Quick Video of an AK. Assassin Tube

flytie09

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Awesome stuff Ard. You’re a regular Jacque Cousteau. That fly has tons of action. I’m amazed at how off colored the water is and that fly is still popping.
 

Ard

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Hi Mike,

Yeah and that's a small one, the big flies have marabou in then too that adds to the wiggle and swim. If you think about that video I did about how I mend and guide, twitch, then you might imagine there's more movement in the flies materials than in this quick look. In this look it is just hanging off the leader & mini head in a fairly steady current. When you are working them with combinations of up and down mends and an occasional pump twitch sorta move they are raising a scene as they cross the river.

I'll figure out a better way to video different patterns and keep posting them. It takes little by way of time to do and speaks volumes about what's happening in the water. I believe you'll really like what those Wilkinson Sunrays do, they are real movers and proving to be the go to for rainbow & steelhead here. I'll tie one on and do it next time out, probably Monday.

Oh I almost forgot, I kept the streak going today with another trout and one king so I've eliminated the salmon drought.

:)
 

tcorfey

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Ard, that jungle cock eye really does add to the look of the fly in the water. Definitely helps with the visual queue that it is a baitfish and not just a chunk of white stuff. Interesting.
 
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Ard

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Ard, that jungle cock eye really does add to the look of the fly in the water. Definitely helps with the visual queue that it is a baitfish and not just a chunk of white stuff. Interesting.
I've never known if they really inspire confidence from a fish who may see the flies I make Tim but for whatever weird reason they make me feel like the flies are complete. I've always wondered that if the eye, regardless of what type used breeds fish confidence then what do they make of the hooks? It was the same with my dry flies in the past, I tried for good wings and to have them float upright but that little hook sticking down seemed out of place. Given the number of fish that have been caught I have to think that most ignore the hook.........

Ard, are you using tube flies more frequently now?
Pretty much all I use now. Up until 4 or 5 years ago I would still use some shank tied flies but I had issues with the trailing hooks getting wrapped around the hook eye or tippet. Casting exerts many varied torques on whatever we have attached to the very end of our lines, when there is a free swinging hook behind the body of the fly I believe the chance of hook problems increases.

I did find that using the fine wire for attaching the trailing hooks cut down on problems but did not totally eliminate them so the shank patterns are becoming old as they stay in boxes. The tubes with their extensions allow for the eye of a hook to be firmly nested in that extension tube and they become one solid integral unit. You can make an extension any length you wish, longer to accommodate larger longer bodies and wings or very short. For a long extension tube you use what is called a 'jam knot' which is a type of non slip loop knot. With practice you get good at making the loop knot proper length so that the knot will slide far enough into the tube to allow the eye to nest at the very rear and the knot itself to be jammed all the way forward against the smaller diameter tubing where the body is tied.

This may help clear what I just said.


In this image you can see how the tubes I use are formed with a larger diameter rear tube (the extension / hook holder) and small diameter front portion where you tie the body and wing materials. You cut that rear tube to fit the fly and for where you want that hook to be seated. The front tube has such a small diameter that your knot will stop when it slides up to that small tube. Just imaging tying a loop knot that would reach all the way up the long extension tube - hit the small tube but still allow the hook eye and part of the shank to be pulled into the tubing about halfway. That's how a jam knot works.

When you need to unhook a fish and the fly materials are long and in the way you just grab the tube fly by the head and pull. the whole fly will slide away from the fishes jaw and all you have to do is grab the hook which you can now clearly see and remove it.

The last remark I'll make supporting these tube creations is this; everyone who has tied salmon or steelhead flies, even classic trout streamers has had one that flatly refuses to ride or swim in the upright posture you intended when tying it. You know what I mean, the perfect tied fly that when tied on the leader and in the current swims either on the side or upside down in worst cases. The same holds true with tube tied flies. It is a matter of balance I believe, you need some sort of keel action with streamer type flies. Whether that keel action is provided by the wing materials and the attitude with which you tied them in or provided by the hook something must be dominant in the hydrodynamic matter of keeping the fly upright.

I have found that if I miscalculate at the tying bench as I am building a fly intended to be fished subsurface many times I can correct the attitude of the fly in the river by twisting the hook to starboard or port right in that extension tube. The tube holds hooks firmly and you can actually turn it to act as a rudder! Not only can you do this but it works!

There is a slight chance that I am more anal about the way my flies act when I'm bringing them across a river.
 
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