
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