Prolong the life of a floating line?

Classtime

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I'm trying to keep a couple of old floating lines in service. I can apply some fly ointment on stream occasionally for a temporary "fix". I was about to try some homemade flexament -- maybe thinned a bit -- for a more permanent treatment. Thought that I would check with you all first before I totally trashed my old line that is still somewhat serviceable. (I likely used Armor All on it back in the day. Didn't everybody?)
 

planettrout

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I'm trying to keep a couple of old floating lines in service. I can apply some fly ointment on stream occasionally for a temporary "fix". I was about to try some homemade flexament -- maybe thinned a bit -- for a more permanent treatment. Thought that I would check with you all first before I totally trashed my old line that is still somewhat serviceable. (I likely used Armor All on it back in the day. Didn't everybody?)

FYI:


Flexament is for flies, not fly lines...


PT/TB
 

dennyk

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Don't use Armor All! Eventually it will deplete the coating on your fly line. (I got that bit of advice from Sliver Creek as well as other forum members.) Every time out I wipe my lines down with a damp cloth and wipe them dry. Then I apply the fly line conditioner. In cases where the line is exceptionally dirty I'll soak it in warm water with Dawn Ultra dish soap, then rinse, dry and condition.

If your line is cracked or showing signs of dry rot you'll save yourself a lot of trouble by just replacing them. I don't know of any homemade remedy as far as refinishing the line.

Denny
 

Southerncaster

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What others said above, plus when not in use keep/store your lines indoors in a clean, air conditioned environment --not in a hot garage, vehicle, or storage shed. I've still got a couple of my first lines that are in very good condition after decades.
 

silver creek

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I'm trying to keep a couple of old floating lines in service. I can apply some fly ointment on stream occasionally for a temporary "fix". I was about to try some homemade flexament -- maybe thinned a bit -- for a more permanent treatment. Thought that I would check with you all first before I totally trashed my old line that is still somewhat serviceable. (I likely used Armor All on it back in the day. Didn't everybody?)
Armor All eventually dries out fly lines a causes them to crack.

The cheapest line treatment is washing the line with a mild dishwashing detergent like Dawn.


To treat the line on the stream, only use treatments that are made for fly lines and preferably use a treatment from the manufacturer of your fly line. Most treatments are silicone based

For Scientific Anglers it is their dressing pad and line treatment



Rio has a similar cleaning agent and cleaning pad.

 

Ganderzone

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Warm water with a small dash of dish soap, get some 303 protectant spray and a microfiber or soft towel soak line and run through towel, wipe with 303 when done
 

osseous

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I've been doing this simple routine for 10 years- haven't had to retire a single line since....
First- strip off the amount of line you intend to clean. Run a gun cleaning patch thru a little Albolene facial cleanser (Amazon). Pull the line thru the treated patch 2X.
Finally- grab a second patch and apply Loon Payette paste. Pull the line thru that patch twice as well- and return the treated line to your reel. Done. Your line will be clean, slick....and it'll float like a cork.

Sent from my SM-N986U1 using Tapatalk
 

Aluminumchef

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If its trashed near the front end, cut it off, tie on sink tip maybe. We would all like our lines to last forever, but they won't. Use will eventually wear the coating down inevitably. Taking good care of it will certainly prolong its life, but it eventually will die. That to me makes it a wear/consumable item. Trying to bring a dead/failing item back to life is just gonna bring you lots of frustration. Pet Semetary comes to mind.
 

Staflyguy

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I have kept my lines clean and extended their lives but after purchasing some new lines I am sorry I didn’t do it earlier. The new technologies the manufacturers are coming out with certainly outweigh reviving a line that has run its lifespan. With proper care hopefully these new lines will work for many years To come.
 

trev

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You prolong the life of the fly line early on by keeping it clean and out of the sun and heat if not actually fishing, but when (not if) after a few years (or months/decades) the plastic becomes stiff, cracks, or shows memory, it is at that point dying/dead and further treatment just prolongs it's death. Spend $60 and have a new line that you can prolong the life of. Price of a tank of gas or a good diner ain't it? The line will more than pay for itself in pleasure.
 

Hayden Creek

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You prolong the life of the fly line early on by keeping it clean and out of the sun and heat if not actually fishing, but when (not if) after a few years (or months/decades) the plastic becomes stiff, cracks, or shows memory, it is at that point dying/dead and further treatment just prolongs it's death. Spend $60 and have a new line that you can prolong the life of. Price of a tank of gas or a good diner ain't it? The line will more than pay for itself in pleasure.
Great advice. But I wish 60 bucks would fill my tank. Over a hundred right now.
 

trev

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Over a hundred right now
Makes fly gear seem cheap don't it? $100 worth of exhaust fumes.
My tank only holds ~20 gallons and gas is still relatively cheap here, but my point is we tend to cheap out on something like a rod or a line that will last years and don't hesitate to blow dough on what goes up in smoke or gets flushed into the sewer. Priorities etc.
 

Hayden Creek

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Being semi retired at least some of those fumes take me fishing everyday. At least right now. Dry fly season. Priorities indeed.
 

Classtime

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I was just teaching a couple newbies how to catch trout and one of them was using my old dayglo orange SA WF 5 wt --The second line I ever bought. It sinks a little at the front but while he napped after lunch, I cast that rig to catch 3 quick ones from one small pool, releasing each one into the lower pool as I caught the next slightly larger one from a foot upstream. Since I rearranged my priorities and fly fishing has moved up, I have bought a new line for a new rod that is a weight between my others and I do admit that the 60 bucks was well spent. But my old lines aren't worthless. A backpacking buddy suggested as a waterproofing for fabric: silicone caulk thinned with mineral spirits. I think I'll try that before the shoo goo. Stay tuned. :)
 
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