Reason to fly fish stillwater :-)

Joey Bagels

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I’m gearing up for a Stillwater trip this weekend as it happens. Part of a work-related trip to the Rockies. Tied some new flies, oiled and cleaned the reels, mended the wading boots. The water I have in mind never sees much pressure since it’s pretty far away from any major towns or cities. The waters are rich and the trout grow big and fast. Great, stark scenery, big trout, quiet, and clean, high plains air. What’s not to love about that?!


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Rip Tide

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A few years back, we joined up with a little community of fly fishers who only fish the ponds
That's actually pretty common in their neck of the woods where the brookies and salmon all migrate from the rivers into the lakes once the water temp hits the mid 60s
One day when we told them we were going off to fish a river, two people separately told me;
"We don't do that, we don't have the suits" (waders)
 

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clsmith131

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When you see gulls diving on a massive school of threadfin pushed to the surface by hundreds of ravenous exploding, swirling, tail slapping, shad smashing striper, the adrenaline triggers that predatory response that makes you sling a fly at them. You have to battle the bass boats on the lakes near me, and most of them throw their big clunky wake baits and two ounce bucktails at them or even drive right over them. But it's worth it when your fighting a 12 pounder off the stern and your buddy's got one off the bow that he swears will have yours beat. Not the serenity of drifting dries down a babbling brook to sipping sophisticates, this is a different fishing experience altogether. While I understand some people prefer the solace of a remote river, I don't know anyone that wouldn't want to feel their backing knot clicking through the tip of a doubled-over 8wt after they watch fish compete for their fly.Screenshot_20171023-150352.jpg
 

AzTrouter

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I fish about 40% still water since we established a southwestern command homestead :- ) The mountain lakes here are a lot fun and a different sandbox to play in. I particularly like them when they get a little froggy along the banks and during the damsel hatches.

Like every place we’ve ever lived you get the same, 75% of the people crowding into 25% of the resource. I have locals telling me how bad AZ fly fishing sucks and the day before I had a 20 plus fish day on plump and spunky stream born Browns sucking hoppers on a creek without boot prints on the bank.
 

bigspencer

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Ditto on the diversity of water wherever it can be found. I mostly enjoy the brooks/streams/rivers along with the bogs but always enjoy fishing the inlet brooks, streams and rivers as they empty out into the lakes, particularly Moosehead and above, both during the days of ice-out through June and July early mornings and evenings. Love the browns and rainbows the most wherever they can be found here in the NE(Larry, Rip Tide and Joey Bagles...You guys are KILLING me!;) ) but finding brooktrout in those waters where they aren't expected is a thrill each spring when the hatches begin to pop...not to mention the giant Hexagenias and Brown Drakes.
 
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I mainly fish streams, but during the spring when the rivers are running over the banks, I will switch to stillwater fishing, mainly because I just like to fly fish. Here are a few reasons I like stillwater fishing:








Nice underwater photos. Mind sharing what camera you are using? Thanks
 

Acheron

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I mainly fish streams, but during the spring when the rivers are running over the banks, I will switch to stillwater fishing, mainly because I just like to fly fish.
This ----^

By far my favorite is moving water but sometimes it's just not safe or fitting my style so...when I need that big fish feeling, springtime in the lake is where it's at!!
 

WWKimba

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I love to fish still water because that's what I cut my teeth on over 55 years ago! Here in central NY I am literally surrounded by flat water - large and small. I can go in ANY direction and be less than a 2 hour drive (most within an hour!) of some fine fishing lakes - Ontario to the north, the Finger Lakes to the west (with some very fine wine trails!), Oneida Lake and Green Lake to the East and Onondaga Lake (one of the BEST catch and release smallmouth lakes!) a mere 10 minutes away. Add that to the various ponds and minor lakes (did I mention Little York Lakes and its surrounding glacier formed minor lakes to the south). Also, there are quite a few "box-of-chocolates" flat water areas around me. These are stream/river fed and drained ponds/lakes or gravel pits that you never know what will hit your fly because of it's biodiversity - that's MANY species of fish for those who are science challenged - in what usually is a smaller body of water! The transition areas (especially the inlet) can be real hot zones!

Kim
 

thomasw

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Fly fishing on lakes is very much a fantastic problem solving challenge. I enjoy it immensely, although I do have a bit of preference for fishing medium to small rivers: those that I can wade. In either case, still or moving waters, I love the challenge of problem solving. Both can be restful, beautiful and very peaceful; the surroundings can be just stunning ... that might be one of the best reasons to go fly fishing anywhere!
 

guido

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I haven't fished for trout in a stream for over 40 years. Lake fishing is infinitely more interesting. Plus you have to be really creative to hang a fly in a tree when fishing from a float tube. Stream fishing, it was unusual for me not to end up spending most of my time getting unstuck and untangled...
 
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joe_strummer

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Odd zombie discussion. I've never heard any 'purists' suggest fly fishing should be practiced on moving water only. I wonder if we haven't amalgamated some perceptions with the voices in our head to make up a strawman.

Now, i know a lot of people think fly fishing is something for trout, on streams, and that's it, and some of these people fish, including fly fish, and some of them don't. Who is surprised by someone who doesn't really know too much about what they are up to?

otoh, I have heard those possessed of the zeal and purity of the convert making some crazy assertions, and used to have clients that never ever fished anything but trout streams when they came to Colorado.
 

FlyFlinger2421

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Since I began fishing stillwaters for trout a couple of years ago, I have become obsessed with figuring out how to fish them! It is completely different than streams and as I am discovering, takes much more patience. The other evening I fished 3 hours and caught 6 rainbows. Then the sun went down and everyone else had left. A hatch started, the fish turned on and in 20 minutes I added 8 more rainbows before it ended! This happens a lot I have discovered. People just leave too early.
 

bigspencer

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Gave a long answer on this earlier. Nolw the short one ----

BECAUSE THAT'S WHERE THE FISH ARE!

Kim
Ditto,
I grew up fishing not only streams and brooks but the shoreline of big lakes and nearby ponds via canoe from back in the 60s when I learned the enjoyment of flyfishing. The populations of mayflies, caddis, terrestrials, stoneflies, midges and other minutae were so thick that the trout feeding activity was dependable when the weather cooperated.... Combine that with wildlife who come to feed, drink and swim around, especially during the heat of summer.
 

flyinflight

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The really neat thing about fishing reservoirs and lakes is they're stocked with trout on a scheduled basis. The other news is they're usually between 7'' to 9''. Not a bad thing, but after a while, this can turn into a yawner. Solution? Fish another lake that has feeder streams so the trout can spawn and grow big (if regulated), or, and one of my personal favorites, fish pay-to-play lakes. I tube the lakes of Mt. Hood and I see this 7'' to 9'' type thing all the time. If they're 12" to 13" they're a holdover and the lake needs to be at least 25' deep or they'll die from winter kill. I'm geared up and on the water, during weekdays, by 7:30 am ( that's the intent anyway). I never fish public lakes on a Saturday, but private pay-to-play lakes work out fine.

I've used this mindset for years and it's worked out great. Stillwater is fun and engaging if you know the ecosystem and have an expectation of why you're there. It's all part of a master plan. By the way, I do fish on Sunday publicly (early), and of course privately.
 
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