Recommendations on a small travel camera?

quattro

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Lumix ZS200
I like that D850! I've pondered going full frame for a long time. The D7500 is what got in the way of that. It's not your camera. The output is pretty good though. The fact that I own multiple DX series lenses ranging from 10mm to didn't help either.

I am familiar with the RX100 series (and BHPhoto) and owned one at some point. It somehow managed to disappear. I'm not sure what to say beyond that - except that I hope it turns up again at some point. It was a great little camera! That 200mm zoom on the newer version looks more interesting and more versatile for my purposes.

Do you have any experience with the Lumix ZS200? It has a Leica lens that goes from 24mm-360mm. Reviews on this camera seem good as well.
No experience with the Lumix. The Olympus TGs are great cameras - I've owed 2 over the years. They are great for on the water shots and even underwater shots! Really apples to oranges to compare the Sony and Olympus - different tools.
 

Acheron

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Not sure if it makes a difference and not sure if they have al ense to fit your needs but I did like the TG-5 has interchangable lenses and filters. Looks like TG-6 does as well. I always wanted to play with this stuff and get better at photoging, but I have too many hobbies and not enough time. :D
 

ts47

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No experience with the Lumix. The Olympus TGs are great cameras - I've owed 2 over the years. They are great for on the water shots and even underwater shots! Really apples to oranges to compare the Sony and Olympus - different tools.
Agreed, and a valid point. It's a question of what's the best tool for the job. Unfortunately, it feels like I need to add some more definition to what the job is.
 

ts47

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If you like the quality of your cell phone images, save some money and get a water proof case for it with a lanyard attached to your vest.
This is an interesting suggestion. In my case, I live on my cell phone for work. I'm not sure there is a scenario, short of buying a second cell phone where I would feel comfortable using it as an underwater camera. If something happened to it, it would cause a lot of problems.
 

dillon

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This is an interesting suggestion. In my case, I live on my cell phone for work. I'm not sure there is a scenario, short of buying a second cell phone where I would feel comfortable using it as an underwater camera. If something happened to it, it would cause a lot of problems.
Oh I get it. I missed the part about underwater shots. I wouldn’t do that either. The waterproof case is for insurance against the accidental dump in the drink.
 

ts47

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I'd suggest a camera that has a lens that is equivalent to at least as wide as 24mm on the wide end. And, don't ignore the interface, some are intuitive, some are not.

For my purposes, camera selection boils down to two separate "wishes" -

A) I either wish I wasn't lugging around a pack stuffed with 30 pounds of photo gear on a remote trail.
-or-
B) I can be back home after a trip looking at the images on screen at 100% and sure wish I'd carried that pack stuffed with 30 pounds of photo gear.

TINSTAAFL (there is no such thing as a free lunch)
That 30lbs is a good argument for a mirrorless DSLR. With the number of lenses I already own, the Z50 has been tempting, but feels too comparable to my D7500. Nikon is short on DX-Z lenses as well. Switching systems to something that has more of a selection is a conversation that I'm not ready to have right now.
 

MCHammer

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The problem I had when looking at waterproof cameras is the TG single-digit series doesn't have a viewfinder or a tilting display. I got a TG 850 which does have a tilting display. Picture quality isn't top of the line, though. Unless you want a waterproof camera, I would be leaning toward the Sony RX 100. I don't have one--I have a Sony A6000 with the 18-135 lens. But I saw a slide show by a woman who hiked the Himalaya Trail with one and the photos were outstanding.
 

ts47

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Not sure if it makes a difference and not sure if they have al ense to fit your needs but I did like the TG-5 has interchangable lenses and filters. Looks like TG-6 does as well. I always wanted to play with this stuff and get better at photoging, but I have too many hobbies and not enough time. :D
Thanks for the offer to try a macro shot. I did find some online that makes me think the camera would work for that. I noticed the accessories too, but haven't looked at them yet. I'll check it out.
 

ts47

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The problem I had when looking at waterproof cameras is the TG single-digit series doesn't have a viewfinder or a tilting display. I got a TG 850 which does have a tilting display. Picture quality isn't top of the line, though. Unless you want a waterproof camera, I would be leaning toward the Sony RX 100. I don't have one--I have a Sony A6000 with the 18-135 lens. But I saw a slide show by a woman who hiked the Himalaya Trail with one and the photos were outstanding.
Yeah, that RX100 is an exceptional camera. The Lumix is mostly comparable. The trade off with the Sony is a longer zoom and less light. Your A6000 is pretty nice too!

I went looking for the TG850 you mentioned. It appears it's been discontinued. I also learned that Olympus has sold off it's camera division. I'm not sure what this will do to their new cameras moving forward. I don't think it would stop me from considering the TG6 though.
 
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ts47

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No experience with the Lumix. The Olympus TGs are great cameras - I've owed 2 over the years. They are great for on the water shots and even underwater shots! Really apples to oranges to compare the Sony and Olympus - different tools.
Quattro,

I'll direct this at you only because I assume based on your D850 comment you know what you are doing, and perhaps more so than I. Anyone is welcome to respond though.

I've said this earlier in this thread and will mention it again in more detail. The new mirrorless cameras are much lighter and in many cases have smaller and lighter lenses. They also take photos that are fully comparable to (regular) DSLRs like my D7500. In many cases, they are actually upgrades. If I was full mirrorless, I wouldn't need this thread. I would just bring that camera along and hike it in to wherever I was going.

...which brings up an interesting thought. Choosing a camera (for me) is like choosing that one fly rod to fill the hole in your quiver. I fully intend to go mirrorless in the DX size over the next year or so. Most of my photography is architectural. There's all the chasing (soon to be adult) kids, preserving vacation photos, and more. DX in the higher end models will handle all of this. I am still hoping that Nikon will come out with a Z70 and some more DX-Z lenses so I don't need to scrap everything I already own and switch brands - which would be a very expensive proposition. The point being - If I were fully mirrorless, there wouldn't be a need for this thread as sizes and weights would be somewhat less. A DX mirrorless camera and travel zoom might make a camera like the RX100 feel redundant. Note: I'm too old to go THAT far off the beaten path.

If the above was true, the hole that needed to be filled would be the waterproof camera.

How is my logic? Am I missing anything?

EDIT: If I were to go full frame like you, the RX100 or similar could easily still fit a hole.
 
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hatidua

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One constant variable in these camera threads is the definition of good image quality. 'Good', is a moving target and not one we all see the same way. I'd consider taking your own memory card to the best camera vendor in your area. Swap your own memory card between every camera you are considering, aim each camera at the same exact scene in the camera store either zoomed in on penny on the countertop or of the whole store to evaluate different focal lengths. I would be very surprised if the tool that is best for you isn't readily apparent when the unprocessed RAW images are brought up for review at actual-pixel size on a 4K screen.
 

quattro

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Quattro,

I'll direct this at you only because I assume based on your D850 comment you know what you are doing, and perhaps more so than I. Anyone is welcome to respond though.

I've said this earlier in this thread and will mention it again in more detail. The new mirrorless cameras are much lighter and in many cases have smaller and lighter lenses. They also take photos that are fully comparable to (regular) DSLRs like my D7500. In many cases, they are actually upgrades. If I was full mirrorless, I wouldn't need this thread. I would just bring that camera along and hike it in to wherever I was going.

...which brings up an interesting thought. Choosing a camera (for me) is like choosing that one fly rod to fill the hole in your quiver. I fully intend to go mirrorless in the DX size over the next year or so. Most of my photography is architectural. There's all the chasing (soon to be adult) kids, preserving vacation photos, and more. DX in the higher end models will handle all of this. I am still hoping that Nikon will come out with a Z70 and some more DX-Z lenses so I don't need to scrap everything I already own and switch brands - which would be a very expensive proposition. The point being - If I were fully mirrorless, there wouldn't be a need for this thread as sizes and weights would be somewhat less. A DX mirrorless camera and travel zoom might make a camera like the RX100 feel redundant. Note: I'm too old to go THAT far off the beaten path.

If the above was true, the hole that needed to be filled would be the waterproof camera.

How is my logic? Am I missing anything?

EDIT: If I were to go full frame like you, the RX100 or similar could easily still fit a hole.
So the mirrorless set ups are great! I haven't moved to one yet really for batter life as much as anything. I still manage to make trips (pre-covid) where I'm off the grid occasionally for days and the DLSRs had longer battery life. As long as your not trying to manage multiple days without power - the mirrorless are a great way to go. I really like the Nikon Z6, Z6 II and Z7 - the z6 is a far better deal and I'd probably go with it over the d6 II ord7. With the FTZ lens adapter you'll be able to use your Nikon lenses (check the version as some of the older autofocus aren't compatible - but most current ones are. Only other issue to be aware of - your shooting a D7500 with a DX sensor - so if you are using DX lenses the Z6/7 will crop the sensor to DX size - effectively eliminating half your sensor. FX lenses give you access to the entire sensor.
I'm constantly tempted to pick one up.
Good Luck - lots of great choices.

Namibia, Skeleton coast.
View attachment dsc_3152.jpg
 

LePetomane

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I would recommend that whatever camera you get, learn how to use it in advance. You're taking a trip of a lifetime, being on the trip is no time to learn your camera. There are plenty of good cameras out there. I use an old Lumix DMC-ZS40. I know it and its limitations well so I can work around them to get decent photos.
 

ts47

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So the mirrorless set ups are great! I haven't moved to one yet really for batter life as much as anything. I still manage to make trips (pre-covid) where I'm off the grid occasionally for days and the DLSRs had longer battery life. As long as your not trying to manage multiple days without power - the mirrorless are a great way to go. I really like the Nikon Z6, Z6 II and Z7 - the z6 is a far better deal and I'd probably go with it over the d6 II ord7. With the FTZ lens adapter you'll be able to use your Nikon lenses (check the version as some of the older autofocus aren't compatible - but most current ones are. Only other issue to be aware of - your shooting a D7500 with a DX sensor - so if you are using DX lenses the Z6/7 will crop the sensor to DX size - effectively eliminating half your sensor. FX lenses give you access to the entire sensor.
I'm constantly tempted to pick one up.
Good Luck - lots of great choices.

Namibia, Skeleton coast.
View attachment 33471
Thanks for the reply and confirming my thoughts. Talking through this with everyone that responded in this thread has been helpful. And may I say... Wow! That's an awesome photo you posted!! I'm guessing you took that while on travel.

The full frame Z cameras have been tempting ever since they came out. Whether I can afford to go full frame or not, I just can't justify for my picture taking spending the extra money and dealing with the extra size and weight. My plan is to stick with the DX size and upgrade my camera and lenses as worthwhile options come available. The FTZ adapter will work with all of my DX lenses. So no problems there. It's just a matter of Nikon catching up with their offerings so I can move forward.
 

ts47

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I would recommend that whatever camera you get, learn how to use it in advance. You're taking a trip of a lifetime, being on the trip is no time to learn your camera. There are plenty of good cameras out there. I use an old Lumix DMC-ZS40. I know it and its limitations well so I can work around them to get decent photos.
This is very good advice!
 

ts47

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One constant variable in these camera threads is the definition of good image quality. 'Good', is a moving target and not one we all see the same way. I'd consider taking your own memory card to the best camera vendor in your area. Swap your own memory card between every camera you are considering, aim each camera at the same exact scene in the camera store either zoomed in on penny on the countertop or of the whole store to evaluate different focal lengths. I would be very surprised if the tool that is best for you isn't readily apparent when the unprocessed RAW images are brought up for review at actual-pixel size on a 4K screen.
Hmm... I hadn't considered this before. I could have used this advice in the past and will use it with my next real camera purchase. (y)
 

iv_wjb

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I like my Nikons but think I would prefer the Tough series in this one case. Can you tell me more about that connection device? Is it really secure? And how exactly to you get the camera lens facing forward rather than pointing down on those float trips?
There is a plate that screws into the tripod mount on the base of the camera and the connection “rotates” in a similar manner to the mount for a GoPro, and locks into place securely with a screw connection. Not sure if you can see the mount in this photo but, this is how it sits on my vest. I’ll see if I can find a better photo, if you need it. I hope that helps!

C2E48700-F1E1-4322-95F8-02523C631750.jpeg
 

ts47

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I don't want to derail this thread but that topic is a thorn in the side of many pro's who eventually jumped off the Nippon Kogaku horse.
I get what you are saying. They have been behind the game in some ways for a while now. My paltry investment in DX equipment is nothing when compared to what many pros spend. I'll stop here as this is not the topic this thread is meant to address.
 
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