Re-attaching a rod guide

wonkydaze

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I was fishing with a rod I rarely use a few months ago, and one of the rod guides fell off while I was casting. It's a single foot guide. The thread is still intact, and if I shove the rod guide back, it fits snug. Do I need to have the guide redone with new thread and epoxy? Or can I just glue the guide back in? If I can get away with just gluing, should I use epoxy, or is there another type of glue I should use? Please see pics below. I'd appreciate any advice.

Entire rod with missing guide:
1 - Copy.jpg

Close up with the guide that fell out:
3 - Copy.jpg

Close up with the guide shoved back in:
2 - Copy.jpg

Close up of the epoxy and thread (brightened for detail):
4 - Copy.jpg

The rod is a St. Croix Avid 9ft 5wt, and it's no longer under warranty. I don't need it to look pretty, but would like it to be functional. Thoughts?
 

LOC

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Great detailed pics BTW!

In the spirit of TFFF your going to get multiple answers to your issue.

The most cautious of all is the fella who will suggest you need to take it to a rod smith to have it re-wrapped and done properly because you may lose the fish of a lifetime.

The next fella will suggest using a two part epoxy that has some longevity to it. Fix once and only cry once.

A little more fly by the seat of your pants is the dude who is going to just put some UV epoxy on it and hit with a UV light show.
The Granola type will actually walk it out into the sun.

Nearing the bottom of the scale is the crowd who can fix anything with some CA glue.

Last but not least are your Neanderthals who will just shove it back in and hope for the best.

I suggest picking something above Neanderthal and you are good to go.... :)
 
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wonkydaze

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Thanks LOC for the detailed response! And thanks to trev and Bambooflyguy as well. I think I'll go with something a few steps above Neanderthal and use epoxy. Cheap and easy, I love it!!!
 

LOC

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Thanks LOC for the detailed response! And thanks to trev and Bambooflyguy as well. I think I'll go with something a few steps above Neanderthal and use epoxy. Cheap and easy, I love it!!!
Good choice, you’re lucky it’s a single foot and easy to fix. This can happen on double foot guides and it’s a little more pain in the tush to pop the guide back in. But even a double foot can be fixed DIY if you’re careful. Happy to help!
 

silver creek

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I have one other concern about the repair if you just epoxy the guide foot into the old wrap.

On the photo you posted, it looks like the coating on the thread wraps that were over the guide foot could be cracking or worn. If those lines are cracks, the thread wraps need to be recoated to protect them.

Over time, the coating could begin to peel off the wraps and the thread wraps will start to wear and break.


Screen Shot 2021-05-29 at 10.25.04 AM.png
 

el jefe

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To pick up where Silver left off, that guide wrap is also on the ferrule. So that wrap serves simultaneously to hold on the guide, and reinforce the ferrule. If the wraps are cracking and weakening, you are losing some reinforcement on the ferrule, and jeopardizing the integrity of that joint, which may eventually fail and result in a cracked ferrule. Then it's goodbye to a rod that is no longer made. By virtue of the position of that guide, I would follow one of LOC's suggestions, and I would have a rod builder fix that one, if you don't build rods yourself.

And LOC gets my nomination for Post Of The Year.
 

knotjoe

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Do I need to have the guide redone with new thread and epoxy?
Yeah, do that. Also consider moving the position of that guide toward the tip about 1/2" to avoid using it as a "handle" when assembling/disassembling the sections. IOW, leave yourself enough room to grip the ferrule wrap without torquing on the guide itself which is how this damage usually happens. It'll be a larger combo wrap and look a bit odd, yet still functional spacing and avoids the recurrence of the problem.

Manufacturers do this all the time when they combine ferrule + guide wraps, it's too condensed and leads to this problem with guide wrenching. You've another one waiting to happen on the tip section so be careful when ferrules stick a bit and avoid cranking on that guide. If you're gonna keep 'em in those positions for aesthetics, get some grippy rubber pads and tether them to your flywear (vest, pack, etc) so you can grip the skinny parts of the rod without using the guides for torque.

Or train yourself to grip in front of the guides without touching them when assembling/diassembling. To be fair, it may not have been you that did the damage, the guides are in a naturally damageable location for multi-piece rods. Anyone that handles that build style will risk doing what I speak of above, even for aligning sections while fishing. Even flyshop employees inadvertently do it on rods, makes me want to smack 'em.

Excellent pics of the subject matter, BTW.
 

pnc

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Since I build rods and have a rod drying gizmo. I would redo the wrapping. Ten minutes and I'd be in kitchen getting a drink. Rod would already be on dryer.
Couple of thoughts on fixes mentioned. UV cements could work, but never actually tried this. Not sure of drawbacks.
5 minute or most other epoxy will break down in water. Start by clouding, then yellowing, then chipping of just turning to gue. If using epoxy make sure you get one made for water. If not clearly stated on packaging, stay away.
The Ca type stuff or super glues also break down in water.

The finishes made for doing rods claim to stay clear, but all get yellow over time. You might have to peel it to see the yellowing. Depends on colors underneath, the thread & rod. But what they do well is flex. Part of their durability. The thing that needs addressing is the cure time. Many of these finishes take 4 hrs to "set-up". The rod will need to be rotated. Not constantly, but every few minutes at least.
Saw mentioned ferrule. I would keep the guide where it was. Some rods are very sensitive to guide placement. Just don't grab the guides for separating rod sections.
 
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